Button scores tenth win in longest ever race

2011 Canadian GP stats & facts

Jenson Button, McLaren, Montreal, 2011

Jenson Button, McLaren, Montreal, 2011

Jenson Button won the Canadian Grand Prix by taking the lead on the last lap.

The last time that happened was the 2005 Japanese Grand Prix, when Kimi R??ikk??nen passed Giancarlo Fisichella to win.

Button was the first driver to win having only led the final lap since Fisichella’s victory in the 2003 Brazilian Grand Prix.

Nelson Piquet won the Canadian Grand Prix 20 years ago in similar fashion, passing Nigel Mansell’s stricken Williams on the final lap to claim victory.

Button became the 32nd F1 driver to score ten Grand Prix wins. He now has as many as James Hunt, Ronnie Peterson, Jody Scheckter and Gerhard Berger.

He scored his third victory for McLaren, all of which have come in races affected by rain.

And he achieved his fourth fastest lap, putting him level with Jo Siffert, Jean-Pierre Beltoise, Patrick Depailler and Jean Alesi.

No points for Alonso and Hamilton

Fernando Alonso started from the front row for the first time since Singapore last year. But his string of 12 races in the points came to an end in the race. Likewise Lewis Hamilton failed to score for the first time in ten races.

Hamilton’s failure to finish means only Button and the two Red Bull drivers have completed the race distance in every Grand Prix this year.

Pastor Maldonado and the Lotus, Virgin and HRT drivers are yet to complete a race distance this year.

Michael Schumacher equalled his best result since returning to F1 with fourth. He now has as many points in the championship as team mate Nico Rosberg.

Eighth place was Jaime Alguersuari’s best result of his career and first points of 2011.

Toro Rosso had both cars in the points for the first time since the 2009 Australian Grand Prix.

Vitantonio Liuzzi gave HRT their best-ever result with 13th place. It moves them up from last in the championship to 11th, ahead of Virgin.

Longest race ever

The 2011 Canadian Grand Prix was officially the longest race that counted towards the world championship.

Total race time (including the suspension, which does not count towards the two-hour time limit) was 4hr 4’39.537, over an hour and a quarter longer than last year’s similarly disrupted Korean Grand Prix.

Previously the longest world championship round had been the 1951 Indianapolis 500, which took 3hr 57’38.050. The longest F1 race was the 1954 German Grand Prix, which lasted 3hr 45’45.800.

Vettel’s domination

Had Vettel won, he would have equalled Michael Schumacher’s feat of six wins and one second place in the first seven races.

He may have lost the battle but he’s emphatically winning the war – see the championship points graph for evidence of that. He has led 352 of the 442 laps so far this year, 79.6% of the total.

Team mate Mark Webber is yet to lead a single one, and has only spent four laps in front of his team mate all year.

Vettel’s sixth pole position of the year was the 21st of his career. Only nine drivers in F1 history have set more pole positions than Vettel.

If he were to take pole position in all the remaining races this year – which judging by what we’ve seen so far is not out of the question – he would move up to third on the all-time list:

Most career pole positions

Driver Poles
1 Michael Schumacher 68
2 Ayrton Senna 65
3 Jim Clark 33
4 Alain Prost 33
5 Nigel Mansell 32
6 Juan Manuel Fangio 29
7 Mika Hakkinen 26
8 Niki Lauda 24
9 Nelson Piquet 24
10 Sebastian Vettel 21

Review the year so far in statistics here:

Spotted any other interesting stats and facts from the Canadian Grand Prix? Share them in the comments.

In particular, can anyone work out who was the last driver before Button to win a race having been last on at least one lap?

2011 Canadian Grand Prix

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99 comments on Button scores tenth win in longest ever race

  1. Paul Hayes said on 15th June 2011, 10:15

    We currently have more 10+ Grand Prix winners in the F1 field than there has ever been at any point in the championship’s history – seven in all, with Schumacher, Alonso, Massa, Hamilton, Barrichello, Vettel and now Button.

    http://www.mediafire.com/imgbnc.php/faf478cb1793fd40af930f13875e46bb0ab6893d7d7fe26924b42b0c9a1fbe246g.jpg

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