2010 Turkish Grand Prix stats and facts

Ferrari's 800th start was a race to forget for the Scuderia

Ferrari's 800th start was a race to forget for the Scuderia

Ferrari didn’t have much to celebrate in their 800th Grand Prix start. Read on for more facts and stats from the Turkish Grand Prix.

Lewis Hamilton won a race for the first time in 2010. It was the 12th victory of his career, meaning he has now won as many races as Mario Andretti, Alan Jones and Carlos Reutemann.

Hamilton also reached the podium for the 30th time in his career. With Jenson Button finishing second it was the 46th one-two for McLaren.

Hamilton is the fifth different driver to win in seven races. Last year only two different drivers won the first seven races – Button claiming six of them. Six different drivers won races in 2009.

Red Bull’s domination of qualifying continued with their seventh pole position in as many races. It was the third pole position in a row for Mark Webber, who now has five pole positions to his name, putting him level with Giuseppe Farina, Chris Amon, Clay Regazzoni, Patrick Tambay and Keke Rosberg.

Webber and Felipe Massa kept up their runs of scoring in every race so far this year.

A late effort from Vitaly Petrov secured the first fastest lap of his career and the first ever by a Russian driver. He is the 119th different driver to have set a fastest lap in the history of Formula 1.

Kamui Kobayashi scored his first point of 2010 and the first point for Sauber post-BMW. This was also the first time both C29s made it to the finish this year.

Ferrari marked their 800th Grand Prix start. The Italian team have started more races than any other – by comparison McLaren have racked up 672 starts, Williams 541.

Lotus have started 498 in their two incarnations combined and should reach their 500th in the European Grand Prix.

From their 800 starts Ferrari have achieved 211 wins, 203 pole positions and 220 fastest laps.

Laps led

Driver Laps led
Mark Webber 185
Sebastian Vettel 110
Jenson Button 74
Fernando Alonso 18
Lewis Hamilton 18
Nico Rosberg 16

Laps complete

Pos Driver Laps completed
1 Mark Webber 421
1 Felipe Massa 421
1 Robert Kubica 421
4 Nico Rosberg 420
4 Jaime Alguersuari 420
6 Lewis Hamilton 419
6 Fernando Alonso 419
8 Michael Schumacher 374
9 Adrian Sutil 372
10 Rubens Barrichello 370
11 Sebastian Vettel 369
12 Jenson Button 345
13 Vitantonio Liuzzi 318
14 Karun Chandhok 308
15 Vitaly Petrov 305
16 Heikki Kovalainen 295
17 Jarno Trulli 288
18 Nico H???lkenberg 280
19 Sebastien Buemi 278
20 Bruno Senna 231
20 Lucas di Grassi 231
22 Timo Glock 198
23 Pedro de la Rosa 190
24 Kamui Kobayashi 168

Podiums

Driver Podiums
Mark Webber 4
Sebastian Vettel 3
Lewis Hamilton 3
Jenson Button 3
Felipe Massa 2
Nico Rosberg 2
Fernando Alonso 2
Robert Kubica 2

Average finishing position

Pos Driver Average finishing position
1 Sebastian Vettel 3.20
2 Jenson Button 4.00
3 Mark Webber 4.57
4 Lewis Hamilton 5.29
5 Fernando Alonso 5.43
6 Felipe Massa 5.43
7 Robert Kubica 5.57
8 Nico Rosberg 5.86
9 Michael Schumacher 7.67
10 Adrian Sutil 8.67
11 Vitantonio Liuzzi 10.60
12 Rubens Barrichello 10.83
13 Kamui Kobayashi 11.00
14 Jaime Alguersuari 11.29
15 Vitaly Petrov 11.50
16 Pedro de la Rosa 11.50
17 Sebastien Buemi 13.25
18 Heikki Kovalainen 14.00
19 Nico H???lkenberg 14.40
20 Karun Chandhok 16.00
21 Bruno Senna 16.00
22 Jarno Trulli 16.50
23 Lucas di Grassi 17.33
24 Timo Glock 18.00

Spotted any more interesting facts and stats from the Turkish Grand Prix? Post them in the comments below.

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89 comments on 2010 Turkish Grand Prix stats and facts

  1. TommyC said on 31st May 2010, 7:16

    the ‘laps led’ stat really shows red bull’s underperformance. they should be miles ahead. oh well. i think it’s the first race at turkey where there’s been more than 10 people in the main straight grand stand…

    • Scribe said on 31st May 2010, 13:04

      I think that if you look at the distance to the leader graphic on the analysis page it shows that the Redbulls are now being caught.

      First it will be on tracks like this that suit the McLaren, but the McLaren does seem to be getting faster everywhere, the McLaren could again be the fastest car in Canada.

      Still Redbull should still win this championship, turn 8 proved that, unless McLarens RD department goes insane or something.

    • US_Peter said on 31st May 2010, 17:53

      The main reason RedBull isn’t miles ahead after that number of laps led is down to Vettel’s mechanical issues in the first two races, where he racked up a good portion of those laps and then had failures that lost him the win. They’re definitely starting to lose some of their advantage now as well, and are probably really kicking themselves for not having had better reliability to capitalize on their early season advantage. I expect their overall advantage may jump back up however once they perfect their f-duct…

  2. Harv's said on 31st May 2010, 7:51

    Vettel scored his first, “Biggest Douche of the Race” Award.

    • TommyC said on 31st May 2010, 9:51

      no, no, he scored one of those at fuji 07 too.

      • Stephen said on 31st May 2010, 10:59

        No, that was the race where Hamilton earned one of his many awards.

        • Calum said on 31st May 2010, 14:24

          What do you mean, Lewis got pole, flap and the win, not a bad race at all for him Japan 2007.

          • Einar AI said on 31st May 2010, 14:42

            Yeah but most of his rivals accused him of swerving behind the safety car. webber and vettel later also hinted that hamilton was partially to blame for their collisons as he braked early and stacked up the cars behind him in treacherous conditions.

          • Icthyes said on 31st May 2010, 20:05

            Einar Ai:

            They’re not exactly likely to blame themselves are they?

        • Icthyes said on 31st May 2010, 20:06

          Yup, a Perfect Race award ;-)

  3. Lustigson said on 31st May 2010, 7:56

    Having 5 different winners in 7 Grands Prix, does that have some sort of statistical value in itself.

    I only checked the 1982 season, just now, which is known for its multitude of winners, and that has the same number of winners after the same number of Grands Prix. Pretty impressive for the class of 2010.

    By the way, looking at the top 4 teams, and the drivers there who haven’t won a race as of yet, we could at least still witness victories for Massa, Schumacher, Rosberg, and outsider Kubica.

    That would give us a total of 9 winners — not a record, but still the highest since that same 1982 season.

    • Terry Fabulous said on 31st May 2010, 10:41

      Nice Research Mate

    • sato113 said on 31st May 2010, 12:25

      i’m afraid it’s nothing new. in 2008 we had 5 different winners from 7 gps on a few occasions. from Germany to Singapore (7 races) there was HAM, MAS, KOV, VET, ALO.
      and hungary to japan (7 races) KOV, MAS, VET, ALO, HAM.

    • sato113 said on 31st May 2010, 12:35

      and see Enigma’s stat below. (6 winners in 6 races in 2009)

  4. Bleu said on 31st May 2010, 8:11

    * Hamilton’s FL was only 12th fastest – what I could find that was 2nd lowest ever for winning driver. Sebastian Vettel had 14th fastest lap at Monza 2008.

    * The podium was all-English speaking. I wasn’t able to find when was the previous occasion of that happening. Brits had several podium sweeps in 1960s but after that there have been Jones, Scheckter, Hulme, Andretti and few others driving.

    Anyway, previous single-language podium was at Spanish GP 1997 when Jacques Villeneuve won, Olivier Panis was second and Jean Alesi 3rd, so it was all-French.

    * Wasn’t it first ever podium for a driver wearing earrings? ;)

    • In Indy 500 yesterday top 8 drivers were English speaking.

    • Ned Flanders said on 31st May 2010, 12:22

      Great work on the podium stats. I was wondering the same thing too. 3 Union Jacks (of varying sizes) on the podium too… yes Australia, we still own a quarter of you!

      • Hamish said on 31st May 2010, 12:47

        Give it 10 years mate. The commonwealth prescence/relevance in Australia is virtually non existant.

      • Calum said on 31st May 2010, 14:26

        Mark lives in Britain, unlike the two British drivers :P

      • Palle said on 31st May 2010, 22:10

        This is why Vettel and Webber collided: Vettel is used to drive in the right side of the road, whereas Webber is used to drive in the wrong side of the road;-)

    • ciaran said on 31st May 2010, 17:32

      Yesterday was the first time since 1977 that the podium was made up of english speaking drivers.1977 US East GP featured Hunt,Andretti and Scheckter though english is not the offical language of south africa.france the same year featured andretti,watson and hunt.

      • Harv's said on 1st June 2010, 5:17

        Im pretty sure everone on the grid can speak English, there were however 3 union jacks on the podium though.

  5. Last year there were 6 different winners in 6 races. Button in Turkey, Vettel in Britain, Webber in Germany, Hamilton in Hungary, Barrichello in Valencia and Raikkonen at Spa.

  6. wasiF1 said on 31st May 2010, 9:15

    When is the last time the two team mates took each other out of the race & ruined a potential 1-2 finish?

    If I remember correctly then in 2005 in the USA GP the Ferrari drivers, Schumacher & Barrichello did had get together when Schumi came out of his second pit stop & had a wheel locked into the first corner & nearly had a collision with Rubens, luckily Rubens was forced to out of the track into turn 1 but they finished 1-2 when there were only 6 cars were running as the 14 Michelin runner decided not to race. That was the race that cracked the relationship between Barrichello with Ferrari & Schumacher.

  7. Wanon said on 31st May 2010, 9:16

    First all native English speaking podium since the 1972 Canadian Grand Prix where the podium was comprised of Jackie Stewart, Peter Revson and Denny Hulme.

    I’m assuming Mario Andretti (1977 in France with John Watson and James Hunt) and Jacques Villeneuve (1997 in Hungary with Johnny Herbert and Damon Hill) are not native English speakers despite racing for the United States and Canada.

    • sato113 said on 31st May 2010, 12:55

      I know VIL’s first language would be french but surely Andretti’s first language is english?!

      • He was born in Italy, though, so presumably his first language was Italian.

        • US_Peter said on 31st May 2010, 18:00

          … and even now Andretti has a bit of an accent still. His kids and grandkids are thoroughly American, but he’s arguably an Italian first and foremost.

  8. Jelle van der Meer said on 31st May 2010, 9:30

    Lewis has now surpassed Michael Schumacher with highest avg points per race (excl drivers with less than 10 races), Lewis is now 1st with 5.76, Schumacher 2nd with 5.45, Fangio 3rd with 4.80, Alonso 4th with 4.46 and Vettel 5th with 4.06

    Lewis podium % is now again above 50%, only Schumacher has a higher % of active drivers with 59.9% (was 61.6% before his comeback). Unbeatable is Fangio with 68.6%

    Schumacher is now 2nd most experienced driver with 257 races behind Barrichello at 294

    Schumacher passed the 1.400 career point mark, having 1401 points more than double of any other active driver, Prost is 2nd with 799 points.

    It is Vettels 3rd retirement from leading position this year (Bahrain, Australia and Turkey)

    • Jean said on 31st May 2010, 10:34

      Maybe an interesting statistic to some , but I fail to see what it proves ? For instance , If Schumacher had not stuck with Ferrari for 96-2000 , and driven for a winning team instead , he could have won many more races , but then may have won much less from 2000-2005. Same with Lewis , if he left McL next year , took a long term view with say , Sauber , maybe he would not win much for next three years ?

      • Icthyes said on 31st May 2010, 20:12

        Not this again.

        If Ferrari weren’t so dominant in 2001, 2002, and 2004, Schumacher’s would not be as high.

        The McLaren last year wasn’t exactly that good either.

    • George said on 31st May 2010, 10:51

      Schumi would need 1599 to more than double Prost’s tally, but interesting he’s over 1400 :)

      • Jelle van der Meer said on 1st June 2010, 9:25

        Correct, that is why I specified:
        more than double of any other ACTIVE driver

    • Journeyer said on 31st May 2010, 10:54

      This is hard to assess. Remember, the 25-points-for-a-win scheme will skew this badly. Any points records are irrelevant now, really.

      • Xanathos said on 31st May 2010, 11:02

        It’s been for some time already. On all those points-per-race statistics, Schumacher has already had a big disadvantage compared to Alonso or Hamilton by the pre-2003 points system. The only thing that you can see there is that Fangio did a really awesome job…

    • Keith Collantine (@keithcollantine) said on 31st May 2010, 11:44

      I think the only way you could make that points statistic meaningful is if you turned it into percentage of available points scored.

      But even then it would be preferential to today’s drivers, who can pick up a higher percentage of points for finishing in lower positions than their predecessors could.

      To be honest, when it comes to comparing drivers’ performances across multiple seasons, points are best avoided.

      • US_Peter said on 31st May 2010, 18:03

        Another way to compare would be to apply today’s points to all past GPs. That may be a bit disingenuous though.

      • Icthyes said on 31st May 2010, 20:14

        Or you could just compare finishing positions.

      • Icthyes said on 31st May 2010, 20:15

        Or you could just compare finishing positions.

        Also, the percentage of podiums has meaning across the many seasons of F1.

  9. Gustav said on 31st May 2010, 9:37

    I haven’t verified this, but the commentators on danish television said that when Hamilton was re-overtaking Button, the difference between them was 0.000 seconds as they crossed the finish line. I don’t think that has ever been seen before.

    • JBolton said on 31st May 2010, 10:31

      In qualifying for the 1997 European Grand Prix the first three were seperated by 0.000 seconds.
      It was Villenueve, Schumacher and Frentzen in the 1997 Championship decider. Epic stuff!

      • James_mc said on 31st May 2010, 11:24

        JBolton – That was a FANTASTIC qualifying session, pretty unbelievable, and a great way to finish the end of the 1997 season!

        • JBolton said on 1st June 2010, 21:26

          And Damon Hill was very close behind, if he hadn’t made an error on his quick lap he would have snatched the pole – in an Arrows Yamaha! Albeit with the preferable Bridgestone tyres.

    • Journeyer said on 31st May 2010, 10:55

      Yup, this is true. I saw it myself on F1.com LT.

      • James_mc said on 31st May 2010, 11:25

        Funnily enough I was watching the T.V. not my computer screen, Hahahahaha! :-D

        Watching it again, I can see why this result was given!

    • I don’t think it was 0.000. Hamilton was right behind Button at that point I think, but they were so close it was 0.0, which means probably means less than 0.050.

      • Patrickl said on 31st May 2010, 21:54

        Indeed. When you look at the replay Button is at least half a car length ahead of Hamilton when they cross the line.

        Looking at the speeds on the finish line from the FIA site, they give a 245kph as maximum speed. That equals to less than 7cm per thousandth of a second or 68cm per hundreth of a second.

        So I cannot imagine that there was less than one hundreth of a second between them.

        Something seriously weird going on there with the timing.

        • Keith Collantine (@keithcollantine) said on 31st May 2010, 23:52

          The timing line and the start/finish line aren’t always in the same place, could that be it?

          • DanThorn said on 1st June 2010, 8:50

            If it transpires that they were literally neck and neck across the line, then who is credited with having led that lap?

          • Patrickl said on 1st June 2010, 20:36

            Hamilton is still behind Button when they enter turn 1.

            Here is a screenshot of both of them just after they passed the line:
            http://www.flickr.com/photos/49814849@N06/4661073966/

            My company writes software that works with these AMB transponders and the sensor line is always exactly on the start/finish line. What would be the point of moving it?

            In the case that both are exactly on the same time I think the one that is coming from behind is considered faster and is then credited with the position. Not sure if they use the same rule in F1 though.

  10. PeterG said on 31st May 2010, 9:38

    Keith, do you have speed trap data? Top speed is very interesting for the upcoming Canadian GP.

    • Keith Collantine (@keithcollantine) said on 31st May 2010, 11:45

      I posted them in the practice and qualifying notes – McLaren were miles ahead.

      The data for the race is more likely to be skewed by people slipstreaming, though.

      • Calum said on 31st May 2010, 14:29

        I was surprised to see the HRT cars high up, is that just because their downforce is so bad?

        • David A said on 31st May 2010, 16:31

          Perhaps, a bit like Force India challenging for the wins and poles at Belgium and Italy last year.

  11. Chris P said on 31st May 2010, 9:41

    Hamilton has won at least one race in each of his 4 seasons in f1.

  12. Paul Gilbert said on 31st May 2010, 10:20

    Second time that Lewis Hamilton has won a race in which Vettel and Webber collided.

    The 7 races so far in 2010 have seen 7 different drivers finish in 2nd place.

    Regarding the podium, there were only 3 colours on the podium flags (and 3 Union Flags!).

  13. Fer no.65 said on 31st May 2010, 10:39

    Schumi tied Patrese as the 2nd most experienced driver ever behind Barri.

  14. kapow said on 31st May 2010, 10:53

    Alguersuari first to try a two-stop strategy in 2010?

    • Journeyer said on 31st May 2010, 10:56

      It’s happened before. Lotsa drivers tried it in Australia.

      • Ned Flanders said on 31st May 2010, 12:33

        Yeah but that race started wet, so that was a bit different. I could see a few drivers trying it at Montreal because it has a short pitlane, and plus overtaking is (relatively) easy

        • sato113 said on 31st May 2010, 13:02

          yeah the length of the pitlane counts quite a bit when considering doing a 2 stopper. the magny cours pit lane is even shorter.

  15. AndrewT said on 31st May 2010, 10:55

    - it was Vettels 50th Grand Prix – not with the result he wished for himself…

    – Massa finished a grand prix for 100th times (finish means in this case: classified, not neccessarily went through the finish line in the last lap)

    – his friend and Brazilian fellowman Barrichello finished a grand prix for 200th times.

    – Petrov set his first ever fastest lap of the race (although he would rather have wished a pointscoring finish instead of this). Petrov managed to do this on his 7th grand prix, which is the third “soonest” scored on the current grid (Rosberg on the 1st, and Hamilton on the 2nd)

    – this was the first time this year that Hamilton was leading a race.

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