2012 F1 calendar trimmed to 20 races with Turkey dropped

2012 F1 calendar

Vitaly Petrov, Renault, Istanbul, 2011

No return to Istanbul for F1 in 2012

A revised 2012 F1 calendar has been revealed today, trimmed back from 21 to 20 races.

The Turkish Grand Prix, which has seen poor attendance since its introduction in 2005, has been dropped.

The Bahrain Grand Prix returns to the calendar having been dropped this year due to the civil unrest in the country. Its race is scheduled to be held on April 22nd, not at the end of the season as was previously suggested.

There are six back-to-back races: Australia and Malaysia, China and Bahrain, Germany and Hungary, Belgium and Italy, Japan and Korea and the season-concluding United States and Brazilian rounds.

Here is the calendar in full:

Round Date Race Circuit
1 March 18th Australian Grand Prix Melbourne
2 March 25th Malaysian Grand Prix Sepang International Circuit
3 April 15th Chinese Grand Prix Shanghai International Circuit
4 April 22nd Bahrain Grand Prix Bahrain International Circuit
5 May 13th Spanish Grand Prix Circuit de Catalunya
6 May 27th Monaco Grand Prix Monte-Carlo
7 June 10th Canadian Grand Prix Montreal
8 June 24th European Grand Prix Valencia
9 July 8th British Grand Prix Silverstone
10 July 22nd German Grand Prix Hockenheimring
11 July 29th Hungarian Grand Prix Hungaroring
12 September 2nd Belgian Grand Prix Spa-Francorchamps
13 September 9th Italian Grand Prix Monza
14 September 23rd Singapore Grand Prix Singapore
15 October 7th Japanese Grand Prix Suzuka
16 October 14th Korean Grand Prix Korean International Circuit
17 October 28th Indian Grand Prix Buddh International Circuit
18 November 4th Abu Dhabi Yas Marina
19 November 18th United States Grand Prix Circuit of the Americas
20 November 25th Brazilian Grand Prix Interlagos

With 20 races, the 2012 season will be the longest ever held. The new calendar was unanimously ratified by a fax vote of the FIA World Motor Sports Council.

View the 2012 F1 calendar.

2012 F1 calendar

Image ?é?® Renault/LAT

Advert | Go Ad-free

137 comments on 2012 F1 calendar trimmed to 20 races with Turkey dropped

1 2 3
  1. Is the exclusion of the Turkish GP final, or are there still negotiations ongoing? It would be a shame to lose the circuit.

  2. Dan Thorn (@dan-thorn) said on 31st August 2011, 17:48

    Wow, that’s some summer break!

    I know this isn’t the popular opinion but I won’t miss Turkey. I always thought it was a bit overrated and it doesn’t matter how good Turn 8 is, the rest of it is pants.

    It’s a shame it’s not really feasible to have the US and Canadian GP’s together too, but you can’t have everything!

    • Bob Littleroot said on 31st August 2011, 18:17

      Was a much better MotoGP track

    • Fixy (@fixy) said on 31st August 2011, 19:23

      I’m sorry for Istanbul Park, I was good at it in games ;)

    • graigchq (@graigchq) said on 1st September 2011, 0:07

      really is sad news, as realistically, Istanbul Park is Tilke’s best circuit, shame it couldn’t have been built somewhere more popular, but really is an awesome circuit

    • montreal95 (@montreal95) said on 1st September 2011, 1:38

      Disagree, the whole circuit is good not only turn 8. The elevation changes, like at downhill turn 1 and blind sweeping turn 3 make it so, not to mention the “double switchback” turns in the last sector which are beneficial for great side-by-side racing!
      The track’s there, the way it should be. Pity no one came to see it.

      • I agree, what a pity. He gets one that people actually like and then they scrap it. Poor Tilke!

      • Yeh i second that, its a lovely flowing circuit and even the final mickey mouse chicanes are enjoyable, get some nice racing through there due to the different lines that can be had.

    • Lucas "Mr. Veloce" said on 1st September 2011, 17:57

      They can’t have the Canadian and US Grands Prix back-to-back because the Texas summer is to hot.

  3. I bet the teams will love having Bahrain a week after China. That’s genius scheduling.

    • Abu Dhabi and China should swap places in my opinion.

      • Two back-to-back boring races would be insulting.

        • Nick.UK (@) said on 31st August 2011, 19:59

          China was brilliant this year!

          • PieLighter (@pielighter) said on 31st August 2011, 20:25

            No, he means Abu Dhabi then Bahrain. Two boring, oil-funded races. To be fair though, UAE looks nice. Employ Populous to do circuit modifications and it could be really good.
            For those who don’t know, Populous are the guys behind the Arena complex/track extension at Silverstone.

    • Shimks said on 31st August 2011, 18:01

      But they’ll be glad there’s one less race, I guess. Or was it never proposed that there would be 21 in one season?

    • Logic is beyond FOM!

    • Lucas "Mr. Veloce" said on 1st September 2011, 18:07

      Is it? Or are you being sarcastic? I personally think having Bahrain back near at the start of the year is a stupid idea. With the civil unrest, the whole point of having the Grand Prix nearer to the end on the second provisional calendar was to give the Bahraini government more time to calm the civil unrest. They just have gone and made a stupid error in my opinion. I get what you are on about with having Bahrain and China back-to-back, its a bad idea, the whole point of having back-to-back races is that they aren’t far apart from each other. Having Bahrain and China back-to-back is like having a dying person being taken to the furthest hospital when there others nearby.

  4. Alexander said on 31st August 2011, 17:54

    gutted that turkey is dropped, why didn’t they drop Valencia or Bahrain. i know turkey wasn’t a big f1 country but the track was awesome, it was a drivers track
    there is only 8 European races now
    there is now 12 fly away races, there are too many Asian races

  5. Wow, skipping the entirity of August! Gives me a chance to go on holiday, but other than that, i’m disappointed! The main thing is that the first race is where it should be, and the final race is where it should be. There’s nothing better than getting up early for the Australian GP after a winter of anticipation and i’m glad that will be the case this year.

    A shame about Turkey, I like the circuit, but if it isn’t selling then that’s that.

  6. f1geordie said on 31st August 2011, 18:00

    Get Bahrain out and Istanbul back in! Aside the human rights stuff, Bahrain is such a dull race :(

  7. Mr_Kinetic said on 31st August 2011, 18:02

    what about India and Abu Dhabi? wasn’t that another back to back race?

  8. Nullius said on 31st August 2011, 18:03

    I’ll be amazed if this calendar holds up. Bahrain is still full of Saudi troops and many of the circuit’s shia employees have “disappeared”. The fact that is slated to be on the weekend after China also suggests that it is not the firmest of fixtures in the minds of the FIA.

    Also, three weeks between rounds 2 and 3 (and fully a month off between China and Spain if Bahrain is pulled), *and* five weeks off in the summer, but 6 back to back weekends (5 without Bahrain)?!?

    I can see some sponsors getting grumpy about this.

    I await the revised calendar with interest.

  9. jagolevert (@jagolevert) said on 31st August 2011, 18:07

    India and Abu Dhabi are also back to back, according to this.
    I think it’s a real shame that Turkey’s been dropped, obviously if it’s not getting the punters there, it’s not financially possible, but it’s a good circuit, going to miss the fabulous turn 8! I can’t stand Valencia, it’s such a dull track, incredibly little overtaking and it looks the same throughout, very hard to distingusih between the different points of the track. I hope when it’s contract is up, Formula 1 moves on elsewhere, there’s so many other better tracks. I wouldn’t mind going to Germany twice in a year, both the Nurburgring and Hockenheimring are great tracks, but it’d be nice to get somewhere like Magny-Cours or even the A1 Ring back. Anything but Valencia ..!

  10. ed24f1 (@ed24f1) said on 31st August 2011, 18:11

    They should place Turkey on standby for April 22nd in case Bahrain has to be cancelled again.

    Apart from that, I like the calendar. It’s great to have Australia and Brazil as the bookends of the season, and it will be interesting to have a new track for the penultimate race of the year.

    The 5 week break will be tough, though, for the fans!

  11. Keith Collantine (@keithcollantine) said on 31st August 2011, 18:15

    I’m particularly glad to see there’s no clash with the Le Mans 24 Hours (16/17th June).

    • ed24f1 (@ed24f1) said on 31st August 2011, 18:33

      Hopefully a Massa/Alonso/Fisichella Ferrari GT car then!

    • matt90 (@matt90) said on 31st August 2011, 18:42

      That’s a rare treat. Although I quite liked having such a ridiculously motorsport orientated weekend this year- le mans in the background for 24 hours, sometimes with long proper watching periods and breaks for F1 quali and race.

      And I doubt it’ll result in any F1 drivers competing anyway unfortunately, although here’s hoping for a Vettel, Schumacher, Rosberg Audi against a sorted Hamilton, Button, di Resta Aston Martin.

      • BasCB (@bascb) said on 31st August 2011, 18:54

        To be honest, even if Vettel might end up driving some car there, for Rosberg and Schu it will rather be a Mercedes SLS GT car and Button and Hamilton would probably end up in a McLaren MP4-12C GT3.

        • Victor_RO (@victor_ro) said on 31st August 2011, 19:37

          Except for the fact that GT3 cars are not allowed at Le Mans… and before anyone trots out the press release which confirmed the WEC, the GT World Championship GT class and the ACO/WEC GT class will be two separate things.

          And I’m not sure anyone from the F1 grid will be mad enough to do Le Mans as well… though I hope there will be someone. :D Also hoping to see Brundle make the trip again and hopefully finish the race for a change.

          • BasCB (@bascb) said on 31st August 2011, 21:00

            Oh, yeah forgot about that! Bugger that, but they still will never drive an Aston (competitor)

            But we might see Kimi in the Pug!

          • matt90 (@matt90) said on 31st August 2011, 23:51

            But Aston and Audi aren’t real competitors as they are in a different class. But I know what you mean, shame we won’t see anybody released from a contract even if they were interested.

    • Zahir (@zahir) said on 31st August 2011, 19:05

      Yep Martin Brundle has already mentioned on twitter that he hopes to drive there this year thanks to them not clashing. It will be interesting to see who else from the F1 circus will try get a drive at Le Mans next year.

      I hope my exams are over by then because it would be nice to stay up for the 24 hours for the first time.

      Also seeing this calendar has already made me quite excited for next year bearing in mind this seasons titles are all but wrapped up. I got a good feeling for the 2012 season!

  12. Frans said on 31st August 2011, 18:22

    Wow, lots of back to back race… I counted 7! I guess MotoGP 2012 schedule would look this funky too? :)

    It will be a quiet August…

  13. CarsVsChildren (@carsvschildren) said on 31st August 2011, 18:29

    Just one thing I noticed: If Bahrain is cancelled again this year that leaves a month long gap in the calendar…. won’t that really disrupt the flow of the season? Two periods of nothing, followed by months of hectic activity.

    • ed24f1 (@ed24f1) said on 31st August 2011, 18:35

      Yes, but they are planning to have a test between Bahrain and Spain, so there will be at least something to watch in that period.

      I don’t really understand why they have a 3 week gap after Malaysia though, surrounded by two back-to-back races. They could’ve spaced that out a little better.

      • You assume the testing shall be broadcast.

        • Bigbadderboom said on 1st September 2011, 17:33

          I would be more suprised if they didn’t bring testing back, there’s been enough noise from most of the teams this year, I’m sure it’s something FOTA will be addressing.

  14. Ned Flanders (@ned-flanders) said on 31st August 2011, 18:33

    Sad but not at all surprising to see Bahrain back on the calendar. It is about time that F1 got its priorities right and stopped associating itself so closely with such murderous regimes

    • PieLighter (@pielighter) said on 31st August 2011, 21:02

      I wouldn’t be surprised to see a Tripoli GP to be quite honest.

    • Prisoner Monkeys (@prisoner-monkeys) said on 1st September 2011, 4:18

      It is about time that F1 got its priorities right and stopped associating itself so closely with such murderous regimes

      Uh-huh. Define “murderous regime”, please. The government in Manama was willing to order its security forces to open fire on peaceful protests, correct?

      Well, the government in Canberra was attempting to “solve” the problem of illegal immigrants by shipping nearly a thousand of them to Malaysia – a country where asylum seekers have no legal rights and live in constant fear of harrassment, detainment and beatings from security forces. The “Malaysia Solution” was supposed to discourage people-smugglers (exactly how it was supposed to happen is a mystery). The only thing that stopped it from going ahead was a High Court ruling that deemed the plan unconsitutional because the government could not make good on their obligations to protect the asylum seekers. Nevertheless, the government is still trying to send asylum seekers to Malaysia, a place where they will have no rights.

      So, if Formula 1 cannot go to Bahrain, then it cannot come to Australia either.

      • MaroonJack (@maroonjack) said on 1st September 2011, 7:05

        You compare a failed plan to deport asylum seekers with an actual orders to shoot, imprison and torture people. Don’t you think that there’s a huge difference between the two?

        • Prisoner Monkeys (@prisoner-monkeys) said on 1st September 2011, 8:42

          There’s a difference – it’s just not as vast as you think it is. If the “Malaysia Solution” had been approved, the asylum seekers would have been sent to Malaysia within fifteen minutes of the verdict. And once there, the Australian government would not be able to guarantee their safety.

          The point in all of this is that the whole “Formula 1 should only go to countries where it is ethical to do so” argument is absolute rubbish. No-one who points to Bahrain as being a human ricghts black hole criticises China. Nobody complains that China is one of the most oppressive regimes in the world. If you look deeply enough, every country has something they’ve said or done that could be used as an argument against them having a Grand Prix.

          • MaroonJack (@maroonjack) said on 1st September 2011, 9:11

            There’s a difference – it’s just not as vast as you think it is.

            The difference is huge, mainly because it didn’t happen. A stupid idea was born and died, before anyone was hurt.

            The point in all of this is that the whole “Formula 1 should only go to countries where it is ethical to do so” argument is absolute rubbish.

            Agreed, but I don’t think that’s the argument. I think it’s more like: “F1 shouldn’t be used to support bloody regimes”.

            There is a difference between going to a country where crime happens and supporting the guilty party. Going to Bahrain could be seen as the latter: an act of support for Al Khalifa family, King Hamad and Sunnis.

            It’s true that Communist Party of China has blood on it’s hands. Obviously we should stand against it. However Chinese Grand Prix isn’t a direct sign of support for Hu Jintao, for CPC or People’s Liberation Army.

          • Prisoner Monkeys (@prisoner-monkeys) said on 1st September 2011, 9:17

            However Chinese Grand Prix isn’t a direct sign of support for Hu Jintao, for CPC or People’s Liberation Army.
            The Chinese Grand Prix was organised by and receives financial support from Beijing.

          • MaroonJack (@maroonjack) said on 1st September 2011, 9:51

            The Chinese Grand Prix is not a political event. The Bahrain Grand Prix definitely is. I understand why they might seem the same to you, but from my point of view they aren’t. We all have to draw the line somewhere and we draw it differently.

          • Everything in China is a political event. You don’t seriously think thew CPC likes the cars and the noises do you?

          • HoHum (@hohum) said on 1st September 2011, 17:11

            Prisoner Monkey, as an English teacher you should know the difference between an “asylum seeker” and an “economic migrant”. People who are part of a minority may leave their country to escape persecution from their government but further movement to other countries is purely economic migration. Why should economic migrants from a failed state be able to migrate to any country they choose when equally poor people from other countries don’t have this choice. Choosing to deliberately break a countries laws might show initiative but I don’t think it is a desirable trait in immigrants.

      • BasCB (@bascb) said on 1st September 2011, 8:52

        Whereby you have perfectly shown the difference between a country like Bahrain and a country with a working and (largely) independent justice system.

        In the case of Australia the justice system stepped in to stop stupid ideas by politicians happen.
        In Bahrain ppl were convicted in one sided military courts (that is now improving when the cases were moved to a civilian court, even if that court might be biased) on largely constructed cases.
        And we still have to wait and see if the independant investigation into killings of civilians will be really allowed to investigate everything and present its conclusions.

  15. James said on 31st August 2011, 18:51

    Six back-to-back race weekends is going to be hard graft for the teams. It’s alright for the bosses, drivers and riff-raff who generally hop on the plane in the evening. I feel for the mechanics tasked with packing up and getting under way. They’ve also got to be in attendence for four test sessions as well!

    Good luck ladies and gents!

    • Prisoner Monkeys (@prisoner-monkeys) said on 1st September 2011, 4:21

      Four test sessions? There’s only one planned, to take place at Mugello ahead of the European leg of the championship.

      It’s perfectly manageable, by the way – the teams actually have two or three full pit crews and rotate them through the races to give the mechanics a break. The drivers, management and race engineers are the only people within the team who attend every race.

    • BasCB (@bascb) said on 1st September 2011, 8:55

      The total amount of test sessions has not changed. They have one less during the winter pre-season and instead have it before Barcelona.

      And the 5 week summer period makes it a tad easier to find some time off as well.

1 2 3

Add your comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

All comments must abide by the comment policy. Comments may be moderated.
Want to post off-topic? Head to the forum.
See the FAQ for more information.