DRS: How should it work in 2012?

Debates and polls

Michael Schumacher, Mercedes, Nurburgring, 2011

Schumacher using DRS at the Nurburgring

A year since its introduction in F1, the Drag Reduction System continues to inspire a mix of vehement criticism and steadfast defence from F1 fans.

Its detractors say DRS is fundamentally unfair because it robs the leading driver of the ability to defend their position. They add that Pirelli’s more challenging tyres and the reintroduction of KERS in 2011 proved overtaking can be made easier in F1 without resorting to artificial gimmicks.

DRS defenders insist that it has successfully increased overtaking, and that problems with its implementation can be solved by tweaking the rules and positioning of DRS zones.

The top ten passes nominated by F1 Fanatics last year did not contain any that were achieved using DRS. The move that was voted pass of the year – Mark Webber’s sensational move on Fernando Alonso at Eau Rouge in Spa – was reversed the following lap when Alonso used DRS to pass Webber on the straight.

The DRS debate is complex and highly-charged with shades of opinion which run the gamut from banning DRS entirely to subtly changing the rules.

With that in mind, I’ve set up two polls below in an effort to accurately reflect what F1 fans think of this controversial recent addition to the sport after the first full season with it.

How often should DRS be used in 2012?

There are no changes to the DRS rules for 2012, although the position of the DRS zones at some tracks may be altered.

Assuming the DRS rules for 2012 remain unchanged, how often would you like to see DRS available for drivers to use in races?

How often should DRS be used in 2012?

  • DRS should be available in all races throughout 2012 (45%)
  • DRS should be available in most but not all races (20%)
  • DRS should be available in around half of races (7%)
  • DRS should be available in less than half of races (4%)
  • DRS should not be allowed in any races in 2012 (24%)

Total Voters: 604

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How should DRS work in 2012?

In the many conversations we had about DRS during the course of 2011, various different rules were suggested. Here are a selection of some of the most popular alternatives.

But could the alternatives make it less useful for overtaking? Or might they encourage drivers to mainly use DRS on out- and in-laps to increase their chances of passing their rivals via the pits?

Cast your vote on what should be done with the DRS rules in 2012.

How should the DRS rules work in 2012?

  • Drivers can only use DRS when within a second of another car (in races)* (21%)
  • Drivers should have free use of DRS during the races (14%)
  • Drivers should have the opportunity to use DRS a certain number of times per lap (8%)
  • Drivers should have the opportunity to use DRS a certain number of times per race (35%)
  • DRS should stay, but using another different set of rules (6%)
  • DRS should not be allowed at all in 2012 (16%)

Total Voters: 573

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*i.e., the 2011 rules

How successful was DRS in 2011? Do you think it should be used at every track in 2012? And could rules changes improve it?

Cast your votes on DRS using the polls above and have your say in the comments.

An F1 Fanatic account is required in order to vote. If you do not have one, register an account here or read more about registering here.

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170 comments on DRS: How should it work in 2012?

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  1. One suitable solution is to allow the following or the second driver to use the DRS when he is within 1 sec and 2 sec of the leading driver or 0.5 sec to 1.5 sec instead of the current “within 1 sec “.
    This rule not only reduces the gap between cars but also engages them in a wheel-wheel battle to overtake each other.

    See for more details.

  2. tilsken (@tilsken) said on 10th March 2012, 16:29

    how would it be if a driver would only be able to use DRS when within a one second for a certain amount of laps in a row…that would encourage the driver behind to try to overtake, to save time…but if it doesnt work you would get some help from DRS…just a thought…

  3. montreal95 (@montreal95) said on 13th March 2012, 20:31

    The placing of the zone is the crucial thing IMO. At Spa for example, placing of the DRS zone before Les Combes was nonsensical. However if you’d put it on the short Pouhon-Rivages straight, or before Bus Stop it suddenly makes sense.

  4. Jake (@jleigh) said on 14th March 2012, 15:50

    NOT LIKE IT IS!!!

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