2010 Malaysian Grand Prix stats and facts

Red Bull are the third different team to win in as many races this year

Red Bull are the third different team to win in as many races this year

With Ferrari, McLaren and now Red Bull taking turns to win in 2010 we’ve had three different teams win in the first three races – something which hasn’t happened in 20 years.

Read on for more stats and facts from the Malaysian Grand Prix.

Sebastian Vettel won the sixth race of his career, giving him the same number of wins as Tony Brooks, John Surtees, Jochen Rindt, Gilles Villeneuve, Jacques Laffite, Riccardo Patrese and Ralf Schumacher.

Mark Webber started from the second pole position of his career and set his fifth fastest lap.

With Webber finishing second behind his team mate Red Bull achieved their fifth one-two. Four of these saw Vettel finish ahead of Webber.

Three different teams have won the first three races of the year – the last time this happened was in 1990:

1. United States Grand Prix – Ayrton Senna, McLaren
2. Brazilian Grand Prix – Alain Prost, Ferrari
3. San Marino Grand Prix – Riccardo Patrese, Williams

The last time there was more than this was 1983, when Brabham, McLaren, Renault, Ferrari and Williams won the first five races.

Jaime Alguersuari and Nico H???lkenberg scored the first points of their F1 careers by finishing in ninth and tenth places.

Nico Rosberg put Mercedes on the podium for the first time in 55 years. Juan Manuel Fangio and Piero Taruffi finished first and second for the silver arrows in their previous incarnation in the 1955 Italian Grand Prix. That was the last appearance of the factory team in F1 until this year.

Rosberg also achieved his highest ever qualifying position and first appearance on the front row, taking second place.

Lewis Hamilton started from the lowest position he’s ever been on a grid in F1 – 20th. His previous worst was 19th at Monaco last year.

Lotus and Virgin reached Q2 for the first time this year.

Felipe Massa leads the drivers’ championship for the second time in his career. The last time came after he won the French Grand Prix in 2008.

Most laps led

Sebastian Vettel has now led more than twice as many laps in 2010 as all the other drivers put together:

Driver Laps led
Sebastian Vettel 110
Jenson Button 33
Fernando Alonso 16
Mark Webber 4

Most podium finishes

Driver Podiums
Felipe Massa 2
Fernando Alonso 1
Lewis Hamilton 1
Jenson Button 1
Robert Kubica 1
Mark Webber 1
Nico Rosberg 1
Sebastian Vettel 1

Average position change in 2010

The average number of places a driver has gained or lost from the start to the end of a race for all the races so far in 2010.

Driver Position change
Mark Webber -3.33
Nico H???lkenberg -3.00
Adrian Sutil -1.50
Rubens Barrichello -1.33
Michael Schumacher -1.00
Sebastian Vettel -0.50
Nico Rosberg 0.00
Sebastien Buemi +0.50
Jarno Trulli +2.00
Pedro de la Rosa +2.00
Fernando Alonso +2.33
Robert Kubica +2.33
Jenson Button +4.33
Vitantonio Liuzzi +4.50
Felipe Massa +5.33
Jaime Alguersuari +5.33
Heikki Kovalainen +6.00
Lewis Hamilton +6.67
Bruno Senna +7.00
Karun Chandhok +8.50
Lucas di Grassi +10.00
Vitaly Petrov No classified finishes
Kamui Kobayashi No classified finishes
Timo Glock No classified finishes

Over to you

Spotted any more interesting facts and stats from the Malaysian Grand Prix? Share them in the comments below…

2010 Malaysian Grand Prix

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172 comments on 2010 Malaysian Grand Prix stats and facts

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  1. yuyiluoye said on 5th April 2010, 8:19

    And the Virgin Racing finished race for the first time. So did Bruno.

    • Mike said on 5th April 2010, 9:21

      Must have nursed the fuel all race, anyone have info on that?

      • They said on the commentary that they were being lean with the fuel so that they could get the car to the finish.

      • Patrickl said on 5th April 2010, 22:21

        At the end of the race Di Grassi was really slowing down to save fuel. He was doing lap times in the 1:50′s.

        Pretty similir to what Massa was doing last year in Spain, but Di Grassi started a bit sooner so he only needed to go about 5 seconds a lap slower to save enough fuel.

        Guess the safety car helped too.

  2. James Bolton said on 5th April 2010, 8:41

    I’ve found a few!
    The last time the eventual World Champion failed to win one of the first three races was in 2003.
    Consistent qualifying from Michael Schumacher – 7th, 7th, 8th.
    But it’s the fifth race in a row that he’s been outqualified by his team mate, including last two races of 2006 (although he had a technical issue in Brazil 06).
    This weekend had the biggest laptime gap between first and second in qualifying since the 2005 Australian Grand Prix.
    Red Bull achieved their third pole in a row.
    Force India have got a car into the top ten of qualy in 5 of the last 6 races.

    • callum w said on 5th April 2010, 12:49

      great info! was very curious about the large qualifying gap between pole and P2 :]

    • Matt said on 5th April 2010, 12:55

      “Juan Manuel Fangio and Piero Taruffi finished first and second for the silver arrows in their previous incarnation in the 1955 Italian Grand Prix. That was the last appearance of the factory team in F1 until this year.”

      Why the hell did Mercedes quit F1 if they were doing so well?! That’s like McLaren quitting the sport today after scoring a 1 – 2 at Malaysia yesterday!

      • DanThorn said on 5th April 2010, 13:07

        Because of the 1955 Le Mans disaster that year. A Mercedes driven by Pierre Levegh left the track at high speed, killing the driver and over 80 spectators, as well as a further 100 injuries.

      • Keith Collantine (@keithcollantine) said on 5th April 2010, 13:20

        Their sports car team had been involved in a crash in the Le Mans 24 Hours which killed around 80 spectators plus their driver.

      • MEmo said on 5th April 2010, 19:25

        McLaren got the 1-2 at Malaysia? Wow, they are great… wait a minute…

        • Nice info James :) thnx :)
          About P1 and P2 is good, but first fact is wrong…
          Matt u should read autosport history :)

  3. disjunto said on 5th April 2010, 8:45

    To all the people out there that seem to know every stat in the history of F1. Have we ever had more than 3 races in a row where the winner did not start on the front row?

    • Bleu said on 5th April 2010, 9:17

      Many times, even last year.

      Hungaroring – Hamilton from 4th
      Valencia – Barrichello from 3rd
      Spa – Räikkönen from 6th
      Monza – Barrichello from 5th

  4. Giuseppe said on 5th April 2010, 8:45

    Fact or Fiction i wonder how Alonso stayed on Massa’s tail with a broken clutch. At one time he set the fastest lap of the race!!

    • Mike said on 5th April 2010, 9:31

      First I thought you were bagging Massa, but I worked it out eventually, Alonso obviously had a problem, you could here it when he entered the corners quite clearly, and from the sound it was fairly easy to deduce it was a problem on downshifting that did prevent him from getting power to the wheels during that time.

      That being said I saw this on a small TV in a dodgy hotel in the middle of no where. So I could be very, very wrong….

      • Daffid said on 5th April 2010, 12:22

        From what Alonso said after it was more serious than I imagined with no clutch and having to hit the throttle hard to shift down. Scary, no wonder he considered it his hardest ever race

        • macahan said on 5th April 2010, 13:47

          Yeah you could hear it pretty obviously during downshift when you where on the onboard camera view. More then likely this problem would be my guess was what actually killed his engine. He just pressed really hard with a late break and hard downshift for corner 1 and then smoke. My guess neutral kicked in and when car got back in gear had to much rev and just shreeded.

      • sato113 said on 5th April 2010, 15:35

        luckily it wasn’t on the upshifting! that would have been worse.

      • Gilvan said on 5th April 2010, 15:36

        You could HEAR IT when he entered the corners, not here it. Sorry I know I am being pedantic, can’t help it.

    • Pawel said on 5th April 2010, 18:10

      I’m pretty sure F1 cars don’t normally use the clutch to change gears. They should also not be able to accidentally catch neutral while going through the gears. A sequential box would have to downshift to neutral through all the gears (assuming the box was in high gear).

      Correct me if I’m wrong but the F1 gearbox should work very similarly to a street bike transmission.

  5. Xanathos said on 5th April 2010, 9:25

    We’ve had eight different drivers on the Podium so far, as much as during the whole 2007 season.

    • sato113 said on 5th April 2010, 15:36

      very nice stat!

    • GeeMac said on 6th April 2010, 7:41

      I think we all expected the battle for the title to be an 8 way fight…it just seems like no one has told Robert Kubica that he is taking the spot Michael Schumacher was supposed to be in!

  6. NomadIndian said on 5th April 2010, 9:36

    The one stat relevant to me was that this was the first race in 10+ years that I was watching live and switched off with 20 laps remaining… to go to sleep!

    With no hopes of rain and no exciting battles (except the HAM and PET skirmish) I did not want to sacrifice a rare Sunday siesta for another Bahrain-like bore…

    I did not learn the result till today and was not surprised to find the same top-10 barring ALO’s retirement.

    Yes, I may have missed HAM vs. SUT and it was not the most boring race in these many years but the point is that in the absence of rain, the expectation of a dull race is so certain now and barring retirements the top order does not change…

    • Keith Collantine (@keithcollantine) said on 5th April 2010, 9:47

      Well, you missed Massa getting past Button, and you missed Alonso passing Button, losing the place and then having his locomotive-like engine failure.

    • Kester said on 5th April 2010, 10:08

      I couldn’t disagree more, that race was far from boring, and if you thought that you are probably watching F1 for the wrong reasons.

      • Lachie said on 5th April 2010, 12:22

        The problem is it was a very familiar race. It seems like nowadays whoever gets through turn 1 can pretty much be assured of a cruise to the flag. Leader gains time slowly on second place, third and maybe sometimes fourth lag behind in their own uneventful race (how many times did we see Rosberg or Kubica and when we did were they doing anything interesting) and then you might get some action in the midfield when we want it up front.

        Had it not been for a spark plug in Bahrain and a drop of rain in Australia the first two races would have plaued out exactly the same as did many races last year as did many races for the last decade.

        • Lachie said on 5th April 2010, 12:25

          In addition I just point out that had Webber gotten thru turn 1 first I just can’t see the race playnig out any differently, he’d have the clean air so pull out the gap on Vettel. Had the McLaren’s qualified better then it would have been Hamilton or Button cruising in an uneventful third and fourth, the only way their was action was because Hamilton was cutting thru lesser cars and drivers

        • NomadIndian said on 5th April 2010, 13:30

          Yes but the races in the last decade would perhaps have had some changes in the front runners because of pit-strategy, a lone overtaking move, …

          My point is that its more predictible than usual. Like you said, in the first two races too, the top order after the first lap would have remained unchanged had it not been for spark-plugs and brakes(or whatever it was)… The drop of rain is the only thing that can ensure some close racing nowadays…

    • John H said on 5th April 2010, 12:50

      Nomad, I believe The National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing is the series for you.

      I thought it was a great dry F1 race personally.

      • NomadIndian said on 5th April 2010, 13:34

        haha, I would’nt go that far… just wanted to highlight the already known fact that there is hardly any overtaking in dry races… although I did miss the two that Keith pointed out…

        • macahan said on 5th April 2010, 13:55

          ohh there was plenty of overtaking. Ferraris on McLarens, MacLarens on Ferraris, Renault on McL, McL on Renault, STR on Renault, STR on Williams, Lotus on Virgin an more.
          Sure there was NO overtaking after second corner on the top 5 runners. When your leading it’s easy to control the race especially if your fastest as well. With quali the way it is the first corner and incidents is the only thing that going to determine podium finish position pretty much.

          • James G said on 5th April 2010, 17:51

            Ultimately, if you put the fastest cars at the front and the slowest cars at the back with similar fuel loads, strategies and tires, you can’t expect much overtaking in a dry race.

            I agree with Keith on almost everything and have a great deal of respect for his knowledge and insight, but the two main areas where I don’t are with the Medals system and reverse grids. I think that reverse grids would make for exciting wheel to wheel racing, lots of overtaking and a closer title battle.

          • Patrickl said on 5th April 2010, 22:25

            I don’t think anyone argues with you that reversed grids makes for exciting races.

            It’s just that that’s not true racing and I’m with Keith that that is something that we shouldn’t have in F1.

            I’d rather they pull lottery tickets from a hat instead. At least that would be fair.

          • Matt said on 8th April 2010, 13:53

            They use reverse grids in V8 Supercars (or used to in the past) and they are rubbish…

            Its like Pamela Anderson – the boobs might look good but you know they aren’t real. Yeh I’d prefer lottery tickets out of a hat

        • John H said on 5th April 2010, 14:15

          I guess so, but F1 is not the X-Factor it is a sport. Unfortunately Bernie wants as many viewer as possible and hence the former applies.

          Thankfully Alonso’s comments reflected this recently and hence my reaction to comments if they find 20 laps boring!

          • MEmo said on 5th April 2010, 20:16

            First of all, Nascar is boring as hell! Is there overtaking? Well, you almost don´t get to see it since all cars look the same and all run tidy and arranged in the two rows in the little ovals over and over and over and over… a real sedative! I gave it a shot and after 5 laps I had enough! The Malaysian race was not like Abu or Bahrain, wasn´t great, but not a total bore…

    • sato113 said on 5th April 2010, 15:37

      because it was early morning?

    • James said on 5th April 2010, 22:04

      I have to admit I did drift off a little during this time, although that was just down to my tiredness following a 75 hour week and due to the comfort of my bed!

      Race was pretty good overall, although if grid hadnt been jumbled up in the way it had then I feel it would have been a boring race like Bahrain. I still have faith in F1 though, and I’n sure there shall be excellent races without rain this year (by 2009/2010 standards, Malaysia this year was a good/great race IMO, a 6/10)

    • If f1 is so boring then don’t watch it.It’s clearly not the sport for you?

  7. MattB said on 5th April 2010, 9:53

    Keith, could you add above that Patrese was driving for Williams in 1990? Cheers and keep up the good work!

  8. Sumedh said on 5th April 2010, 9:55

    Massa leads the world championship without even having led a single lap!!

    2 teams have notched up 1-2 wins this season.

    If Mclaren or Mercedez manage a 1-2 sometime later, it will be the first time since (I don’t know when) that 3 teams scored a 1-2 in a single season.

    We could have had that in 2008, but Lewis and Heikki never scored a 1-2 then.

    • and don’t forget that Bourdais may well have had the pace to have made it a STR 1-2 in Monza had he not had his problem at the start. But then again IF is a big word in Formula 1….

    • David A said on 5th April 2010, 22:10

      In 1998, Ferrari, Jordan and Mclaren all got 1-2 finishes.

      • Harvs said on 6th April 2010, 1:04

        Heikki and Lewis were never on the podium together, Nevermind scoring a 1-2

        • David A said on 6th April 2010, 1:34

          You are right, but I was talking about Hakkinen and Coulthard ;)

        • Heikki and Lewis actually were on the podium together, it was even a 1-2, but it was back in 2007 when Heikki was in Renault.

          • btw last time when 2 british drivers were on podium together was Irvine&Coulthard in 1999. So if Mclaren scores one-two win they will stop this… ”black stat” for british :)
            So that means Lewis has never been on podium with Heikki, and also never with Jenson. BTW Have Heikki and Jenson been together on podium?

          • Nope. Heikki was on the podium four times in his career. He shared the podium with:
            - Raikkonen (thrice)
            - Kubica (twice)
            - Hamilton
            - Vettel
            - Glock

          • ok we get it, but in english there are no such word like thrice. U have to say three times, but I know im too pedantic

  9. Oli said on 5th April 2010, 10:04

    The last time there were 3 ferarri engine faliures in a race was

    Australia 2008 – massa, bourdais, raikkonen

    Malaysia 2010 – de la rosa, kobayashi, alonso

  10. Ben said on 5th April 2010, 10:13

    Sauber still yet to finish a race post-BMW.

    • Ben said on 5th April 2010, 10:16

      whoops, my mistake. PDLR did manage to get home in Australia. My apologies.

      1/6 isn’t so flash though, even Hispania with their zero testing are doing better than that.

      • NomadIndian said on 5th April 2010, 13:41

        Is it just me or does Peter Sauber look more tense on the pitwall each race. His body language after KOB was out was quite depressed. Is Sauber the team that Todt needs to have a stand-by entry for, in 2011?

        • Xanathos said on 5th April 2010, 15:31

          If they continue like that, yes. No sponsors, Budget just for 2010, that’s not enough. And the car is not on TV often enough since they don’t last that long, so there is no CEO of a big company watching the race and thinking “If I had our name on there…”

          • Magnificent Geoffrey said on 5th April 2010, 16:16

            I would be beyond gutted if the Sauber team are forced to pull out of the sport. Let’s hope they find some long-term investors as soon as possible!

        • George said on 5th April 2010, 18:18

          Yeah, he didn’t look happy yesterday, plus he said when he took over the team he didn’t really want to do it.

  11. James Bolton said on 5th April 2010, 10:17

    Jenson Button has finished 28 of the previous 29 races -only his lap one crash in Belgium last year resulting in a retirement.

  12. yeang said on 5th April 2010, 10:17

    first time a senna finished a formula one race since australia 1993!

  13. Michael said on 5th April 2010, 10:23

    Am I the only person that sees the fundamental issues still remaining in F1. None of the top 5 cars could overtake at all. Had the grid not been mixed up there would have been another processional race with only the pits to change things up at all.

    Massa did get past Button when the tyres were in their graining phase but they would all have had the same strategy if the qualifying was not a mess from Ferrari and McLaren, so I doubt there would have been any overtaking at all at the front.

    • Lachie said on 5th April 2010, 13:06

      Completely agree Michael.

    • George said on 5th April 2010, 18:19

      I think the problem was the Red Bulls were so much faster than any of the cars near them, if the McLarens and Ferrari’s had been at the front too there might have been more action up there

    • Pawel said on 5th April 2010, 18:23

      But none of the top 5 cars in this race had the pace to overtake! These cars wren’t exactly stuck behind one another.

      If Qualifying goes well then there shouldn’t be much overtaking. These cars are all different so if they line up on the grid according to speed, how can you expect them to overtake in the race.

      I would have said that none of the top cars deserved to overtake.

    • Patrickl said on 5th April 2010, 22:32

      It’s not really a problem. It’s just the way things have been for just about the last 2 decades.

      We saw that fight can occur and that even overtaking is possible. Of course when there is not much speed difference then not. So what? It’s not like the cars should be able to just breeze past when there is the smallest of speed difference.

      The OWG set as a target that 1.5s a lap time difference (in Barcelona) shoild be enough to reasonably overtake. If you make the difference less then it becomes too easy.

      Massa was 2 seconds a lap faster than Button and eventually he got past Button. So maybe it’s slightly more than 1.5 seconds right now, but Massa isn’t much of an overtaker either.

    • Maciek said on 6th April 2010, 16:22

      You cannot know what the race would have been like if the Ferraris and McLarens would have started from more habitual positions. It’s pointless to say that the race would have been processional if not for the mixed-up grid – for all we know it might have been better.

  14. All races this year were won from 2nd row on the grid.

  15. Senna qualified 23rd in every race this year

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