Fernando Alonso should renounce his Singapore Grand Prix ‘win’

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Nelson Piquet Jnr, Renault, Singapore, 2008F1 has been dogged by scandal after scandal in recent years.

In 2005 we had the Indianapolis farce, two years later brought the ‘spygate’ row, last year was dominated by Mosley’s sadomasochism scandal, and the first half of this year was taken up with the budget cap crisis.

But F1’s latest row, over Renault ordering Nelson Piquet Jnr to crash during the Singapore Grand Prix, is surely the worst yet. Indeed one writer has already called it the worst act of cheating in any sport.

I won’t claim a sufficiently encyclopaedic knowledge of sport to make that claim, although it’s gained some favourable responses on Twitter. But it’s hard to think of a worse example from F1’s history.

There have, of course, been other occasions where drivers have crashed or spun on purpose. Alain Prost hit Ayrton Senna in 1989, and Senna hit Prost back in 1990. Michael Schumacher hit Damon Hill in 1994 and Jacques Villeneuve in 1997.

Like Piquet’s crash, these all involved drivers risking the lives of themselves and others, though admittedly to varying degrees – Senna piled into Prost at around 150mph, Schumacher was doing rather less when he took out Hill.

But what sets the Renault case apart is the offensive cynicism of a team ordering one driver to risk injury or worse in a crash to benefit his team mate.

It was not just Piquet at risk – but spectators, marshals and other drivers. The impact showered debris across the track – and recent accidents have left us in no doubt of the terrible risks that presents.

It’s one thing to have a team like McLaren being caught using a rival team’s confidential information. That’s obviously wrong and must be punished – but it doesn’t put anyone’s life at risk.

The FIA may have offered Piquet immunity from punishment but he should not be immune from criticism. Renault’s plan was disgusting but his willingness to go along with it in the hope of promoting his career was cowardly.

It raises all sorts of questions. Was anyone besides Briatore, Symonds and Piquet involved? Had Renault, or any other team, tried this sort of thing before? Have they done since?

And given the manner in which he scored this ‘victory’, should Fernando Alonso now publicly deny the credit for it? I think he should – regardless of whether he knew about it or not (and so far there is no evidence that indicates he was aware of it).

A two-times world champion has no need of tainted triumphs handed to him in a corrupt fashion. He proved that well enough with his victory at Fuji in the very next race.

In 2006 he told the world he no longer considered F1 a sport after being handed a joke of a penalty by the Monza stewards. Now it’s time for Alonso to tell us his no longer considers Singapore 2008 one of his Grand Prix wins.

Renault Singapore crash controversy

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286 comments on Fernando Alonso should renounce his Singapore Grand Prix ‘win’

  1. should rename this place Planet F1…

    Some of the comments and stories are complete juvenile illiterate rubbish.

    Waiting for the next LH is the great driver ever born thread / comment…..

    • I was thinking exactly the same thing. After LH was champion, this place got filled with ignorant babbling.

      • bad_whippet said on 17th September 2009, 11:17

        FLIG and AP…

        I’m not sure the problem is with Lewis Hamilton or his supporters, but people like you who are intent on starting a war of words between fans.

        Your comments do nothing to raise the standard of debate (as Keith rightly posted), but insense LH fans to bite.

        F1Fanatic remains the best F1 blog/site on the internet and it’s majority of fans/subscribers offer nothing but informed and educated discussion.

        I put it to you that it’s comments like “juvenile illiterate rubbish” and “ignorant babbling” that clog this blog up with irrelevant posts.

        Go back to PlanetF1 please.

    • Keith Collantine (@keithcollantine) said on 17th September 2009, 8:54

      And you thought that by posting a comment labelling people ‘juvenile’ you might raise the standard of debate?

      This article isn’t even relevant to Lewis Hamilton so why are you dragging him into this?

      Why don’t you say why you don’t agree with me and then we can have a proper discussion.

      • I’m sorry Keith, my apologies, your right in pointing out my stupid heat of the moment post.

        Mostly becoming really frustrated with F1 more so than anything…!!!
        That is from a long time fan.

    • Williams4ever said on 17th September 2009, 12:38

      You are so right…. Alonso Should Renounce Singapore GP “win”, Couldn’t there be a ridiculous suggestion than this. I wonder if the author would have applied the same rationale if British(read Hamilton) was in this situation. At one end everyone agrees based on the evidences produced that Alonso is as innocent party in this situation as rest of the 19 drivers on the grid, so why he should be renouncing the result of the race, the result is what it is. If the entire Singapore incidence is so shameful for the sport, by the same rationale the author should request all the drivers, teams, sponsors, fans to RENOUNCE from the event.
      Similar Article written by Author last week about Karun Chandok makes me feel that more than healthy discussion on F1, intention of author is to stir the pot, just like what PlanetF1 and crash doh net do elsewhere.

      • Keith Collantine (@keithcollantine) said on 17th September 2009, 15:10

        I wonder if the author would have applied the same rationale if British(read Hamilton) was in this situation.

        Yes I would.

        Similar Article written by Author last week about Karun Chandok makes me feel that more than healthy discussion on F1, intention of author is to stir the pot, just like what PlanetF1 and crash doh net do elsewhere.

        And yet you never bothered to mention it at the time. Why not post a comment on there explain why you don’t like it and I’ll get back to you?

        • Williams4ever said on 17th September 2009, 15:29

          And yet you never bothered to mention it at the time. Why not post a comment on there explain why you don’t like it and I’ll get back to you?

          If you revisit the post there were posters, who had pointed that out, that the post was Non-Subject just like this one, this article is exactly having same effect, there it was ethnic slander here its Alonso-Vs-Non Alonso Fans.

          What Alonso should do is his business and not ours to tell him. If you agree that he is innocent in this incident “based on the evidences” he has every right to accept FIA decision of not altering the race results (If FIA does so decide).

          Your expectation from Alonso is like asking Kim Clisters to renounce her recent win in US Open because Other Participant (Serena Williams) defaulted the Semi-final match. Because now the Win has become tainted because of someone else’s wrong doing

          • sato113 said on 17th September 2009, 17:55

            i get what you’re saying Williams4ever- that if Alonso never knew about the race fix, then he should deserve that win. But as it stands, his team cheated (behind his back?) to make him win. and as a double world champion he should have the courage to say ‘I won’t accept this win’ now.

            I think it is Renault (more specifically Flavio) who should renounce this win.

            but of course if Alonso knew, then shame on him.

          • James G said on 17th September 2009, 19:26

            Williams4ever, you wrote:

            “Your expectation from Alonso is like asking Kim Clisters to renounce her recent win in US Open because Other Participant (Serena Williams) defaulted the Semi-final match”.

            No, Williams4ever, it’s not like that at all, because Serena Williams and Kim Clisters are not part of a team. It’s more like asking Kim Clisters to renounce her recent win in the US Open because her trainer sneaked into Serena William’s changing room and drugged her water bottle.

          • Williams4ever said on 17th September 2009, 21:02

            @JamesG – Its subjective interpretation on Track “All Drivers” are Competitors from that perspective if other participants stupid action is “Tarnishing” who incidentally is in his team as well.. why should a innocent victim give his hard earned (assuming he didn’t slack as he wasn’t aware of this sub-plot)victory.

            His situation is tricky if he takes that higher ground extends a olive branch, his detractors would rile him on that as well.

            E.G – Remember how the detractors responded to Hamilton’s Special Conference in Sepang.
            Remember how people responded to embarassed Shumacher’s attempt to push the trophy in Barichello’s hands in Austria. I am personally biggest detractor on Schumi but now Schumi can claim the same thing, Team conspired the “Switch” he was unaware of it. So Does Ross Brawn put on Chopping block for the Austria’02 in-discretion which was again case of manipulating outcome of race???

      • David BR said on 17th September 2009, 22:40

        This isn’t a question of indirectly accusing Alonso of being involved in the crash plot; it’s a question of him acknowledging that he gained a race win because other people in his team (or any other people: it wouldn’t matter) cheated (and risked lives) to help him achieve this win.

        The only thing I’d say is that altering the result now isn’t justified or sensible (and has been ruled out by MM). So Alonso renouncing the Singapore 2008 win would or should be symbolic. But it would go some way to making sure his own name isn’t sullied by this story and showing his support for the integrity of F1. Maybe he will make a statement after a decision is reached by FIA. To be honest, if he’s indeed innocent and had no idea of the crash plot, then it would be the correct thing to do, since he – theoretically – knows as little of any of the rest of us concerning what happened until FIA’s investigation is concluded and the verdict reached.

  2. Bartholomew said on 17th September 2009, 4:27

    Alonso should keep the win. Alonso still had to drive the car really fast to win.
    I´m tired of all this finger – pointing. Worse things are done and said behind closed doors between Bernie, Todt Newman and others

  3. Steve K said on 17th September 2009, 4:28

    Id be shocked if this is the first nor the last time something like this happens. The teams are too close. The fact that they share just about everything right down to team orders is just a bit much. If they did a better job of separating the two cars into two distinct teams with nothing but shared information and ownership this is less likely to happen. Id love to see Dale Jr crash intentionally to give Jimmie Johnson a win. The dynamic of the teams in NASCAR or Indycar would never allow that to happen. The bottom line is Barry Bonds still hit all of those HGH aided Homeruns and Fernando Alonso crossed the finish line first in Singapore. Fine the hell out of Renault and move on.

  4. Prisoner Monkeys said on 17th September 2009, 4:55

    Alonso should only renounce his win if he were in on it. If the plot was limited only to Piquet, Briatore and Symonds, it wouldn’t have been too difficult to keep Alonso in the dark.

  5. Harv's said on 17th September 2009, 4:57

    if alonso was disqualified, then why would there be no winner? you can have a race with no winner.

    some people have been comenting that if alonso was disqualified rosberg would stay 2nd and singapore would say “no winner”, that would be obsurd! who has ever herd of a race where no one wins but someone comes second?

    if alonso does get disqualified then rosberg should inherit the win but not gain anymore points (8 points), same with hamilton, move him up 1 place but he keeps 6 point and so on and so on…

    if alonso had finished 2nd then he would have been stripped of his possition by now, because of his position (1st) that he finished it will be harder (politically) to strip it from him.

  6. Rob R. said on 17th September 2009, 5:03

    “It is the worst single piece of cheating in the history of sport.”

    I guess the guy who wrote this article, has never heard of Mara-bleeding-dona at the World Cup 1986? Wait, what am I to expect from Simon Barnes, this is the kind of pompous rubbish he puts out regularly……

    I don’t really care that Renault stole this race. If it was me, I would just let it slide. But then, “if it was me”, I would never have come up with such a ridiculous safety car rule that we had last year! It’s the FIA’s fault that this ridiculous scandal happened. It’s the FIA’s fault that F1 a laughing stock yet again. Careless, poorly thought out rulemaking is what leads to rubbish like this!

  7. But F1’s latest row, over Renault ordering Nelson Piquet Jnr to crash during the Singapore Grand Prix, is surely the worst yet. Indeed one writer has already called it the worst act of cheating in any sport.

    I agree this is the worst because is the first time we have been able to see the evidence of 2 Top Managers planning, in cold blood, to put one driver life at risk just for a bunch of points, not even a win not to say a Championship.

    Prost, Senna, Schumacher incidents, despite are very much regrettable, were made by drivers fighting for a championship in the heat of the moment.

    It’s the first time we have seen most of the evidence of one affair, so at the end, it’s quite similar to the effect of those photos that make history transmitting a crude reality that everybody “knew” but nobody had seen (or felt).

  8. Richard said on 17th September 2009, 6:23

    Frankly im surprised Keith is just going to assume quilt before the hearing. Im sure Flav and Pat were forced to resign by Renault for getting into this public relations nightmare and the handling of piquet jnr. They made him extremly bitter.
    I still dont see the motive in all this. The season was long lost. They made the car competative ok but knowing how radicaly different the cars would be in 2009 it was no indicator of future success. Also they had no way to know Alonso would get into 1st position. Your not going to cheat just to gain a few positions or get a point or two.
    Piquet jnr is so bitter as is his father, it just looks like emotional lashing out. Remember Max was very angry after Flav’s comments about him. Mosley could be looking for pay back. The telemetry is circumstanial evidence, its Piquets word against Flav no way to prove for sure.
    As for Alonso, would he chance his two titles and his whole career and legacy for one possible win? Why wait till last races of the season? Unless the FIA has some yet to be revealed hard evidence i just cant how it all fits together.

    • Keith assumed nothing, Renault admitted. And there is motivation – keeping Alonso, convincing management to continue with f1 program and the publicity from winning 1st night race in F1.

      Telemetry is hard physical evidence and we got admission of guilt from Renault. Safety car gave Alonso chance to get on top of order, he wouldn’t be there on merit if not for safety car period at exact time it happend.

    • Keith Collantine (@keithcollantine) said on 17th September 2009, 8:55

      Frankly im surprised Keith is just going to assume quilt before the hearing.

      I’m not assuming any guilt on Alonso’s part.

      • Bigbadderboom said on 17th September 2009, 9:42

        It’s not even about guilt on Alonsos part, it’s simply about doing the right thing and retaining some credability for himself from this mess. I personally don’t believe that Alonso was aware of a “Crash Plan” but he made had his own suspicions, but why raise them? Why would he discuss them? He had won the race, and what need would there be for Flav and Pat to discuss it with Alonso, they needed the win for the team and themselves, and in a way Alonso may have been a pawn in their game. But even though he may be unaware, it would still be right to make a public statement and renounce the victory IMHO. For Sure

      • sato113 said on 17th September 2009, 17:57

        Keith, just to calm people down i think you should change the title of this article to a question rather than a statement.

        • Keith Collantine (@keithcollantine) said on 17th September 2009, 21:36

          No, because I stand by my opinion. I have not said that Alonso is responsible for what happened or that he knew about it. But I do feel it’s in his best interests to publicly distance himself from what happened.

          Besides, do you really think it would change people’s opinions if I changed the title to a question? I don’t see how.

          • sato113 said on 18th September 2009, 14:43

            i agree that he should renounce his win, but i can see alot of people are getting angry at you for stating your opinion, (which is great i think!). just a suggestion, keep up the good work. B)

          • sato113 said on 18th September 2009, 14:43

            i agree that he should renounce his win, but i can see alot of people are getting angry at you for stating your opinion, (which is great i think!). just a suggestion. neway keep up the good work. B)

          • sato113 said on 18th September 2009, 14:48

            sorry for the double post! p.s i obviously mean i think its great to see ur opinion. I don’t mean to say i think it’s great people are getting angry. lol

  9. invisiblekid said on 17th September 2009, 6:44

    At the people saying how can there be no winner if alonso gets DQ’d etc.

    Someone in another post linked to a rule whereby ( and something along the lines of

    ” the results from a previous race or season cannot be altered after that season is finished ”

    So I don’t think Alonso’s win will be stripped and no-one get moved up. If they could do that, then it could mean a team would have more points at the end of it, but no get any extra money etc.

    Oh to all those over the numerous news articles bleating on about how if there was no crash, then Lewis would not be champion, the entire would would have been different and would by now have life on Mars……give it rest will ya?

    • Ronman said on 17th September 2009, 7:02

      That would be a start, but renouncing that win means selling out his team.

      Fernando might be stuck in a tight place. selling out the team that gave him a chance and 2 titles because of two sleazy cheats?

      as much as i hate what is happening, my feelings about Fernando’s involvement are mixed, if he is involved he has to be kicked out, if not, he should be banned with the team for the rest of this season, and then let on his own device for next season….

  10. Fast Lada said on 17th September 2009, 7:20

    What a way to win your first GP, have a trophy handed over to you. (For Nico). Alosno should keep it or give it in to the FIA or whoever…Out of interest how did you work that one out Jorge?

  11. Trying to establish a baseline for how sensational this event is is a interesting question.

    While risking ones life and the lives of others is clearly bad there is some amount of difficulty with this in the context of F1. Should the racing stop because there is a risk of injuring somebody? No. So the drivers know that, for example, overtaking has a risk of injury to themselves and the other drivers and yet we want to encourage that. However deliberately crashing does contain intent in it.

    On the other hand we have a wide collection of examples in F1 where one team mate who is clearly about to win the race has handed over the win to another driver. Why didn’t the FIA defend gamblers in those cases? Why only now. In some ways (ignoring the danger to peoples lives temporarily) I find the blatant team play of a driver being forced to sacrifice their win for a team mate sticks in the craw more than what amounts (ignoring the danger to peoples lives temporarily) to quite a clever strategy of vastly improving one of your driver’s positions.

    I’ll say this baldly so as to not be confusing. Both of these things are wrong, both of them are cheating, but both of them are similar. One is more dangerous than the other, but pulling over before the line has always highlighted that to some the team is more important than their win.

    In other sports we have seen doping which has often been very dangerous for Athlete’s.

    And we have seen in many sports for the sake of betting that people such as boxers have deliberately lost so that somebody can make money on them. Surely from a sporting perspective that is worse?

    Finally of course we have the tragic example of Tonya Harding http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tonya_Harding#The_Kerrigan_attack and many others. Even the milder form in F1 of deliberately downing a competitor by crashing into them seems to me worse. You have more danger, all the cheating and yes in some cases (not F1) you have injuries to competitors.

    I would say that there have been worse cases of cheating in other sports for sure, and in the case of F1 this is certainly up there, but may not even be the worst.

    • Keith Collantine (@keithcollantine) said on 17th September 2009, 8:58

      The Tonya Harding one is an interesting example (although it means classifying figure skating as a sport, not sure about that one…).

      In other sports we have seen doping which has often been very dangerous for Athlete’s.

      Yes but only for the athletes – Piquet;s crash put marshals, spectators and other competitors at risk.

      • Well yes… I can see the argument… I guess the Olympics committee say it is. But seriously these things happen more often than we’d like.

        Yes but only for the athletes – Piquet;s crash put marshals, spectators and other competitors at risk.

        And a driver crashing into another one?

      • If I remember well, we were able to definilety classify F1 as a sport because it is “an activity, pastime, competition, etc that usually involves a degree of physical exertion”. Not that I am really wanting to defend figure skating but we can’t deny that the argument we often use to justify F1 is a sport, can apply there.

        http://www.f1fanatic.co.uk/2009/08/27/f1-not-just-a-sport/

  12. Kayser Soze said on 17th September 2009, 7:35

    This is like the Hamilton case – “I was told to do so, so I did it.” Then the bosses got sacked.

  13. Mutton said on 17th September 2009, 7:58

    This by no means is the worst act of cheating. It’s certainly unsportsmanlike, but you could even say it has been tactics similar to the good-old Schumi days.

    Sold matches are much worse. The Harlequins-gate in rugby is much worse. Intentionally hurting an opponent is much worse.

    That said, the involved parties still need to be heavily fined and stripped of the win. The Alonso bashing is only valid if he is indeed involved, so far that has not been proven.

    • Unless you’re referring to another incident, how is the Harlequins-gate scandal much worst? Asking a player to fake a blood injury is hardly dangerous as opposed to asking a driver to crash a car into a brick wall at high speed.

      But cheating is cheating, whether it’s faking a blood injury, deliberately crashing a car, diving in the penalty area or taking performance enhancing drugs. It is a sad reflection of the current state of sport with huge amounts of money at stake and pressures place on sports people to perform; resulting in unsportsmanlike risks being taken. At the end of the day there are very few winners and many losers. The biggest loser being the fan as the sport stops being a sport.

  14. I agree that Alonso should renounce his win only if he was involved in the planning of the whole thing.

    Even if he suspected something afterwards and even if he might have found out the truth about it, I don’t think it’s easy to come out and say “Look people, MY TEAMMATE followed the orders of MY MANAGER so MY TEAM could get a victory for ME. It was all fixed, so, now you can start to BAN MY TEAM from the sport and leave ME jobless for the rest of the year, ok?”

    If he was not involved in the planning, he shouldn’t be stripped of his win and trophy. I’ll use a “what if” to make my point, even though “if’s” are something I usually hate. Let’s say Alonso was fighting for the title against Hamilton and Massa. Let’s say Alonso had a gearbox problem and abandoned the race in the early stages. Then, Briatore, knowing the pit-stop strategies of the adversaries tells Piquet to crash, in order to bring the safety car in and ruin Hamilton’s and Massa’s race, and handing a maiden win to an innocent Rosberg. Would you say Rosberg should renounce his win because Flavio Briatore is retarded?

    • Keith Collantine (@keithcollantine) said on 17th September 2009, 9:16

      Regarding your hypothetical situation, I would say no, because Renault’s plan was not designed to help Rosberg win.

      I think the smart thing for Alonso to do right now, assuming he is innocent, is to come forward and say “I knew nothing about what was going on, I am appalled that the team behaved in this way, I don’t need to cheat to win races and so I no longer consider this a race I won.”

      It would be a show of integrity and sportsmanship, two things F1 badly needs to rediscover after this latest incident.

      • I think the smart thing for Alonso to do right now, assuming he is innocent, is to come forward and say “I knew nothing about what was going on, I am appalled that the team behaved in this way, I don’t need to cheat to win races and so I no longer consider this a race I won.”

        Totally agree.

      • Mutton said on 17th September 2009, 9:56

        agreed

      • Spaniard said on 17th September 2009, 10:02

        Lets not fool ourselves, F1 fans secretly (or openly in some cases) love the controversy and conspiracies that now form an integral part of the “sport”.

        If F1 was 100% integrity and sportsmanship and lacked the scandals, cheating, arrogance, foul-play, and all the front-page headlines, gossip and rumours these bring, then I suspect your viewership would decrease substantially.

      • Ok, you make perfect sense here. That’s exactly the what I want to hear him say, but the problem is he doesn’t have much choice – he’s either a cheat or an idiot. If he took part in the scheme, he was cheating, if he didn’t suspect anything, he’s an idiot. The only thing I might have a little hope of is that maybe he is so, so so arrogant that Briatore and Symonds actually convinced him that he could make a lot of overtaking and get in at lap 12, not for winning the race, but for drawing the cameras for 12 laps and making the sponsors happy. Then he won after a “very lucky” 12 laps because he’s Alonso and god is with him. But I don’t think even he is so self centered and blindly arrogant to pull this story off.

      • S Hughes said on 17th September 2009, 12:07

        Totally agree Keith, but Nando may not have the acting skills Brando to pull that off.

      • I think the smart thing for Alonso to do right now, assuming he is innocent, is to come forward and say “I …..

        It would be the smart thing for Alonso to do, but only if assuming he is innocent, which I don’t think is the case.

        Starting 15th on a street-track with just 14 laps worth of fuel, why would Alonso agree to such a strategy in the first place?

        Unless he received a wink from Flavio and / or Symonds while finalizing the strategy, I can’t see him taking up this strategy.

        And if he is indeed involved, he needs to come out in the open and accept his responsibility, and apologize, like Hamilton did at Malaysia.

        In my opinion, Alonso should not keep his mouth shut AT ALL. He needs to come out with his side of the story ASAP. Since, his silence would be interpreted in a myriad different ways by the paddock which could harm his chances of securing a race seat elsewhere in the future, assuming Renault withdraws from the sport, which is very very likely now.

        • S Hughes said on 17th September 2009, 14:24

          I can only conclude that Alonso must be a bit thick if he didn’t work out what had happened (unless he was in on it of course).

          • Williams4ever said on 17th September 2009, 15:13

            A fanatic is one who can’t change his mind and won’t change the subject.
            That pretty much describes all your responses when two names Hamilton and Alonso come into any discussion.
            If good to be fan of a driver, but evaluation of any situation must be balanced. The Logic if it is driver A everything is right and if it is driver B everything is wrong and vice-versa is flawed logic, which you seem to apply in all your posts related to these two drivers….

        • Williams4ever said on 17th September 2009, 15:10

          His team had tried aggressive strategies before and after Singapore and sometimes they did stick… Everyone has harped on this possibility zillion times on this and many many other forums. So enough of that He must have known theory.

      • you must mean wasn’t, right?

    • I agree that would be lovely… but until we reassign heaven knows how many wins and podiums attained on a dubious basis, Alonso would be setting himself up for a metaphorical kicking. It would certainly be taken by many as an admission of complicity.

      I’m afraid in the real world, Bismark’s maxim of ‘Never apologise, never explain’ will get you further, and in the cut-throat world of F1, further still. Renouncing the win would be seen as a sign of weakness, and much of Alonso’s edge is, like Schumacher’s and Senna’s, built on an aura of non-compromise. At a sports psychology level, it would be harmful to his own performance. Once you start to question the morality of a situation, you extend that to future events and lose the ruthless focus required to win.

  15. Meander said on 17th September 2009, 8:36

    I think, if Alonso was in on it or not, his image is Noe finally damaged, probably beyon repair.
    If it is true that Ferrari were working out a deal with him, then I doubt that they would still want such a tarnished name in the team. Even if they have a signed deal, I’m sure there’s a clause somewhere about what happens if it is bad for their brand.
    In a way Alonso might already be heavily punished – his carreer may suffer greatly due to this.

    • hollus said on 17th September 2009, 8:55

      Alosnso’s image is certainly in a bad spot.
      He either knew about it or didn’t know about it. In both cases we are likely to never really know.
      If he was in the plot, surely there are no records, no meetings, no radio conversations, nothing to prove it.
      If he wasn’t, then of course there is nothing to prove that he was in it, but also there is nothing to prove that he wasn’t.
      Either way, most likely he can’t be proved either innocent or guilty, and a “maybe” will stick to most people’s heads.

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