German Grand Prix: The F1 Fanatic unofficial race programme (Video)

F1 returns to the Hockenheimring for the first time in two years.

Have all the important information for this weekend?σΤιΌΤδσs German Grand Prix at your fingertips with the F1 Fanatic unofficial race programme, including a video lap of the track.

The race

German GP preview – A strong result is vital for Ferrari in Hockenheim after just four points from the last two races.

Chandhok sidelined, Senna and Yamamoto to drive for HRT in Germany – HRT switch their drivers again.

Whitmarsh expects to race new diffuser – McLaren planning to use the upgrade they took off the car at Silverstone

Di Resta not driving in Germany – Force India reserve driver to miss first practice this weekend.

Who is Germany?σΤιΌΤδσs best F1 driver? – German fans have six home drivers to cheer this weekend.

2010 German Grand Prix discussion – Are you at Hockenheim this weekend? Tell us about it here.

The track

Hockenheimering, 2010 German Grand Prix

Hockenheimring circuit information – More track data

Changing tracks: Hockenheimring – Compare the new track with the old Hockenheimring

The weather

Heavy rain fell at the track on Thursday and more is set to come in the next few days. See below for a detailed look at the forecast and links to weather radar services.

Read more: Rain likely to hit German GP weekend

Following the race live

We’ll be commenting live on the German Grand Prix from start to finish. Join us for the race, qualifying and all three practice sessions at these times:

Friday 23rd July 2010

German Grand Prix Free practice 1 ?σΤιΌΤΗ£ 10:00 ?σΤιΌΤΗ£ 11:30 (09:00 ?σΤιΌΤΗ£ 10:30)
German Grand Prix Free practice 2 ?σΤιΌΤΗ£ 14:00 ?σΤιΌΤΗ£ 15:30 (13:00 ?σΤιΌΤΗ£ 14:30)

Saturday 24th July 2010

German Grand Prix Free practice 3 ?σΤιΌΤΗ£ 11:00 ?σΤιΌΤΗ£ 12:00 (10:00 ?σΤιΌΤΗ£ 11:00)
German Grand Prix Qualifying ?σΤιΌΤΗ£ 14:00 (13:00)

Sunday 25th July 2010

German Grand Prix ?σΤιΌΤΗ£ 14:00 (13:00)

Local times with British conversions in brackets.

We’re looking for people to help run the live blogs this weekend. If you’d like to join in please get in touch by emailling me, using Twitter or leave a comment below.

More session times and live blog details here: German Grand Prix live TV times

Also make sure you follow F1 Fanatic on Twitter for updates throughout the race weekend.

2009 German Grand Prix highlights

Last year’s German Grand Prix was held at the Nurburgring as the race rotates between the two tracks.

Mark Webber scored the first victory of his F1 career in last year’s race despite getting a drive-through penalty for making contact with Rubens Barrichello at the start.

Lewis Hamilton won the last F1 race at the Hockenheimring two years ago.

2009 German Grand Prix review – Webber shrugs off penalty to grab maiden win

Rubens Barrichello lashes out after Brawn strategy costs him more points – Barrichello was frustrated at missing out on victory

Mark Webber finally wins an F1 race – It took Webber 130 races to achieve his first win – a record

Previous German Grands Prix

2008 German Grand Prix – Hamilton first despite strategy blunder
2006 German Grand Prix – Schumacher storms to Hockenheim win
2005 German Grand Prix – Alonso wins after another Raikkonen retirement

Predict the pole sitter and top five finishers in the Grand Prix for your chance to win F1 tickets, DVDs, books and more

11 comments on “German Grand Prix: The F1 Fanatic unofficial race programme (Video)”

  1. those red bull simulator videos are SWEEEET! their production easily outclasses the race broadcasts in the states.

    i like the way the german gp rotates between the different venues, and i wouldn’t mind seeing others do the same. what do you guys think?

    1. As long as they’re two good venues, that’s fine. But neither of Germany’s tracks really do it for me. They’re not bad, but they’re not special either.

      I’d like to see F1 race on the Norisring, or the Lausitzring oval. But as long as I’m dreaming they might as well use the Nordschleife.

      Japan was going to do it as well with Suzuka and Fuji but that always looked like a poor solution – skipping magnificent Suzuka every other year to go to dreary Fuji instead.

        1. two good races at Fuji

          I remember half a race spent behind the safety car and another with some memorably terrible stewarding…

          Suzuka’s spectacular though – it may not be the best track for overtaking, but it’s a great venue for F1.

          1. “I remember half a race spent behind the safety car and another with some memorably terrible stewarding…”

            2007 was one of the most incredible races of the decade. The title race combined with attrocious weather made for a an amazingly tense and dramatic race to watch. It had me gripped once the safety car pulled in. Even during the safety car we had Ferrari’s idiotic decision to use inters which nearly ended Kimi’s title hopes.

            2008 was a quality race, despite the stewarding it was still entertaining all the way through with a battle for the lead in the early stages a battle for second in the later stages, a great drive by Nelson Piquet and Massa put on a great show charging through the field.

            I agree that Suzuka is a far superior track, its the best conventional short curcuit in the world, but it has to be said Fuji produced two very entertaining grands prix.

      1. agreed its incredible how poor are the gp versions of nurburgring and hockenheim i like nurburgring but it isnt very entertaining i love classic tracks and stadium sections but the hockenheim stadium is very bumpy and tight and its needing a a “silverlift”

    2. I always tought it as a good idea, for some venues. The newer ones. They shouldn’t touch the classics obviously. Spa, Monza, Silverstone, Monaco and Suzuka should be there every year!

  2. Regarding Germany and its race tracks, I always find it interesting that for a country with as much as a motor racing tradition as France or Great Britain, there aren’t that many permanent circuits, and one could gain the impression that the Nurburgring-Nordschleife “absorbed” all interesting truth-or-dare corners.

    The Sachsenring would seem to be an interesting exception to me, which receives some attention and exposure every year because of MotoGP and friends visiting, but even Germany’s DTM hasn’t raced on the circuit for years. Instead of that, an upscaled karting track like Oschersleben is being used, and the infield of Lausitzring, which hasn’t seen a major race in its actual main configuration as an oval track ever since the almost-tragic debut in 2001, when Alex Zanardi had his serious accident. What seems to be missing almost totally are smaller, club-racing oriented venues.

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