Hamilton: Webber “in my blind spot”

Lewis Hamilton held back from blaming Mark Webber for the collision which put him out of the Singapore Grand Prix.

Speaking after the race he said:

He was in my blind spot, I didn’t even know he was still there.

I don’t know I’ll have to look at the video replay. Honestly I don’t even know what happened. I didn’t see anyone alongside me and the next thing I know my tyre’s blown and that’s it.
Lewis Hamilton

Having failed to score in three of the last four races, Hamilton has fallen to third in the championship.

Asked if he felt he could still win it he said:

I think its a tough call. There’s still four races to go but I couldn’t have expected a worse two races at this crucial point in the year.

I’ll do my best but hopefully either me or Jenson can do it.
Lewis Hamilton

Webber was able to finish the race despite the damage to his front-right wheel, and the stewards decided no penalty was in order.

Speaking in the press conference he compared the collision to Hamilton’s contact with Massa at Monza two weeks ago:

The contact was similar to what he had in Monza with Felipe. It could have easily been my front tyre that was damaged.
Mark Webber

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100 comments on Hamilton: Webber “in my blind spot”

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  1. David BR said on 26th September 2010, 15:52

    I really thought Hamilton had found legitimate space into the corner and was past, Webber could and should have braked to avoid the collision, so I think a penalty was due.

    Now ask whether Hamilton was wise to go for the position, especially against Webber. Probably not. But the way I see it, Button’s caution depends on just much as luck (counting on other drivers failing) as Hamilton’s risk-taking to secure extra points. Fact is McLaren are now uncompetitive versus RBR and Ferrari (Alonso) and there’s just no way all the other 3 drivers are going to luck out enough (or crash enough) to let either Button or Ham take the championship without the latter pushing over the limit.

    • HAM was clearly ahead of him, but he expected too much respect from Webber after passing him.

      • As a Hamilton fan, it does not feel nice but i have to shift my focus to 2011 – this one is over. If McLaren can develop a decent car they have the drivers to win the 2011 championships.

    • “Now ask whether Hamilton was wise to go for the position, especially against Webber. Probably not.”
      No, but was there any way Lewis wasn’t going to try to pass him? Knowing Lewis he was always going to go for that gap, and if he’d pulled it off it would have been one of the moves of the season. But lady luck isn’t on his side right now is she?

      • That’s a big IF. IF he was successful, no doubt it would have been great, but it was still a risky manoeuvre. Risky as in what could have happened actually happened. What I don’t get is why people are complaining that he’s out of the race. Webber’s not at fault… if anything, it’s Hamilton’s aggressive overtaking, which carried that risk.

        I don’t understand how Hamilton could say Webber was in his “blind spot”. Blind spot? He just overtook two cars, one being Webber which is not particularly slow… did he expect them to slow down after that overtake?

        • Get into a single sitter and you will get a very good understanding of what blind spot is.

          Hamilton was coming from a 45 degree angle into the corner, Webber was virtually perpendicular to the corner when they hit.

          Also the same reason why back markers find it difficult seeing cars on the lead lap. The mirrors have plenty of blind spots and also very limited view.

        • Andrewf1 said on 26th September 2010, 17:06

          Hamilton did nothing wrong, it was his chance of overtaking Webber, being aided by the safety car and the traffic. He was ahead of Webber when taking the turn, there shouldnt have been such a big IF with that manouvre.I would say Webber is to blame, but…..well, in the end i guess it can be called just a racing incident. On the other hand, later Kubica did the exact same manouvre, actually he was further behind the Force India in the turn and he didn’t get knocked out of the track.

          • Hamilton did plenty wrong and he knows by talking about ‘blind spots’. It’s an admittance that he closed the door on Webber when he wasn’t sufficiently ahead.

            He should take a lesson from Kubica on how to overtake cleanly on that corner. The Pole took a wide line and used the curb on the outside whereas Hamilton tried to cut across early.

          • Andrewf1 said on 26th September 2010, 17:17

            I think it’s more of a case of Webber taking a lesson from Sutil. And….the comment about ‘blind spots’ being used by Lewis to cover up a mistake is just absurd.

          • It’s the same situation as with Vettel in Turkey: Webber gave room but held his line and now it’s up to the other driver overtaking to make it stick without running into him.

            Neither Vettel nor Hamilton did that.

          • But of course Hamilton is a superhuman who doesn’t make mistakes.

          • Andrewf1 said on 26th September 2010, 18:45

            Hey common, i didn’t say he’s Superhuman, in Monza for example it was clearly his mistake. But in this scenario, like i said, i think he didn’t do anything wrong.

          • AK – Maybe you could take Lewis’ seat in the next race and show him how to do it.

            Typical view of an HH. Why dont you have an open mind? And comparing him to Kubica OTs today is ridiculous. He had fresh tyres and a faster car. Whereas the Mclaren is not as quick as the RBR.

            Engage brain before typing!

        • I completely agree! I think Hamilton’s driver style is just too aggressive to the current fragile F1 cars. He has frequently been very lucky and got away with it quite a few times already this year. He is always touching someone or been touched. That happened in Silverstone (he causes Vettel the puncture) and many other races this year.
          Now that his luck has gone, he is just paying for it, as we saw in Monza and now.Sorry for the Hamilton’s fans but that’s the true.

          • US_Peter (@us_peter) said on 26th September 2010, 22:02

            Hamilton needs to get in a Ferrari. They seem to hold up quite well to a couple tussles on track usually.

          • In reality to be honest I was not thinking about a Ferrari. I was thinking more about a truck racing machine!

  2. Quite a measured response.
    His body language on the walk back to the garage was quite obvious.
    It was a racing incident, but I expect the comments section to light up with angry rantings from Hamilton fans.

    • David BR said on 26th September 2010, 15:56

      Maybe. But I’ve already some F1 journalists here in Brazil who are definitely not Hamilton fans saying they thought Webber was to blame and should have been penalized.

  3. Hamilton onboard:

    >> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uBNHaNUpJ3E

    Does anyone have an onboard shot from Webber’s viewpoint? I didn’t see one during the live race coverage (at least, not up to the actual collision).

    • Haha, forget that last question – I didn’t initially notice the Webber onboard at the end of the same video clip!

    • David BR said on 26th September 2010, 16:03

      The video shows Hamilton *passes* Webber on the straight, completely. He then brakes fine for the corner (i.e. he wasn’t outbraking himself into it with the overtake) – his mistake is probably giving Webber *too much* room and not forcing him to brake earlier and keeping him behind.

  4. I’m a hamilton fan and all i can say is:

    Aryton Senna:”If you no longer go for a gap that exists…
    You are no longer a racing driver.

    • Agree. Hamilton is the most aggressive and best overtaking driver in F1 today. The closest to Senna ever. That’s why he lost so many points in the last few races but he is still there, less than a win’s difference from the leader and he is surely not out.

    • Perhaps hammy interpreted that as “If you can’t go for a gap that exists, go for a non existent one”

      • David A said on 26th September 2010, 19:22

        Except the gap did exist since he was able to get alongside and ahead going into the corner. So don’t twist Senna’s words against a fast, exciting young driver who got unlucky.

        • 99 times out of 100 it would of been a clean pass, but not today and that’s what counts. Hamilton was completely ahead at one point and 3/4 ahead in the corner. Webber braked extremely late no to concede the pace, even if Hamilton had gone a bit wider I still think Webber would of hit him, Webber wasn’t going to make that corner that fast and tight. Having said that I don’t blame Webber, he took a chance it paid off.

        • Luck had nothing to do with it, it was misjudgement and arrogance (and rather Senna-like in style) on Hamilton’s part. Like Senna in 91 alongside Mansell, Hamilton is learning a salutary lesson.

          There was no “gap”, Webber had the inside racing line and Hamilton pulled alongside but was not a car length ahead when he turned into Webber (do check the footage).
          What of Hamilton’s “blind side” comment, where did he expect Webber to be?

          • Keith Collantine (@keithcollantine) said on 26th September 2010, 22:33

            If there was no gap, how was Hamilton in front of him?

            Look, really, this was so obviously a racing incident, it’s depressing reading people taking sides over it just because they’ve decided they like one driver more than another.

          • Hamish said on 27th September 2010, 3:08

            Amen Keith. It was simply a racing incident.

          • Amen to that Keith, thank you and amen to Lewis (or any driver) in going for that gap and that gap being vigorously defended. This is racing and it’s fantastic.

            Unlucky Lewis – next pass will be a blinder :)

          • Keith, mostly LH fans tend to suspend objectivity when their boy is being criticised and I understand that, it’s perfectly natural, but it doesn’t make them right.

            However if there is the time take another look on the YouTube footage before Bernie takes it down and should you be able to identify clear air between Webber/Hamilton which could justify Hamilton turning in on Webber (who was legitimately on the racing line), then I’ll happily perform a Mea culpa.

            The least Hamilton should have done is to give Webber sufficient room, I suspect had the rolls been reversed in respect of who DNF (i.e. Webber out, Hamilton continues to 4th) Hamilton would have been penalised by the stewards.

            The “racing incident” judgement, in the circumstances was purely politic. Finally, it was Webber’s rear left tyre that was damaged in the incident, how was that if it was Webber’s right side that was struck by Hamilton?

  5. Dan Thorn (@dan-thorn) said on 26th September 2010, 15:58

    The stewards made the correct decision. Very much a racing incident – Hamilton could have left more room, but Webber could have been a bit more cautious. Also take into account the two types of drivers they are: Hamilton is a very aggressive overtaker and Webber has always been aggressive in his on track demeanour. Neither were going to simply yield, especially with so much at stake.

  6. Such a pity for Hamilton.

    A very difficult accident to discuss, who was wrong? Hamilton couldn’t do anything to avoid it I think, Webber could have braked a little bit earlier. But as with all of this accidents, it all happens so quick especially when you’re behind the steering wheel of an F1 car.

    I hope Webber didn’t grab the championship with this “racing” accident.

  7. gwenouille said on 26th September 2010, 16:00

    I think that was the right decision from the stewarts. This was just a racing incident, nothing bad or unsportsmanlike (?) from Webber…
    I am sure Hamilton can bounce back from down there. And to be honest, Button is not gonna snatch this championship that way. OK the car wasn’t as good as the 2 up front (obvious), but look at the start ! He overtook Hamilton completely, but somehow gave him 3rd place back…

  8. hawkfist said on 26th September 2010, 16:12

    It was almost exactly the same as Hamilton/Massa at Monza, except this time Hamilton is in the Massa situation. He was rightly blamed there and took responsibility.

    It was a racing incident, but it was a racing incident that Hamilton couldn’t do much about, and wasn’t to blame for.

  9. I dont think Webber had any room to do anything other than what he did. Its not like he could have braked any quicker than whats possible. Lewis gambled and it didnt pay off.

    IMO Lewis was at fault more than Webber, because 1) lewis was the one over-taking and 2) he could not see Webber, and turned in too much, giving Webber nowhere else to go.

    • You can’t blame a driver for an accident because he is the one who overtakes. And if you would do that, then Webber was the guy at fault. Hamilton were ahead into the corner. Webber therefore was overtaking Hamilton to get his position back.
      And if he couldn’t see Webber how can that be his fault? that is the mirrors on his car that is not good enough, or the rules that allows the drivers too little rear view.
      Webber could have avoided it by breaking earlier, then Hamilton would have been ahead but there would have been no accident.
      I don’t know if there should have been given a penalty or not, but i think that Hamilton were innocent in this incident.

      • Itz a sad thing. He did the same with vettel. He cudve given vettel room and let vettel pass. He didnt, they both crashed n missed out on RBR 1-2. This time too. webber didnt move out of the way n Lewis had to pay the price.

        • David BR said on 26th September 2010, 17:53

          One thing Webber has to take into account: live by the sword, die by the sword. If he’s in a fight with Alonso for the title at the end, he can’t complain if those he’s taken out this year do the same to him – in a racing incident. Hamilton swallowed this clash where he wasn’t to blame with a fair amount of discretion. Somehow can’t imagine Webber doing the same.

        • I don’t see how this and the incident in Turkey had anything to do with each other. In Turkey Webber was being overtaken, here Webber tried to overtake. Webber took a very risky move on Hamilton to recapture his position and Hamilton didn’t see him and closed the door in the face of Webber when he had nowhere to go except into Hamilton.

        • Norman Bates said on 29th September 2010, 4:23

          It wouldn’t be a race if everyone just moved aside when someone attempts to overtake.

  10. roberttty said on 26th September 2010, 16:19

    I hope this won’t deter Hamilton from future such moves…

    Hats off to his bravery

  11. foocode (@foocode) said on 26th September 2010, 16:22

    Two wrongs don’t make a right (or a left! *groan*).

    Webber went in but was too hot for the inside line and was committed before Lewis turned in.

    Hamilton didn’t need to turn in so early, slowly and sharply on that corner.

    Text-book racing incident in which both drivers were pushing too hard and both become unstuck. 50/50.

    Slight difference when comparing it to the Massa incident at Monza in that in Italy, Hamilton was aiming for a gap that wasn’t there while in this case the gap was there but Hamilton closed it pre-maturely. If Hamilton was a little further ahead here, as Massa was at Monza, Webber would have to take the blame for that mingle. He was very lucky to continue on as it was.

    Still – at least Webber seems to have used up all his bad luck over the past few years.

  12. SkinBintin said on 26th September 2010, 16:23

    A racing incident, plain and simple. Hamilton had had a great run on Webber, and would have thought he was well past him. However, leading in to the turn in, Webber was in Hamilton’s blind spot. There is no way he would have been able to see him.

    Webber had done well to have remained up inside Hamilton, and while he perhaps should have yielded, he’s a Grand Prix driver… he is paid to compete, and to win. So all in all, a racing incident. Pity it’ll cost Hamilton the championship. :(

  13. Racing incident. Again.

    And IMHO, Hamilton should learn from RK. He did the same thing without crashing.

    Still believe LH is far too impulsive, should be more mature. Even SV proved today overtaking was not worth the risk. Man, learn from Button…

    • hawkfist said on 26th September 2010, 16:34

      To be fair, Kubica was so much faster the cars weren’t challenging him that much. I’m sure if they wanted to risk what little points they had and push him similar could have happened.

    • The lesson related to the RK incident is that Webber should learn fron Sutil.

  14. I’d argue the opposite on this occasion – Hamilton couldn’t see Webber when braking / turning in, but Webber could see Hamilton.

    I think a racing incident was the right decision, but I wouldn’t put any of the blame on Hamilton for the end result.

  15. I blame the McLaren team for leaving him too long outside after it was obvious (even Martin Brundle saw it coming)that Webber was catching up fast!!

    The McLaren team seems to always make every race double difficult for LH :-( Remember they told him to have a go at Webber on restart!! While Jenson can easily cruise around.

    • bosyber said on 26th September 2010, 16:46

      Yes, that remains odd – what were they hoping for once they were both actually slower than Webber? They should have stopped right that lap, ie. at least two, three laps earlier, trying to keep Webber in sight at least. Puzzling.

      And it would have forced Alonso and Vettel to react earlier too, and there seems little doubt that Vettel could follow closer with the hard tires, so maybe then we wouldn’t have had to wait until the very last lap for them to have a real fight for the lead.

      I hope McLaren can do better next races, I want them in the WDC and WCC fight until the end please (after all, Ferrari is pretty far behind still with WCC, so w/o McLaren, Red Bull will win it easily).

      • Mclaren seems to love to push their drivers. Like last race with the tyre strategy with Button. This race too, I dunno why they waited for 3 extra laps while the tires kept degrading to call in for the pits. In fact they shldve called one of the 2 Mclarenz inside n did the exact gamble RBR did.

    • David Johnson said on 26th September 2010, 16:51

      In the BBC coverage, Button WAS told to hurry up twice…he just couldn’t do anything about Webber……As for the MW/LH incident…MW could see LH was past, he knew he’d hit him, and I think he was ever so lucky to get away with it.

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