Schumacher: “I did exactly what I was supposed to do”

2011 Italian Grand Prix

Michael Schumacher, Mercedes, Monza, 2011

Michael Schumacher, Mercedes, Monza, 2011

Michael Schumacher brushed off criticism of his defensive driving against Lewis Hamilton in the Italian Grand Prix.

Schumacher said his driving was within the rules: “I felt I did exactly what I was supposed to do and as far as I understand there was no request for me to see the stewards so I guess everything is in order.”

During the race Hamilton repeatedly complained to his team that Schumacher was making move defensive moves than he was allowed to, saying “He’s moving all over the place” and asking “I thought he was only allowed to move once?” to which the team replied: “Understood, Lewis. The FIA are aware.”

Schumacher was reminded by Ross Brawn to ensure he left room for Hamilton at Ascari, where Hamilton eventually passed the Mercedes.

After the race, asked if Schumacher’s driving had been fair, Hamilton said “Yeah, that’s racing.”

Hamilton added: “It was a good race. I got some points and I finished, so I can’t really complain.”

He also explained how he ended up behind Schumacher following the safety car period: “At the restart Michael was on the outside of me and I was looking at him in my mirrors.

“And then before I knew it the guys had gone so I missed the opportunity to slipstream Sebastian [Vettel].

“I got caught napping but once we finally got pas t I was able to chase down and I had fun chasing Fernando [Alonso].”

He said his car’s straight-line speed made it hard to pass the Mercedes: “We just lost a little bit on the straights and that’s why I couldn’t pass Michael.”

2011 Italian Grand Prix

Browse all 2011 Italian Grand Prix articles

Image ?? Daimler

Advert | Go Ad-free

197 comments on Schumacher: “I did exactly what I was supposed to do”

1 2 3 4
  1. Valentino said on 11th September 2011, 15:56

    I liked his drive today. He made me remember what racing was all about 10 years ago.

  2. David A said on 11th September 2011, 15:59

    I thought he’d be a sitting duck, but he proved that defensive driving is anything but dead. Well done Michael.

    • Pretty easy when the car behind is on the limiter, it was Hamilton that was the sitting duck, Schumacher had the top speed

      • David A said on 11th September 2011, 16:23

        It was kind of inevitable that the works Mercedes would be passed (it’s slower through the corners and Hamilton had DRS), so Lewis and his potentially win-challenging car was anything but a sitting duck.

        • Do you understand what the limiter is? His car was hitting top speed even before DRS was open.

          • Thanks Bertie, this is basic stuff, surprised by some comments, and yes it was before DRS was even open.

          • David-A (@david-a) said on 11th September 2011, 16:45

            Yes, I know what the limiter is. I also said that the Mclaren was the faster through the corners, which meant that Hamilton was able to claw back any disadvantage on the straights and stick near the Merc, which was also having problems with its rear tyres.

            Schumacher was going to get passed at some point, and he defended brilliantly from Hamilton. Button demonstrated how inevitable a pass was.

          • Aussie Fan said on 12th September 2011, 6:45

            but if the car behind comes out of a corner faster (as the Mclaren does) & is in the DRS zone it can still pass the car in front using DRS before it hits the limiter as the reduced drag will make the car accelerate quicker up to the point where it hits the limiter….. i.e the 1st DRS zone (where hamilton eventiually passed), Hamilton wasn’t on the limiter but he had DRS available to use, so it was his poorly timed attempts that allowed MS to defend for so long.

            It works both ways, again, look how long it took JB to get past when he had the chance.. Hamilton just had poor timing on his pass attempts, & wasn’t using the strengths of his car to his advantage best for a while.

        • Doesn’t matter, DRS has little impact if you’ve already topped out / hit the limiter as was clearly shown.

          • David-A (@david-a) said on 11th September 2011, 17:13

            He still had a car that could have got by way before he actually did. Either poor attacking or good defending.

          • F1fanNL (@) said on 11th September 2011, 17:16

            You always gain speed because of the reduction in drag. The DRS is said to be the equivalent of about 100 horsepower. No matter how you set up your ratio’s that’ll always give you a descent boost. 100 hp gain at the same rpm is a lot.
            What hurt Hamilton rather than being in the limiter was that when he moved out of Schumacher’s slip stream his top speed went down by almost 10 kph.

            He needed slipstream AND DRS to achieve the speeds Schumacher was doing.

          • f1fan… sorry, but you need to pay attention in physics class… once you are on the limiter… the engine will not turn any more revs under power… and at the compression ratios they run… i doubt it would “coast” up on any more either… 100 horsepower is a lot at the same rpm… if you have the headroom to use it for rpm increase… duh…

          • Aussie Fan said on 12th September 2011, 6:49

            wrong, it has massive impact on being able to accelerate to that top speed faster in the 1st place, & the only point that the Mclaren was hitting the limiter was on the front straight.

            I remind you that the DRS was available on the back straight too (where the Macca’s WEREN’T hitting the limiter), this is where they both got past the Mercedes in the end, although Button made much less of a fuss about it than Hamilton did.

            Vettel was short geared too, & look at how much more speed he carried off the corners, he simply drove past the Ferrari even though the Ferrari had a higher top speed with its DRS. So by your argument Vettel shouldn’t have been able to get past Alonso so easily, because Hamilton struggled to get past MS?

            FAIL….

          • TED BELL said on 12th September 2011, 7:54

            DRS is another dumb F1 idea.

            Only because how it is allowed to be used. The regulations that determine how and when and where it is to be used need urgent changing.

            The advantage and disadventage of how it works depending on whether you are chasing or being chased is retarded.

            On Fridays most drivers use it like it really ought to be used, whenever and where ever. Race day is a joke based on how DRS is used.

            Close racing penalizes the lead driver and gifts the follower an unfare advantage.

            When the high number of passes per race are mentioned during the race broadcast I think F1 has lost a bit of its glory.

            Allow the driver to decide when it is needed and where it might benefit.

      • Stefanauss (@stefanauss) said on 11th September 2011, 16:24

        Yet you have to rely on your strengths, and MSC perfectly exploited the features of his car.

        And Button overtook MSC on his 1st attempt, so your argument about top speed and limiters is very very weak. There was a lot Lewis could do, he simply did not manage doing it.

        • Not at all, for a start they did not have the same top gear, Button had a higher top speed and he brilliantly mugged Schumacher because of the Hamilton fight, took an excellent opportunity, other wise it could of been the same for Button

          • David-A (@david-a) said on 11th September 2011, 16:48

            Hamilton could have passed sooner if not for good defending. He had advantages at some points (corners, car that was easier on tyres). Schumacher was going to be passed sooner or later by the MP4-26.

          • Stefanauss (@stefanauss) said on 11th September 2011, 17:01

            Hamilton passed Schumacher twice, one for each for DRS zone. How could such thing happen if his car was hitting the limiter?
            Schumacher had the top speed, that’s very clear, but that hardly makes LH a sitting duck. That’s not Montecarlo.

          • “Hamilton could have passed sooner if not for good defending. He had advantages at some points (corners, car that was easier on tyres). Schumacher was going to be passed sooner or later by the MP4-26.”

            Of course, I’m not saying otherwise, but DRS was not its normal advantage, defending was much easier than it would normally be because of the gear ratio problem. Hamilton was faster through the corners (can’t overtake) MSC was much faster 12kph+ down the straights. It made his job defending pretty easy.

          • “Hamilton passed Schumacher twice, one for each for DRS zone. ”

            Yes and MSC took the place back because his higher top speed.
            The second time was mainly due to a MSC mistake.

            Hamilton was hitting the limiter (very early on the straights), fact.

            When you hit top speed, you hit top speed irrespective of extra HP or reduced drag of the DRS, that just effects how quickly you get to top speed.

          • David-A (@david-a) said on 11th September 2011, 21:03

            Trouble is, it definitely looked anything but easy, the Mclaren was the faster car around the track which allowed Hamilton to consistently apply pressure. I stick by the belief that it was very skillful driving for Schu to keep Hamilton behind.

          • HappyFeet (@happyfeet) said on 11th September 2011, 21:15

            Yes, It was pretty clear that he drives brilliantly. If Rosberg put in the situation then it was easier for Ham to do the job.

        • Aussie Fan said on 12th September 2011, 6:51

          Exactly, I agree completly Stefanauss.

      • +1 David A
        Lewis was 0.5-1 sec faster than Schumacher.
        Glad Stewards didn’t “steal” that great battle and defense

        • I’m pleased the stewards didn’t get involved, but if that was Hamilton weaving around in the braking zones do you really think NOTHING would have been done by the stewards?

          Think about it.

          • I agree with you. Although I thought his squeezing Hamilton off the track was pretty bad, I was in two minds about the double defensive move. On one hand I thought he should be punished as other drivers have been (especially Hamilton) for exactly the same thing and the rule has been stressed so many times all the drivers should be abiding by it. However on the other hand I am not sure I even like the double defending rule as it seems to go against the whole point of racing. I just wish there was some consistency so from now on I expect all drivers to be let off with it.

          • I don’t think Schumacher “weaving” around he didn’t do the superb weave like Hamilton did with Petrov last year, i paste Keith comment to here:
            “A defending driver may move off-line once to defend his position and then move back to his original line on the way into a corner, but cannot push a rival on that line off the track

            This is how the rule is enforced and we’ve seen it time and time again in F1 over recent years. You could probably find an example from every race this year of drivers doing it and not being penalised.”
            They didn’t touch and there was no accident, Hamilton didn’t got punished at Spa for the crash with Kobayashi. Fair enough if you want to blame, blame the consistency but in this race i showed great battle with great push to the limit defend from Schumacher.

          • Aussie Fan said on 12th September 2011, 6:54

            I never saw any eaving, more just people getting excited about the myth of the dirty Schumacher tactics… Suppose it is a UK forum so no big surprise, I couldn’t even believe the comments about the defending from DC 7 MB considering all the contact at the start between Vettel & hamilton = Vettel & alonso & then Hamilton & MS didn’t even touch cars, not ONCE.

          • HappyFeet (@happyfeet) said on 12th September 2011, 7:22

            No weaving at all!! Fantastic race to watch by both racer. But the old one teach him a lesson. :)

          • @Aussie Fan

            No one has said he weaved. The argument is that he made two separate defending moves, that does not necessarily mean he weaved (which would be a continuous double move rather than one with a gap in the middle).

            You are obviously allowed to get back on to the racing line, but this is only if you do not impede the overtaking driver.

            So no you would not have seen a weave as there was not one……

            However look for the double move instead.

      • ob1kenobi.23 (@ob1kenobi23) said on 12th September 2011, 4:05

        There were 2 DRS zones. I think he was only on the limiter on the main straight.
        Jenson did his pass in the other DRS zone although I think Ross said that Michael had exhausted his KERS defending against Lewis.
        Since he had the superior package, maybe he should have tried an outside pass like Seb did on Fernando & not try to get up the inside.

  3. Schumacher avoids justice yet again! Has nothing changed since 2006? It seems NOT where Schumacher is concerned!! Why was it that the FIA chose to turn a blind eye to the shifting positions of Schumacher viz-a viz Lewis Hamilton’s passing manoeuvres in that no drive through penalty was given when Lewis had a drive through penalty when he behaved in a similar manner? Disgraceful! Thought F1 had changed since Schumacher retired!! I don’t think so!! Seems that anything/anyone to do with Ferrari can get away with every infringement of the rules!!!

    • Cristian (@cristian) said on 11th September 2011, 16:04

      You are right, he shouldn’t have taken the race line for the turn, correct it would have been for him to drive straight, maintaining his line and out of the track ( and off Hamilton’s way).

    • so, you like boring races?

      • It’s not about boring races but consistency from the stewards. If Micheal can do it then might as well let everyone do it and have a legal and interesting race. Unless you find unfair races entertaining.

        • Do what? Defend within the rule set?

          Surprise surprise mate, they are all allowed to do it.

        • How did he defend within the rules? The rules clearly state that you are only allowed to make one defending move. Schumacher clearly made two and it was therefore illegal. We have seen drivers punished for this quite a few times so it was baffling that Schumacher was let off with it. For the record though I do not like the rule, but it is there it is quite clear. However like all F1s Rules (ahem… cars must not leave the circuit… cough, cough…) it appears that it is randomly enforced.

          • Keith Collantine (@keithcollantine) said on 11th September 2011, 21:30

            he rules clearly state that you are only allowed to make one defending move. Schumacher clearly made two and it was therefore illegal.

            Historically, that is not the interpretation of the rule that has been used. If your interpretation was used there would have been dozens of other examples of drivers being given penalties for breaking the rules when driving defensively over the past few years.

            As I wrote almost exactly three years ago (Four of F1′s ‘unwritten rules’):

            A defending driver may move off-line once to defend his position and then move back to his original line on the way into a corner, but cannot push a rival on that line off the track

            This is how the rule is enforced and we’ve seen it time and time again in F1 over recent years. You could probably find an example from every race this year of drivers doing it and not being penalised.

            Schumacher’s driving was entirely consistent with it, with perhaps the exception that he was squeezing Hamilton a bit too much when returning to his line, hence the messages you heard.

          • If he was squeezing Hamilton too much (which I agree was the case) then surely this is consistent with forcing another driver off the racing line?

            I seem to remember Hamilton being called to the stewards over this rule (I think against kobayashi) and although he was only reprimanded the situation was used to clarify to all drivers that the kind of move Hamilton pulled was not allowed. In that case Kobayashi was clearly behind Hamilton throughout the two moves and the second move was to enable hamilton to get back onto the racing line.

            I must say that I do not like the rule and if it was up to me no driver would be punished for it at all as it has been part of racing for pretty much the history of the sport. Unless the move is dangerous then surely it should be part of racing?

          • He didn’t force him off his line though at any point.

            What he did do was get close to doing it. Into Ascari there was potential for a problem as Hamilton had so much more speed coming out of the second Lesmo. I think that’s why we heard Brawn on the radio.

          • Aussie Fan said on 12th September 2011, 6:56

            please youtube link these 2 moves, I never saw anything of the like, only 1 sttong move & them moving back to take the corner as Lewis wasn’t up alongside him (as he could have done if he hadn’t attacked towards the inside & then been blocked by a legitimate defensicve move.

        • What about Alonso putting vettel on the grass at the early on?

          • snowman said on 12th September 2011, 14:48

            Four unwritten Rules really good article Keith.
            Especially the last line! haha!

            Unfortunately FOM have messed up the YouTube videos in the 3 years since wrote! Irritates me why they do this!

            For example Schumi on-board start at SPA is absolute classic that wasn’t shown on the main TV feed, and FOM have taken down every video of it put on YouTube and in their own official race edit don’t show any of it. Not a great way to promote the sport!

    • Yes, the reason Schumacher wasn’t punished was nothing to do with the fact he didn’t break any rules – it’s all because he used to drive for Ferrari. Good one.

    • AndresM (@andresm) said on 11th September 2011, 16:09

      Ferrari???? I thought Michael was driving for Mercedes.

      Michael has played dirty as he always does. At least with some poetic justice Lewis has swalled a bit of his own medicine.

    • marcblondino said on 11th September 2011, 16:32

      oh come on! This is not Hamilton from 2007/08. He started to complain just like A. Prost, it’s never his fault: it’s car or mechanic or rules or Fia or Schumacher or stewards. Come on Lewis it’s time to accept the challenge. It’s finaly real racing what we were used when Senna was around. My opinion is that Lewis is the bigest potencial but he should focus his energy on solving problems not to make them.

      • Hehe, every driver complains to their team when they are inside the car. It doesn’t matter what their general temperament is, they all do it. I imagine it’s a good way for them to vent frustration.

        What else would you expect, given you’re dealing with a bunch of highly competitive athletes, driving around on the limit at 200mph? :P

      • It was a very wild move. You should not dive down on the apex like that.

        What happened in the last race?/

        Maldonado did the same thing, but in qualifying. Look at it this way, if Lewis had to get off the throttle so much that he lost a position to Jenson, then michael moved way too much.

        • panache said on 11th September 2011, 22:50

          I found this comment amusing as I thought you were refering to Hamilton until the very end.

          It was Hamilton who made a “dive down on the apex” trying to drive into a gap that was always going to disappear.

          • I think the point is that the gap should not disappear completely if the cars are effectively alongside. For one thing if they had hit then it was likely both would have been out of the race. However it is entirely possible Schumacher simply could not see Hamilton in those pointless mirrors they have (surely it is time the FIA made these bigger?).

          • Maksutov said on 12th September 2011, 5:33

            @Lee

            cars are effectively alongside

            But they were not effectively alongside.

    • So pathetic. What has Ferrari do with that fight? Let me see, they talked to Ross Brawn and asked him to ask Michael to do anything to slow down the McLarens, because they had already arranged everything with the stewards.

    • A few years ago I would have agreed with you, but thankfully those days are gone now that drivers are advising the stewards rather than ex Ferrari publicist (that knew nothing about racing). I would say the stewards still have some improvements to make (or perhaps the F1 Rules need restructuring to make them easier to implement) however I do not think the Stewards are pro-ferrari any longer.

    • zappy j said on 12th September 2011, 1:55

      Exactly. Should have let Ramilton through. Surprised he didnt ram poor Schumi off the track.

  4. Schumacher stuck to make a move to defend and then another back to the racing line for the corner. Not sure why he needs to defend that, or why Brundle and DC thought it was wrong, but so it goes.

    People hail Aryton Senna for similar racing, yet criticize Schumacher for doing the same. Odd, eh?

    • Probably because Hamilton got a rap on the knuckles for exactly the same thing, defending and then taking the racing line, China? or Malaysia?

      • Julian said on 12th September 2011, 1:43

        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5vkushrj-F4
        http://vimeo.com/22298795
        Cant find any decent footage of schuey yet, but words will do.

        So they were approaching Lesmo 1, schuey moved to the right to prevent Hamilton going up the inside, then moved back to the left and took the racing line into the corner.

        In those two videos, Hamilton makes a move to his left, then his right, then his left, then to the right then onto the racing line. Its not as extreme in the 2nd vid, but he still does it..

        So yeah, same thing??
        LOL

    • rick2k9 (@rick2k9) said on 11th September 2011, 16:30

      the difference here is that in the 80′s and 90′s it was legal to make several moves to defend, and today it isn’t. To be fair though, I think I only saw one instance where Michael clearly made 2 moves to maintain his position.
      It was a fun battle to watch, but Jenson was able to get past both so easily. Makes me think that Lewis made an error in his setup for the race. Lewis had good pace at the end on low fuel, but at the start the balance seemed upset.

      • yes Hamilton did make an error on setup ^^ they expected to be running at the front (by getting pole), he wouldn’t of had problems against Vettel on the straights if he could of got close enough, but no way was fighting the Mercs even a consideration

        • Nigelstash (@nigelstash) said on 11th September 2011, 16:46

          Interesting this. This season McLaren just don’t seem to be able to get it right – think Barcelona – but today I think they did, it was Lewis’ sleepiness after the safety car that cost him a podium. In fact, he could have challenged for a win if he’d managed to rattle Vettel early on. Vettel isn’t making mistakes and nor are Red Bull.

  5. Cristian (@cristian) said on 11th September 2011, 16:02

    Great drive from Michael Schumacher.

  6. It was a good battle – hard but fair, the kind of thing most of us actually want to see. Good to see that Hamilton, once he was out of the heat of the moment, obviously reflected on the incident and concluded it was all above board too. He’s sometimes quite good at playing the victim but evidently not this time.

    • David BR said on 11th September 2011, 16:12

      Or with the Kobayashi collision. Or quite a few others where I can recall Hamilton taking the blame.

    • He’s maturing as a racer and I’m starting to really respect and like him because of it.

      • macca77 said on 11th September 2011, 17:32

        Funny that I used to respect Lewis, but now, with 4 or more years in F1, and making more mistakes that in 2007 and being surpassed by his ‘not top tier’ teammate, he is becoming one of the big jokes of F1.

    • I do think Hamilton can be forgiven for complaining when he was in the car. Must have been mightily frustrating to be stuck there and feel nothing works to get past.

      And he was the one that got a bit of a dodgy penalty for changing his line a earlier in the year, something that was not that much different a situation from what Schu did here, I think.

      But NO, Schu did not deserve any penalty and its good to see Hamilton can agree on that as well now.

  7. It was a great drive I think, I have to agree with Valentino, Schumacher today reminded me of how excited I used to get in the 90s when watching great hard but fair battles on track :D

    I also don’t think Schumacher was blocking in an unfair matter, you’re allowed to move once which is what he did, and you are also allowed to move back to take back to the racing line before a corner, which is why I believe he wasn’t moving more than once, he moved to defend and then he moved back to the racing line before the corner, which is quite hard but entirely fair I believe. Only once did I think Michael was a bit harsh when he put Hamilton on the grass at Curva Grande, but it was exciting racing to watch!

    Without this battle I really don’t think the race was that exciting, so great driving from both Schumacher and Hamilton!!

    • Ragerod said on 11th September 2011, 17:48

      These battles are dying breed thanks to DRS. It was reminiscent of the great battles of the 90s.

      I agree that it was all fair except when he forced Hamilton onto the grass but I’ll put that down as an unintentional block.

    • Maksutov said on 12th September 2011, 5:48

      Michael was a bit harsh when he put Hamilton on the grass

      yeah that one I agree with, but somehow i think it is more likely that Schu was caught out and didn’t expect Hamilton to go for that line.

      I don’t believe Schumacher would intentionally put Hamilton off onto the grass but certainly he would indeed make every opportunity as tight as possible.

      I think Hamilton drove very well and respect to him because he didnt take anyone out and did not collide with Schumacher. So respect to both.

      Regarding Button i think Button got lucky to pass both of them.

  8. Schueyfan said on 11th September 2011, 16:12

    Great wheel to wheel racing between Michael and Lewis. I was disappointed with Lewis’ inability to overtake Michael. The problem was not his racecraft, but the fact that he has been hauled in front of the stewards so many times this year he has been handcuffed. He is now afraid to hang out a move in order to make his pass stick. Michael and Lewis are IMO similar racers and I love to watch them both. Jenson doesn’t have the same record with the stewards and felt free to make his pass stick.

    Love the fact the Merc F1 was so fast around Monza. If Merc can continue imporoving the F1 car 2012 could be a great season for Michael. I really hope so. I think Michael has learnt to drive ‘just within’ the regs … finally!

    • rick2k9 (@rick2k9) said on 11th September 2011, 16:37

      I don’t think it came down to Lewis being afraid of getting a penalty and Jenson thinking he could get away with contact. At that stage of the race Lewis didn’t seem to have the pace out of the corners that the extra downforce was supposed to give him. I think Jenson had a better setup (maybe a little less wing, just enough to make the passes possible on Michael). Everyone talked about the Vulnerability of the Redbull down the straight where I think it really was Lewis that’s had that problem in the last 2 races.

      • Schueyfan said on 11th September 2011, 17:05

        True, the straight line speed of the Merc was awesome. Even when Lewis managed to overtake Michael, he (Michael) immediately re-took the position using the DRS and KERS. I still felt that Lewis was being more cautious than usual though.

        Not only in his driving, I felt Lewis’ after-race interview was stilted too. It’s a shame when drivers can’t actually give their true opinions, but have to resort to ‘corporate speak’. I guess Lewis is just too tired of being hauled over the coals for his driving style and after race comments.

        • Maksutov said on 12th September 2011, 5:59

          I still felt that Lewis was being more cautious than usual though.

          I agree with that. But I think Hamilton did the right thing to avoid any potential collisions and respect for Hamilton this time because he did not collide with his opponent (yes i repeated myself there). Hamilton has to expect that other drivers (whether it be Kobayashi or MSC or Maldonado or whoever) are not going to make everything so easy. Meaning, to make sure one doesn’t crash out he himself needs to be cautious.

          • Hamilton has to expect that other drivers (whether it be Kobayashi or MSC or Maldonado or whoever) are not going to make everything so easy. Meaning, to make sure one doesn’t crash out he himself needs to be cautious.

            +1 :)

          • Asanator (@asanator) said on 12th September 2011, 16:50

            I agree with that too, I don’t think it was anything to do with the stewards, I think it was just that Hamilton was desperate to finish the race. Having to finish was pretty much all he talked about pre-race and I don’t think he wanted to ‘risk’ it with Schuey who drove awesomely!

    • Schueyfan, I agree 100% with this. All these meetings with stewards has dumbed down the driver that was Hamilton.

      Well, at least we have DRS. We don’t need overtakers like Schumi or Hamilton in F1 anymore.

      • Maksutov said on 12th September 2011, 6:13

        All these meetings with stewards has dumbed down the driver that was Hamilton.

        I am not sure about that one… I dont think this is going to stop a driver like Hamilton to drive the way they do, other than the very question of “finishing” or “not finishing” the race. I think Hamilton might be starting to realize that potential contact with your opponent equals high chance of crashing out. On the end of the day, you lose more when you crash.

  9. Jonathan said on 11th September 2011, 16:13

    Great racing. It was a unique situation in which the straight-line speed of the Mercedes negated the effect of Hamilton’s DRS — it gave us a taste of the sort of racing we might have seen all year if DRS hadn’t made passing trivial at most circuits.

    Was Schumacher’s defensive driving illegal? I don’t think so — it was brilliant.

  10. batador said on 11th September 2011, 16:14

    i’m a hamilton fan, and i think that that battle was the only interesting thing in the whole race. This shows that a lot modern f1 drivers can’t race and that’s why they changed the rules. Here, you had two expert racers, racing all-out and yet, no one crashed…I wish f1 was more like this

    • Schueyfan said on 11th September 2011, 17:07

      Totally agree!

    • 100% agree

    • Jake (@jleigh) said on 11th September 2011, 23:58

      yes…isn’t it odd that we have what everyone calls the most “aggressive” drivers in F1, yet it was seemingly the only battle this season lasting longer than a few laps that didn’t end in tears. My opinion: yes, they are aggressive, but also 2 of the fairest drivers in F1, just look at Monaco.

      These new kids like Maldonado seem to think they shouldn’t give anyone any space at all, and if someone tries to overtake them, if nothing else works, they’ll stop them by turning in on them. Oh and yes, i am picking on Maldonado because imo he shouldn’t be on the grid.

    • I was constantly expecting an accident, very entertaining.

  11. Atticus said on 11th September 2011, 16:14

    Yeah, I agree with the majority here. It was borderline, but fair.

    In fact I like those drivers the most who are constantly take fair advantage of 100% of their possibilities regardless of the absolute speed of their package, always looking for the borders, being so tantalisingly close to it.

    Schumacher got the best out of himself and his package again – and that’s why I liked him in the past, because back then he has been able to do exactly that for seasons, not just for two or three races a year.

    Glad to see him back to form, anyway.

  12. yes..yes…yes.. the old man still got it

  13. One of the most riveting passages this year, for me. Real overtaking threats every single lap, all held off – the perfect balance.

    As for fairness – the majority of times, Schumacher made one move (allowed), and then got back on the racing line for the corner.

    I completely disagree with the BBC commentators who said that (i) Schumacher kept his place by playing dirty, and (ii) Hamilton got past because Schumacher yielded. To my eyes,

    (i) Schumacher stayed ahead for so long because Hamilton didn’t show enough restraint. He tried to overtake on every corner and so he never built up a significant speed advantage. (ii) When he did overtake, it’s because he held back through Lesmo I, made up the gap through Lesmo II, and then had the speed to overtake on the straight – well before Schumacher could even think of moving back to take the corner.

    Of course, that kind of smart driving is exactly what Jenson did after just a lap or two. But that’s why Jenson gets more overtakes, and Hamilton gets more wheel-to-wheel racing.

    • rick2k9 (@rick2k9) said on 11th September 2011, 16:41

      Lewis kept hitting the limiter when he was behind Michael. If he got off the corner well and got past him right away, Michael would just come back later in the straight and pass him back… and when he didn’t get off the corner well, he’d match Michael’s top speed and stay behind him through the length of the straight. I will agree that Michael Yielded, and that led to the pass, but with the setup they had and with the pace they each had at that point in the race, I don’t Lewis could have gained the position had Michael not yielded.

      • bananarama said on 11th September 2011, 17:12

        Lewis’ setup is not Michaels fault though. The first 27 laps were one of the most entertaining bits of the season so far to me. Always liked Michaels driving and its unique today so thats even better. And it shows when he has a top position in sight he can still perform.

      • I think there might have been a difference in gear setup between Hamilton and Button. And Schu’s tyres might have been in worse state, while Buttons were in better state compared to Hamilton.

        But fact remains, Button shaped Schu up nicely to take him at the next possible opportunity, while Hamilton was always just a bit too far to really make it stick.

    • Jonathan said on 11th September 2011, 18:21

      According to Ross Brawn, Schumacher made an error, failing to change up to 6th gear at the right moment and leaving the car in 5th until it was bouncing off the rev limiter. That was what allowed Hamilton to get past.

      • Proesterchen said on 11th September 2011, 20:09

        Yep, MSC admitted as much in at least one of the post-race interviews. Apparantly, he was disctracted while talking to the team and missed the upshift.

    • Maksutov said on 12th September 2011, 6:31

      I completely disagree with the BBC commentators

      I agree with you about that. Yet again, Coulthard and Brundle showed once again to be the two biased losers that they are (their records speak for themselves) with their constant poking on the very subject of fairness. It just seems as whenever they observe anything small they are ready to burst out at Schumacher. Ok fine to a point. But they just kept going on and on and on…

      Anyway, Coulthard should remember the share of unfair moves he himself did when he was racing. Regarding Brundle – i dont think he was even able to drive unfair even if he wanted to, that is how hopeless he was. But I generally respect Bundle comments, but he is starting to show inconsistencies with his opinions.

      • Your second paragraph makes no sense. How can he be so bad that he can’t drive unfairly. That’s stupid. Are you saying he was worse than PK Jnr? Because he managed to drive unfairly.

        For your information Brundle managed to outrace MS in some races when they were team mates.

        And I don’t think Brundle was showing bias at all. To me it seems like he is actually uncomfortable with Coulthard’s bias, and just doesn’t challenge it too much for fear of outing Coulthard on International TV.

        • MaksutovCG said on 13th September 2011, 15:00

          Your second paragraph makes no sense. How can he be so bad that he can’t drive unfairly. That’s stupid. Are you saying he was worse than PK Jnr? Because he managed to drive unfairly.

          i was being sarcastic. don’t worry … you are looking too much into it..

          To me it seems like he is actually uncomfortable with Coulthard’s bias

          fair enough, to me they were both very much agreeing with each other. almost to the point of where i thought they were going to have an orgasm about it…

        • Maksutov said on 13th September 2011, 15:23

          Your second paragraph makes no sense. How can he be so bad that he can’t drive unfairly. That’s stupid. Are you saying he was worse than PK Jnr? Because he managed to drive unfairly.

          I was being sarcastic. But make whatever sense of it you want. as i said, i like Brundle but but he is starting to show inconsistencies with his comments and opinions, and no i don’t think he was anything special during his racing carrier.

          To me it seems like he is actually uncomfortable with Coulthard’s bias, and just doesn’t challenge it too much for fear of outing Coulthard on International TV.

          to me it seems they couldn’t agree with each other more..

      • redlight said on 12th September 2011, 13:01

        Coulthard has always been cautious to avoid bias and often talks and writes of Schumi with the highest regard. Yesterday he clearly stated that what he was saying was his honest held opinion and not the product of any bias.

        You seem to be unwilling to take people at their word and extremely selective in your hearing.

        • Maksutov said on 13th September 2011, 15:15

          Coulthard has always been cautious to avoid bias and often talks and writes of Schumi with the highest regard.

          In recent times perhaps Yes, but taking their past into consideration tells a completely different story. It is going to be hard to convince me that DC respects MSC. I think its a bit of ** tbh. Maybe I have overreacted with that comment but certainly not as much as they overreacted during commentating..

      • To make it clear, I don’t think the BBC commentators are significantly biased. I just don’t agree with them.

  14. Yup he’s back.

  15. “(i) Schumacher stayed ahead for so long because Hamilton didn’t show enough restraint. He tried to overtake on every corner and so he never built up a significant speed advantage. (ii) When he did overtake, it’s because he held back through Lesmo I, made up the gap through Lesmo II, and then had the speed to overtake on the straight – well before Schumacher could even think of moving back to take the corner.”

    Wrong and wrong.

    Seriously did you not see Hamilton bouncing of the limiter and having to duck back in behind for the tow. He just didn’t have the top speed, wrong gear ratios. AS Brawn admitted he only got past because Michael missed a gear shift while talking on the radio, nothing to do with Hamilton holding back in Lesmo I and making the gap in Lesmo II.

1 2 3 4

Add your comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

All comments must abide by the comment policy. Comments may be moderated.
Want to post off-topic? Head to the forum.
See the FAQ for more information.