2010 F1 teams list to be announced (Update: FIA has revealed list)

How many teams will be on the FIA's entry list for 2010?

How many teams will be on the FIA's entry list for 2010?

Today the FIA is due to finally announce its F1 teams entry list for 2010 – the consequences of which could be far-reaching for Formula 1.

There have been signs in recent days that Max Mosley and the eight remaining teams represented by FOTA might be close to a compromise solution.

The list published by the FIA today will tell us whether it believes a compromise is workable or if it’s resigned to driving many of the existing teams out of the sport.

Update: The FIA’s list has been published – see the comments for details.

The row has dragged on for so long that, amid all the talk of a breakaway championships and changes in the technical regulations, it’s easy to lose sight of what’s important.

What began as a discussion on how to guarantee the long-term future at the sport has turned into a conflict that arguably places it in even greater jeopardy than the recession does.

Max Mosley insisted that, as none of the manufacturer teams had agreed to commit to Formula 1 for the future, it is essential that F1 run to a budget cap.

Although he has still not conceded that fundamental point, yesterday it emerged that he had suddenly yielded on several key areas – for example, potentially allowing a cap of ??100m which is more than the ??47m originally proposed.

Mosley remains fixed on the idea of a budget cap despite the FOTA teams having offered him the commitment he demanded until at least 2012. One therefore has to ask whether what he really wanted all along was not a commitment from the teams to stay in F1, but something else.

Among the points conceded by Mosley yesterday were:

  • Potential increase of the cap to ??100m followed by a ‘glide’ towards a lower limit
  • Exemptions from the budget cap for highly-paid staff other than drivers
  • Not giving performance advantages to budget-capped teams
  • Signing of a new Concorde Agreement (to define the future governance of the sport and distribution of income)

Aside from sticking to his plan for some form of a cap, this amounts to a U-turn on almost every one of Mosley’s positions. But one thing is conspicuously missing from Mosley’s offer – any mention of reform to the governance of F1.

This has become a significant issue for the teams, tired of the endless political bickering that goes on in Formula 1, and seeing Mosley as the one responsible for it.

Mosley had previously indicated he will make a decision this month on whether he will stand for another term as president of the FIA. Are the teams holding out for an assurance that he will not run again come October?

The point at which reconciliation was the smart thing to do passed a long time ago. Now it is the only thing to do.

As I wrote last week, I firmly believe the FIA should have taken up the teams’ offer of a deal for the next three years. I hope later today we will not be ruing their failure to seize that opportunity.

Read more

Advert | Go Ad-free

174 comments on 2010 F1 teams list to be announced (Update: FIA has revealed list)

1 2 3 5
  1. Prisoner Monkeys said on 12th June 2009, 0:30

    Assuming that all ten current teams are included, I’m banking on the new places to go to Campos, Team US-F1 and Prodrive. Lola might buy Toro Rosso or Renault if they leave.

  2. Adam D said on 12th June 2009, 0:42

    Alike Prisoner, i’ll predict the 3 new teams that’ll come into the sport providing the current 10 (which Williams and FIndia we know for a fact) so technically the ‘FOTA 8′ stay in the sport. USGPE will defiently get one of the spots. Prodrive with Richards backing would be good as would Campos. So it’ll be those 3.

    Although the Litespeed entry rumoured to be the new ‘Lotus’ with Herbert and Gasgoyne on board would be gr8, i cant see them getting a spot.

    Prisoner raises a gr8 point in saying about STR, as i believe at the end of this year they will be sold, so should Lola/Prodrive not get a spot automatically they could just buy STR quietly after the season and come in straight in the new year as a repackaged team.

  3. F1Yankee said on 12th June 2009, 0:42

    “he had suddenly yielded on several key areas”

    this seems to be a link to nowhere. entirely appropriate, i think :)

  4. sean said on 12th June 2009, 0:52

    If this is true Keith the icing on the cake would be Mosley announcing he is stepping down in october.

  5. m0tion said on 12th June 2009, 1:05

    I have trouble believing that this report is accurate. The new teams would all fail and probably not even make the grid even if paired with existing teams. The money just isn’t out there for no hopers. Even Brawn will struggle.

  6. marc said on 12th June 2009, 1:15

    I suspect that Mosley will only resign when he can do so without looking like he was forced into it. I can’t imagine how he would couch his resignation in triumph.

    But FOTA, the FIA, and Mosley in particular have impressed me with their ability to make defeat look like victory.

    So I wish Max a graceful exit, and I look forward to his replacement.

  7. scunnyman said on 12th June 2009, 1:18

    I had read that Mosley was going to agree to 100m euros for 2010 and then 45m euros the following year.
    That does not seem much of a glide.

    As for the teams line up i hope all the current teams are there, or maybe the loss of toro roso to one of the new teams. I don’t like the idea of new fake teams so i don’t mind Lola, Prodrive and UsGp.

    Once everything is sorted i hope that formula one can stabilise and have the same regulations that work for several season with being messed about with.

    • Prisoner Monkeys said on 12th June 2009, 1:57

      I had read that Mosley was going to agree to 100m euros for 2010 and then 45m euros the following year.
      That does not seem much of a glide.

      Everything’s negotiable. Mosley might want to halve the budget cap for 2011, but that’s still eighteen months away. A lot can happen between now and then.

  8. Leaf said on 12th June 2009, 1:33

    I will be very disappointed if the entry list comes out without the manufacturers. I want to see USF1 in the mix but not at the expense of Ferrari, Mclaren and the rest. However, after reading about the dramatic last moment pole position of Peugeut and the epic battle that looms with Peugeut and Audi this weekend it would be unbelievable to see Ferrari, Renault, Toyota et al in the mix next year!

  9. Prisoner Monkeys said on 12th June 2009, 1:50

    Either way, we’ll know in a few hours. Someone on another forum allegedly knows people in Lola and claims they’ve already been told they’re in, but the person who posted it has admitted they find the claim iffy at best.

    I’ve long believed that neither FOTA or the FIA want the manufacturers to leave and that they simply cannot see eye-to-eye on the matter. It wouldn’t surprise me if the eight remaining FOTA teams were included on the entry list regardless with the FIA telling them they can back out if they wish without incurring the usual penalties.

  10. Rabi said on 12th June 2009, 1:52

    Let’s face facts here, Bernie can’t sue Renault/Ferrari/Toyota if they are excluded from the championship. If however they are part of the championship, refuse to race and form a rival series then he can sue them.

    All what Max has done is given his left arm (Bernie) some leverage to use on the teams. What they will be hoping is that FOTA don’t create a rival series and deliberately field poor teams in the F1 championship thereby corrupting the on-track product in F1 and making the FOTA championship look better.

    Then if a FOTA Championship can nail the following five elements then F1 will be doomed:
    1) Track Selection
    2) V10 Engines
    3) Stability of Regulations
    4) Customer Cars/Components, and
    5) HD-TV Broadcasting

    That is why we’ve had all the smoke screens coming from both FIA and FOM to put enough doubt in FOTA’s mind to abandon any thought of a rival series and get them to tow their line.

    Like I said earlier expect FOTA to be named tommorow, I would be extremely suprised if they aren’t.

    • Kovy said on 12th June 2009, 1:56

      Add to that free broadcasts on the internet, and allowing footage on Youtube. Not doing that at the moment is only going to hurt F1′s popularity with casual fans, and annoy dedicated fans.

    • Prisoner Monkeys said on 12th June 2009, 2:19

      Then if a FOTA Championship can nail the following five elements then F1 will be doomed:
      1) Track Selection
      2) V10 Engines
      3) Stability of Regulations
      4) Customer Cars/Components, and
      5) HD-TV Broadcasting

      They can’t. Not in six months. A year, maybe, but there’s no way they can have it by the start of 2010.

      • Rabi said on 12th June 2009, 3:42

        Why can’t they?

        I have seen plenty of arguments of why they can’t but how do we know if FOTA hasn’t been in private negotiations with track owners? Surely they would jump on the chance to have a more profitable grand prix.

        And don’t forget who is the backbone of FOTA – Ferrari, Toyota, Renault, BMW and Mercedes. I am sure they have enough of a marketing arm collectively to push a new racing series within 6 months.

        I wouldn’t be suprised if they do have a 6 month roadmap, similarly I wouldn’t be suprised if they don’t bother with a rival series and just go to LeMans (or other).

      • phil c said on 12th June 2009, 3:46

        they could easily have this an more. All they need to do is call motogp founder and it will be organised in a matter of weeks. Teams are not stupid. Bernie makes things sound difficult but in actual fact they are not. Racing on road courses will be hard however existing race tracks will have no problem.

        Mugello
        Silverstone
        San Marino
        Laguna Seca
        Indy
        Phillip Island
        Barcelona
        hockienhiem
        Suzuka
        Barhrain

        None of these tracks are owned by bernie and they have every right to host what ever gp they like.

        Moto gp race at 18 tracks prime for f1. track fees will be a 3rd of what bernie charges,(tracks will make money not lose money) and Tv companies will flock to the new series. ITV, RAI, EUROSPORT, Every current opposition sports network in each country will apply. This is not taking into account how many existing tv contract would fall over, of which would be several… Rules can be simply identical to this year. No difference. existing cars can remain the same. The teams own the cars not the FIA or Bernie.

        Personally i hope a rival championship starts. And f1 collapses so bernie and the FIA disappear. they will cry for the manufactures to come back. If this does not happen now we will have the same issue in 3 years. F1 problem is how the money is distributed, Teams are getting screwed.

        • Antifia said on 12th June 2009, 12:27

          We could add a few more tracks to your list:
          Brands Hatch
          Sebring
          Watkins Glen
          Jacarepagua (Rio)
          Zandvoord
          Montreal
          Magni Cours

          • Diacho said on 12th June 2009, 13:48

            Sorry, Antifia
            Jacarepagua is gone, because of work done for the PanAmerican games…

          • GooddayBruce said on 12th June 2009, 15:04

            I think that a breakaway series would be totally possible at short notice if they raced with this years cars. I think it will run at a loss and the minute it is underway FOTA will fall out over the rules.

            The only way that a breakaway will work is as a threat and to put pressure on Max to resign. Then it can be scrapped. I reckon the shelf-life will be about 1 year

            As for the circuits?

            Mugello – bike track – no
            Silverstone – yes
            San Marino – yes
            Laguna Seca – too short
            Indy – yes
            Phillip Island – too small
            Barcelona – too rubbish
            hockienhiem – yes
            Suzuka – yes
            Barhrain – yes
            Brands Hatch – yes but questionable facilities
            Sebring – no!
            Watkins Glen – too old
            Jacarepagua (Rio) – gone
            Zandvoord – too small and too short
            Montreal – yes!
            Magni Cours – too rubbish but acceptable

            How good does this sound?
            Portero los funes
            Melbourne
            Long Beach
            Bahrain
            Imola
            Jerez
            Monaco
            Montreal
            Indy
            magny cours
            Silverstone
            Nurburgring
            Portimao
            Spa
            Monza
            Suzuka
            Laguna Seca
            Interlagos

          • Damon said on 12th June 2009, 16:33

            @ GooddayBruce
            Laguna Seca too short??
            Come on – the IndyCars have always been racing there and it’s a fantastic venue!
            The corkscrew = win!
            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LB_k_wlr5Bc

  11. scunnyman said on 12th June 2009, 3:27

    Why do they have to have a rival series up and running by next march?
    Can’t we dedicated fans put up with a wait until 2011 for an alternative to F1 if the FOTA teams are not included.
    Maybe by the end of 2010 with a diluted series we will be begging to wath the new series.

  12. GB2009 said on 12th June 2009, 3:58

    One option I saw a while ago, and which makes sense, is for FOTA to buy out A1GP, which has been losing money so fast it makes a tea strainer look ineffective!

    If they did that, what they would have ‘bought’ would be (aside from the debt of the series!) an already FIA approved series, an exisitng set of deals with circuits and promoters, and the rights to several TV deals around the world.

    If they took it over, they could then change the rules as they saw fit, making the teams 2-cars instead of 1 (or even 3), put in place the same tech regs as currently exist, and then just get on with it.

    the other nice point here would be that the A1GP season starts in the later part of one year, and carries over into the next, so if they all see out 2009, then buy A1GP, let the existing A1 season finish in early-mid 2010, make the changes and then kick of in Sep/Oct 2010, they don’t have to make it work in 6 months, but will have more than a year to get it right.

    Sounds like an easier way of getting their own championship than starting from scratch, yes?

    Having said all of that, I hope it does not come to this…

    • phil c said on 12th June 2009, 4:12

      Problem is A1 has the FIA involved and the A1 Tv deals are worthless, no money in it. Furthermore half of the the tracks they use are not up to scratch in terms of f1 standard.

      They would have no issues starting a new series. There is no tv or tracks in the world that would turn down the opportunity to host a series or race with Ferrari, merc, Renault, Toyota, Redbull etc etc not only that subject to rules, i have no doubt other teams would follow. Sponsorship dollars is what counts not a name.

      • persempre said on 12th June 2009, 17:06

        A1 is not an FIA Championship, though. They make their own rules, phil. The FIA has only a policing role.

        Yes, the TV deals are poor. Most of the problem being that the races tend not to be shown on free to view. However, TV follows where they think the interest & money is.
        Unless there has already been an enormous amount of planning going on behind the scenes (always possible but not highly likely as the teams first choice would be a sensible F1) then 2010 would be pushing it, I think.

  13. Prisoner Monkeys said on 12th June 2009, 4:06

    I have seen plenty of arguments of why they can’t but how do we know if FOTA hasn’t been in private negotiations with track owners? Surely they would jump on the chance to have a more profitable grand prix.

    Because circuit owners won’t want to **** the FIA and FOM off too much. The threat of a breakaway series is only a last-minute resort, and it’s one that’s been thrown around quite often in the past but has never come to fruition. FOTA might say they’re serious now, but they’ve said that before, too, and look what came of it: nothing. And considering that the latest threat of a rival series has only come about since around Monaco, there hasn’t been much time for negotiations, espeially since FOTA are busy negotiating with the FIA.

    None of these tracks are owned by bernie and they have every right to host what ever gp they like.

    Those that are currently with the FIA signed a contract with FOM, and you can bet that Bernie Ecclestone has a clause in each and every one of those contracts that says the FIA has exclusive rights to hosting the world’s premier open-wheel racing formula. As for the likes of Mugello, Phillips Island and Laguna Seca, they are either under-funded, lacking the facilities needed to host a race of this magnitude, or unsafe for Formula One.

    Personally i hope a rival championship starts. And f1 collapses so bernie and the FIA disappear.

    Don’t hold your breath. It’s better that one man owns the rights to Formula One than to have a dozen men squabbling over who controls what. As for the FIA, Formula One isn’t the only thing they control. Both GP2 series, the World Rally Championship, World Touring Cars, GT3 and every single national sports car organisation and series answers to rules dictated by the FIA. If you get rid of Formula One, they don’t just disappear.

    Why do they have to have a rival series up and running by next march?

    Because if they delay, they risk never starting at all. If there’s a breakaway series, the FIA World Championship will still be going ahead. If FOTA don’t do anything, it would be even harder for them to create a serious rivalry because the FIA will have not only drawn the audiences, they’ll also point to the lack of a FOTA series as proof that FOTA cannot run one on their own.

  14. Prisoner Monkeys said on 12th June 2009, 4:07

    I have seen plenty of arguments of why they can’t but how do we know if FOTA hasn’t been in private negotiations with track owners? Surely they would jump on the chance to have a more profitable grand prix.

    Because circuit owners won’t want to annoy the FIA and FOM too much. The threat of a breakaway series is only a last-minute resort, and it’s one that’s been thrown around quite often in the past but has never come to fruition. FOTA might say they’re serious now, but they’ve said that before, too, and look what came of it: nothing. And considering that the latest threat of a rival series has only come about since around Monaco, there hasn’t been much time for negotiations, espeially since FOTA are busy negotiating with the FIA.

    None of these tracks are owned by bernie and they have every right to host what ever gp they like.

    Those that are currently with the FIA signed a contract with FOM, and you can bet that Bernie Ecclestone has a clause in each and every one of those contracts that says the FIA has exclusive rights to hosting the world’s premier open-wheel racing formula. As for the likes of Mugello, Phillips Island and Laguna Seca, they are either under-funded, lacking the facilities needed to host a race of this magnitude, or unsafe for Formula One.

    Personally i hope a rival championship starts. And f1 collapses so bernie and the FIA disappear.

    Don’t hold your breath. It’s better that one man owns the rights to Formula One than to have a dozen men squabbling over who controls what. As for the FIA, Formula One isn’t the only thing they control. Both GP2 series, the World Rally Championship, World Touring Cars, GT3 and every single national sports car organisation and series answers to rules dictated by the FIA. If you get rid of Formula One, they don’t just disappear.

    Why do they have to have a rival series up and running by next march?

    Because if they delay, they risk never starting at all. If there’s a breakaway series, the FIA World Championship will still be going ahead. If FOTA don’t do anything, it would be even harder for them to create a serious rivalry because the FIA will have not only drawn the audiences, they’ll also point to the lack of a FOTA series as proof that FOTA cannot run one on their own.

    • phil c said on 12th June 2009, 5:35

      The circuits are not controlled by the FIA or FOM. Silverstone can host any event is likes, it does not need permission from bernie.

      Bernie contracts will be all relating to f1, his contract cannot prevent these tracks hosting another open wheel series. This is restricting competition in the first instances and against the law. This is commercial suicide for all these tracks, purpose built tracks are there to host racing regardless of class. His contracts would be in relation to facility standards revenue etc etc and Formula One World Championship.

      Track standard whilst some tracks may be poor, for the terms of racing they are still perfectly fine. Starting from an average fan, you would rather pay 100 pounds to go to Silverstone for 4 days to see the FOTA teams then pay 400pounds for 4 days to see a bunch of nobodies at Donigton.

      The FIA controls a lot of series i agree, but popularity wise, and fines wise it is f1 that keeps it alive and in the spotlight. Im not sure but is there a need to have the FIA involved.

      As for the rights, i agree one man is better then 10 teams but at the end of the day I have said several times, the issue with f1 is the funding of it, fix the funding of it and there is no issue with money. F1 is the only sport in the world were the promotor and a bunch of suits make more money then the people promoting it. The teams should be getting a min of 85% of the total revenue. They promote the sport with racing not bernie, not max and not CVC. The fans get screwed and the teams get screwed. Bernie Should have sold the rights to the teams and only the teams.

    • persempre said on 12th June 2009, 17:25

      I agree with a lot of what you say, Prisoner, but some isn’t correct.
      First, the teams have never actually said they are thinking of an alternate F1 series. They`ve recently started to hint that it may be a possibility but their preference has always been to remain in F1 as long as F1 remains a sensible pinnacle of sport type series.

      Mugello could cope happily with F1 type events. Since Ferrari got involved with it, it has been used for testing & also for races/events which include the Ferrari F1 cars past & present.

      There are 27 FIA Championships for which the FIA makes regulations.These do not include GP2, A1 & many more (including many of the support races seen at F1 GP weekends).
      The series that are not “FIA Championships” make their own regulations which the FIA police. Hence why there`s no reason to necessarily expect that the same Stewards should act the same for, say, GP2, as for F1. GP2 has its` own rules which the Stewards have to follow.

      I personally don`t think that it would be necessary to rush into a new series (if one is even intended). From FOTA`s point of view it would be better to get it right & to see just how the FIA series fares as far as racing, fan numbers, circuits & TV broadcasters etc. go.
      They may just be able to sit back & wait for contracts to end & others disenchanted with FOM & FIA to come to them.

  15. Steve K said on 12th June 2009, 4:10

    History Lesson to be learned from IRL V CART. . .The only reason the IRL won was they had control of the Indy 500. No such thing exists in F1 and there are many many tracks to hold Grand Prix at throughout the world. This could be a long eternal split if that is indeed what happens.

    • Patrickl said on 12th June 2009, 12:26

      A comparable event in F1 would be Monaco. Their contract will come up for renewal and then they would move to where Ferrari is.

      Furthermore the CVC will collapse if the big teams go away, viewers are lost and contracts get renegotiated or go belly up.

      If the CVC collapses FOM is gone and then all bets are off.

      There is no way that a couple of GP2/F3 startups are going to outshine the manufacturers league.

      Look at F1 today. People are even bored of BrawnGP and Red Bull winning mainly because they are Ferrari, McLaren or Renault fans themselves. They don’t like watching unknown people race for the win.

      • As was mentioned on the BBC coverage the other week, Monaco is the only circuit on the calendar that DOESN’T have a contract with Bernie…

        • phil c said on 13th June 2009, 1:25

          Not only that the prince of monoco said it wont host a race without ferrari and the big teams. It will be hard for monoco to host a gp for all the rich and famous without the brands the rich and famous use. (Ferrari) The glitz and glamour of famous names,the teams and money is what makes f1 work and the particular attraction to monoco, get rid of that and monoco disappears. That alone is worth several 100 million dollars to bernie. Monoco is the jewel in the crown when it comes to sponsors and tv. More poeple watch the monoco gp then any other race on the f1 calendar.

    • TommyB said on 12th June 2009, 16:59

      History Lesson to be learned from IRL V CART. . .The only reason the IRL won was they had control of the Indy 500. No such thing exists in F1 and there are many many tracks to hold Grand Prix at throughout the world. This could be a long eternal split if that is indeed what happens.

      If it doesn’t it won’t be as big. There is nothing like NASCAR to come and make it bigger.

      I’m sure FOTA would be bigger than F1 with lots of good teams like Ferrari in it rather then useless teams with Cosworth engines.

1 2 3 5

Add your comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

All comments must abide by the comment policy. Comments may be moderated.
Want to post off-topic? Head to the forum.
See the FAQ for more information.