Tyres to keep green stripes in 2010

Posted on | Author Keith Collantine

Bridgestone will continue its policy of using a green stripe to differentiate between its soft and hard tyre compounds during the 2010 season.

Chief engineer at Bridgestone Motorsport Jun Matsuzaki said: “We continue to support the FIA?s Make Cars Green campaign so the green stripe will remain.”

He also confirmed that Bridgestone will introduce new tyre constructions and compounds this year:

All compounds have changed from last year based on the feedback and data we gained last season as well as the rule changes for this season. The tyres are designed to be more durable for this season due to the heavier cars and different strategy options because of no more refuelling.
Jun Matsuzaki

Bridgestone will leave F1 at the end of 2010.

23 comments on “Tyres to keep green stripes in 2010”

  1. well thank goodness for that

    1. seriously tho, is there any news on who will supply once bridgestone leaves?

      1. News are that two Korean manufacturer are trying to be the tyre supplier in F1.

        1. “And the Virgin comes in early for a new set of Durex, he’s pushed too hard too early and worn his rubbers out…”

          Oh if only!

          1. There’s a ‘skid marks’ joke in there somewhere.

  2. Prisoner Monkeys
    15th January 2010, 9:25

    Good to know that the green stripes are back. I like the way that rule was made so that fans could pick out the tyre compounds. It’s only a little thing, but it goes a long way. Like the radio transmissions being broadcast.

    I hope Bridgestone resume their policy of supplying staggered compunds for 2010. I know it was stacking the races a little artifically, but I noticed the races were a little more exciting when the drivers had to use rubber that was less-than-optimal.

    There’s been a bit of controversy of late in the Australian V8 Supercars. A round of the championship in Queensland was dropped, and circuit promoters suggested that this was becase the track surface had deteriorated too far, and that the deterioration was the result of the brand-new “spint” tyre, a soft-compound rubber that was introduced for this season; a circuit in Western Australia reported the same problems. Apparently the softer rubber was pulling the asphalt surface away little by little.

    Then again, Formula 1 circuits are built to a more exacting standard (sidebar: V8s will use the full Bahrain grand prix circuit for this season rather than the very bring abridged one), so maybe it’s not a problem.

    1. Good to know that the green stripes are back

      I agree the ability to differentiate between compounds is fantastic, but why not have the stripe white? I sometimes find it hard to see the green stripe on my non-hd broadcast!

      “We continue to support the FIA’s Make Cars Green campaign so the green stripe will remain.”

      I can’t see how painting a green stripe down the tyres will make people think the cars are any more environmentally friendly. It’s like Honda painting the earth on their car for the same reason… bring back the white stripes!

      1. Prisoner Monkeys
        15th January 2010, 11:47

        but why not have the stripe white?

        Because the white stripe was in the groove of the tyres, which were always pretty deep. Now that we’re using slick tyres, a white line painted onto the rubber in the same way would only rub off.

    2. I hope Bridgestone resume their policy of supplying staggered compunds for 2010. I know it was stacking the races a little artifically, but I noticed the races were a little more exciting when the drivers had to use rubber that was less-than-optimal.

      I agree, it brought a nice balance to things. Drivers and cars with high tyre wear would have some balance with drivers and cars who couldn’t get heat into theirs, and vice-versa. Given that we’re more likely to see 1-stops with no re-fuelling, the balance would be even more…well, balanced! Rather than the 2:1 ratio of last year’s tyre use.

  3. Jonesracing82
    15th January 2010, 10:34

    i am glad that QR is gone as it’s an extremely dull track! bring back Lakeside…… will never happen but nice to dream.

    1. I believe you have the wrong site buddy… ;)

      1. I wouldn’t mind if there was more chat about different catagories. Personly I think Barbagalo is a terrible track. It’s just to small for the monster V8’s.

        1. Start a thread about it in the forum, I’m sure many would be happy to talk about V8s there :-) It’s just that the articles are always going to be about F1, given the name of the site.

    2. I find it funny it’s nicknamed “the paperclip”.

  4. Thank the lord they are green and not white. For a minute there I was doubting F1’s attitude towards climate change… phew!

    1. Nothing says “I’m doing my bit for the environment” more than putting two green stripes on 20,000 tyres every year that are each used for no more than about 45 minutes.

      If saving the environment is your bag, there’s only one thing you can do involving rubber that will significantly help matters – wear a condom!

      1. You could paint fluffy kittens on the side of each car, that would help too.

      2. If you know what the stripes are about when you see them. then you’re thinking of the campaign and thats all they want. No need to state the obvious.

  5. I do not mind that the tire stripes are green, but for God’s sake stop claiming that it is related to some kind of environmental initiative.

    I’d prefer a switch to white, red, or blue stripes if only to add some sincerity to the whole mess.

  6. How about stripes that change colour as the tyre wears? I played an ancient video game called pit-stop with this feature, that would help in ‘improving the show’.

  7. like a green stripe on cars that damage so much the enviroment would make any difference…

    it’s like advertising to eat more fruits and vegetables on the box of a chocolate cake…

    and green looks horrible…

  8. “Green tyres”… red herring…

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