2009 Formula 1 testing pictures part 2

Pedro de la Rosa drove a Force India and Honda tested a 2009 front wing

Pedro de la Rosa drove a Force India and Honda tested a 2009 front wing


More pictures from 2009 F1 testing at the Circuit de Cataluna below.

Today Pedro de la Rosa sampled a Force India, with rumours suggesting he might join the team next year. Interestingly, the car was still equipped with a Ferrari engine, potentially giving McLaren a chance to gain useful information on their rival’s engines.

Also Honda ran a 2009-style front wing (above) and Nick Heidfeld tried BMW’s 2009 aerodynamics kit.

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20 comments on 2009 Formula 1 testing pictures part 2

  1. I dont know about the rest of you but I like the new car’s look. We will see if it makes the racing better.

  2. Smitty said on 18th November 2008, 20:37

    I’ve already gotten used to the 2009 aero. So much that I find the 2008 style wings unnatural now! Especially the rear wing, it looks so low to me now.

    Curvy, yet slightly disproportionate at first 2009 car = beautful

  3. Striay said on 18th November 2008, 20:44

    to me awful but i will get used to it looks like a fĂłrmula audi palmer car.

    Anyone know where hoy can watch the testing ???

  4. Good in 2009: Smoother lines to the cars’ appearance.

    Bad in 2009: That shrunken rear wing looks terrible. There needs to be more symmetry between front and rear, and I have a distinct feeling that we’re going to see a lot of spinners in the first race.

  5. So, is that the same track configuration where 1:20.584 was the fastest Q2 lap this year? and Vettel just did 1:19.751 on it, so, I imagine maybe he was running more aero than the rules will allow on 09, but nevertheless it seems to speak really good about the shift from aero to mechanical grip.

  6. Muckymuck said on 18th November 2008, 23:36

    It’s not so bad with either just the new rear wing or just the new front wing, but when there’s both it looks really unbalanced to me.

    I wonder how much aesthetics would affect sponsorships in the long run. With the car being less appealing (to some), it takes away the sexiness of the sport which is what brings in the advertising $$. In terms of viewership, it might not affect long time F1 fans, but it may put off new fans.

  7. Keith Collantine (@keithcollantine) said on 18th November 2008, 23:44

    The Honda front wing doesn’t seen as bad as the BMW one, but the difference in proportion between it and the rear wing still seems strange. The smooth-sided BMW profile is nice though.

  8. Too Good said on 19th November 2008, 0:42

    News is ForceF1 car that PDLR tested today is still Powered by Ferrari. perhaps now he can validate some information received from Stephney. Alas too late to get any benefit from it though.

    Likes of PDLR/Wurz should get a Technical roles in Paddock rather than preventing a genuine upcoming talent a race seat though.

  9. Terry Fabulous said on 19th November 2008, 1:30

    How brisk are the Red Bulls and Torro Rossos!
    1st through 4th on a full day of testing!

    Love the cars new looks

    130 days

  10. Mr Soap said on 19th November 2008, 1:56

    “Likes of PDLR/Wurz should get a Technical roles in Paddock rather than preventing a genuine upcoming talent a race seat though.”

    But you need an experienced driver as a test driver in order for them to be really useful.

    Besides, I’d argue against long term testing being a particulary good step towards F1.

  11. Too Good said on 19th November 2008, 4:15

    Mr Soap – Cost cutting 101 in F1 : Testing has significantly reduced since 2007. 2006 was the last year when teams tested as much as they wanted that too mainly because of Ferrari not agreeing to test mile limits claiming that its the only “Front runners” on Bridgestones and hence has less data.

    Coming back to my point – given that as it is Testing times are restricted and “race drivers” prefer to spend as much time possible on track in test and on Fridays, this anyways has taken opportunity of Young drivers to become good testing experience and then promote to race seat.

    With PDLR/ALEX WURZ the case is different these two guys are really sought after on the grid for their Technical feedback and as such I said now the time has come for them to move the next step in career Technical Roles within the team.

    And at least whatever opportunity can be provided to the younger lot to get the “actual track time” should be given.
    Once the 2009 specs are finalized that’s in Jan 2009 Race drivers will be back in the saddle to give their final feedbacks and the young pilots will be cooling their heels anyways.

  12. Mr Soap said on 19th November 2008, 7:00

    Look at recent new F1 drivers. It’d be very hard to argue that either Piquet or Kovalainen particulary benefitted from testing for a year. Nakajima doesn’t really seem to have profited from his chunk of testing. Vettel also took a fair bit of the season until his form became obvious – although how much this was due to him is certainly debatable. Whatever, you can’t really say they enjoyed much of an advantage over those who didn’t come in from a years worth of testing.

    I remember ages ago, Jackie Stewart doing a series where he drove different F1 cars, and his usual complaint with the bad cars was lack of comfort, caused by not having an experienced driver point out the flaws – obvious or not, but rather newer drivers who’d be accepting of them. And given that’s the kind of grunt work test drivers are meant to do, it’s not hard to see why you’d want people with years of experience as your development drivers.

    I’d argue it’s a better use of time to get racing experience in other categories than to test extensively in F1. Racing talent is obvious enough, whether they’re in a lower formula car or an F1 car, and F1 test experience hasn’t really been a requirement. Senna didn’t have much to speak of prior to signing to Toleman, Hamilton certainly didn’t, Raikkonen only had three tests.

  13. Apart from the high rear wing , I prefer the 2009 looks (at least from what we see so far) , I think it’s ’cause I never liked TOO many aero bits on an F1 car , now they are mostly gone. Much “cleaner”. Usually happens to me around end Jan. but I’m already filled with great excitement for the new season – maybe a long 4 months ahead.

  14. Sven Weichbrodt said on 19th November 2008, 7:37

    I am happy that the F1 Overtaking Group has finally recognised that in order to guarantee overtaking the cars need to be less reliant on aerodynamically derived downforce and more reliant on mechanic downforce, ie grip provided by the tyres (thank God the grooved tyres are gone).

    However, I think somewhere deep down in their charter there is a clause which also states that the new cars must be as ugly as possible.

    If this is the new 2009 look then I will listen to the GP’s on the wireless rather than on the TV as I doubt I can stomach it. The entire aesthetic of the car is wrong, with that tall, narrow rear wing combined with that ironing board on steroids at the front.

    Could they have looked at visual balance, ie make the rear wing wider but limit its interaction with air off the rear tyres and limit the number and chord of the elements?

    God help us, can they get anything right?

  15. the new rear wings are shocking and the front wings are going to be smashed off easier but if theres more overtaking then im all for it……

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