Imperfect sporting moments

Indianapolis 2005 pitlaneHaving picked up on The Daily Telegraph’s 50 Perfect Sporting Moments last week, and suggested a few F1 inclusions, I could hardly ignore today’s 50 Imperfect Sporting Moments.

This time just one F1 moment made the list. Any guesses?

It was Michael Schumacher taking out Damon Hill in in 1994 championship decide at Adelaide. Once again, I can conjure up a few memories that definitely belong on this list.

Schumacher alone has given us the 2006 Monaco qualifying scandal by parking it at Rascasse and that crazy finish to the British Grand Prix in 1998, where he won in the pits.

In 2002 the finishes at the A1-Ring and Indianapolis were rigged and ruined by Schumacher and team mate Rubens Barrichello.

There was Jerez 1997 when he hit Jacques Villeneuve – a double bill of infamy as Villeneuve was later involved in a horrible stage-managed finishi involving the two McLaren drivers.

There was another unedifying position-swap between the McLaren at the very next race, at Melbourne in 1998.

The two Alain Prost & Ayrton Senna crashes at Suzuka in 1989 and 1990 definitely rate.

In 1982 half the teams boycotted the San Marino Grand Prix at Imola.

And last, but certainly not least, the six-car ‘race’ at Indianapolis in 2005. Two farces in four years at that track. And they wonder why F1’s not catching on in the States?

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4 comments on Imperfect sporting moments

  1. Carldec said on 5th July 2007, 7:07

    I think they are 100% right to focus on Michael Schumacher taking out Damon Hill in in 1994. It was worse than any of the other things you mentioned because it effected the entire championship.

  2. Robert McKay said on 5th July 2007, 12:06

    I think the Indy 6-car race should have been on the list. What a screw up that was. Imperfect is an insufficient descriptor.

  3. They probably didn’t think Indy 2005 qualified as a sporting event…

  4. bernie's nemesis said on 6th July 2007, 12:46

    I must agree. Schumachers desire to win at all costs is a prime example of sport gone bad. The most talented driver in the world, he proclaimed himself. Why not call him for what he is. A cheat. Twice proven.

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