Caterham needed a “supported” driver, says Trulli

F1 Fanatic round-up

Jarno Trulli, Caterham, Jerez, 2012

Jarno Trulli, Caterham, Jerez, 2012

In the round-up: Trulli says Caterham picked Petrov for money, while Petrov denies he is a ‘pay driver’.

Links

Trulli not surprised by Caterham exit (Autosport)

“I was prepared for a possible divorce from Caterham, in the knowledge that the difficult economic situation would have pushed the team to find an adequately-supported driver.”

Interview: Petrov on Caterham, 2012 and why pay driver tag is undeserved (James Allen)

“In 2010, I was in need really to show people I came here not for just pay [reasons]. But I showed a few good races in 2010, but it looked like it was not enough for them. But then I think in 2011 they are not allowed to talk any more about this because the pay driver cannot achieve their first podium and then to finish so many times on the points. I think this is not right to talk about [these] things. Also [to] be quicker than Nick [Heidfeld] and be quicker than Bruno [Senna] and other drivers. So I think we need to forget about [suggestions that] we came just for pay.”

F1 Fanatic via Twitter

Domenicali: “I am very sad that, after so many years there will not be an Italian driver in the Formula 1 World Championship field.”

We’ll race Karthikeyan entire season: HRT (The Times of India)

Luis Perez-Sala: “The idea as of now is to race him the whole season, but nothing is taken for granted in F1, you have to work for your place in every race. But as things stand, Narain and Pedro will race the entire season.”

Analysis – Ferrari’s radical F2012 (F1)

“The F2012′s nose is actually higher than that of its predecessor, the 150??? Italia, even with the much-talked-about step.”

Heikki Kovalainen via Twitter

“Welcome to the team Petrov, look forward to work with him. I want to thank Jarno, we became good friends during these years, I wish him well.”

Rubens Barrichello via Twitter

“Sad to see that Trulli won’t be on the 2012 grid… money is dominating everything.”

HRT via Twitter

“We’d like to clarify that we’re in the process of passing the pending crash tests and won’t know until next week if we’ve passed them all.”

Vettel is a modern-day Fangio, says Moss (Reuters)

“Vettel is a modern [Juan Manuel] Fangio, really, in Formula One. I can’t see, other than his natural ability, how he is that good, how he can be that good. I think Vettel is quite outstanding, but then he has got the best car, which is fair enough because normally the best driver gets the best car.”

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Comment of the day

Dan Thorn’s thoughts on Jarno Trulli’s departure from F1:

I know this is entirely the correct move, but as a Trulli fan, and as a Formula 1 fan, this is a sad day for me.

The first F1 season I watched in full was 1997. After his Monaco win the year before Panis was already my favourite driver, but in 1997 I took a shine to two young drivers: Fisichella and Trulli.

Now Panis has been gone for some years, Fisichella bowed out gloriously in 2009 and, now that Trulli?s gone, none of my original ??favourite drivers? are in the sport any more. It?s a personal end of an era for me, and I?m very sad now.

Trulli was one of the good guys. Always friendly on the grid, always with a big smile on his face and he was one of the guys you always felt happy for when he got a podium. His qualifying performances were at times mesmerising, and I think the ‘Trulli train’ was a combination of his Saturday performances and another underrated talent he had ?ǣ defensive driving.

All the best to Petrov though, he deserves a seat and I hope he does well.
Dan Thorn

From the forum

Happy birthday!

Happy birthday to _Ben_ and Mike!

If you want a birthday shout-out tell us when yours is by emailling me, using Twitter or adding to the list here.

On this day in F1

Felipe Massa’s first season of F1 for Sauber got off to an unfortunate start on this day ten years ago.

Sauber were forced to abandon their test at Mugello after Massa crashed heavily in his C21. Team mate Nick Heidfeld had damaged the team’s other car in an accident the previous day.

Image ?? Caterham

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81 comments on Caterham needed a “supported” driver, says Trulli

  1. GeeMac (@geemac) said on 18th February 2012, 9:06

    The one thing we know for sure now is that no one will be complaining about the Caterham’s power steering…

  2. Girts (@girts) said on 18th February 2012, 9:56

    A very happy birthday to you, @Mike !

  3. Fixy (@fixy) said on 18th February 2012, 9:57

    Remember Vitaly, if your power steering works it’s Jarno’s merit!

  4. Icthyes (@icthyes) said on 18th February 2012, 10:27

    Thank goodness Trulli is gone, along with Barrichello. Of the 24 drivers able to compete in F1, looking down the entry list for this year I think pretty much everyone who should be in F1 is there, apart from Robert Wickens, Adrian Sutil and Jaime Alguersuari. And everyone there is probably the best 24 available, excepting the HRT drivers who aren’t exactly occupying valuable real estate. The people I’m not too bothered about on a personal level about having (such as Glock) at least deserve to be there on skill.

    To jump off the COTD, I remember Hill retiring. It was a closing chapter, but it was time it happened and arguably left too long to happen, just like Trulli and Barrichello stayed on too long instead of finishing on a relative high. The driver field of F1 is richer for their departures and despite being a fan of neither I’ll be a lot more interested to see what Senna and Petrov can now do, surely do-or-die chances for them to prove themselves once and for all, than two of the old guard hanging around for sentimental reasons.

  5. UKFan (@) said on 18th February 2012, 11:04

    People just admit it Petrov is a paid driver despite that it doesnt change the fact that he is a decent driver. Decent driver that was beat by another decent driver in Bruno Senna Lalli…also a paid driver.

  6. Jarno Trulli has a particular driving style where he really throws the car into the corners. Some of his onboard race starts in 2008 show him being really aggressive behind the wheel. He didn’t complain about power steering in his Renault and Toyota days, but Caterham are a considerably smaller team. They might not have the resources for a quick fix to power steering, which made it particularly difficult for Trulli.

    Sad to see no Italians on the grid but happy to see Petrov still on the grid, I like that guy.

  7. Fer no.65 (@fer-no65) said on 18th February 2012, 13:35

    Luis Perez-Sala: “The idea as of now is to race him the whole season, but nothing is taken for granted in F1, you have to work for your place in every race. But as things stand, Narain and Pedro will race the entire season.”

    What does that mean? Let me explain the obvious…

    “They’ll race the whole season unless they don’t race the whole season”

    For a team that dropped the exact same guy midway through last season, there’s very little to belive from Perez-Sala statements.

  8. @Dan-Thorn

    You know, I completely understand what you mean, and I feel for you. I started watching in 97 as well, Always liked Trulli, used to play him in the Minardi on my N64.

    I think he will be missed greatly. It sounds like he will keep racing, but he was a big part of F1, so, it will never be the same.

  9. The Limit said on 18th February 2012, 15:35

    I love the way race car drivers go one about ‘pay drivers’ as if they are a modern craze, they have been around in motorsports for years and always will be. The reasons are obvious for small race teams trying to exist in an expensive and highly competitive sport. However, Jarno Trulli neglects one fact about ‘why’ Caterham have decided to drop him. The fact that Heikki Kovalainen thrashed him in 2011 and the fact that he is old, with only one grands prix victory to his name after fifteen years.
    Is it any wonder why a team like Caterham came to this decision? This is not the same as Williams parting company with Rubens Barrichello. Barrichello was a proven grands prix winner who won ‘multiple’ times driving for different teams, Barrichello had style and produced some of the best performances a driver has in F1 in recent decades. This cannot be said of Jarno Trulli, a man who made his career as a perminant roadblock which seven years ago was nicknamed the ‘Trulli Train’ by drivers and fans alike. So slow was the Italian during grandsprix it was not unusual to see half a dozen cars jammed behind his Toyota, and on a regular basis.
    Then there are the complaints. Its not difficult to assume how aggrivated Caterham became during 2011 as Trulli constantly complained about the car’s power steering. A scenario that never seemed to affect Heikki’s performances, a driver with a decade’s less experience than Trulli.

  10. Eastman (@eastman) said on 18th February 2012, 16:16

    Great COTD and I too will miss Trulli as one of my original favorite drivers.

  11. Bobdredds (@bobdredds) said on 19th February 2012, 1:02

    Picture the Catheram boardroom. Mike Gascoyne has been just confirmed in his new post and he’s pulled aside and told, “Mike we have a little job for you.” “You know your friend Jarno…………

  12. Dave Blanc said on 19th February 2012, 10:17

    Utter tripe from Moss again. When you’ve won a world championship i’ll listen to your views.

  13. AndrewTanner (@andrewtanner) said on 19th February 2012, 21:03

    I do think Petrov has surpassed the pay driver status and I think that’s one of the biggest compliments you can probably get in F1!

    He just happens to bring money, which is no surprise, coming from one of the worlds biggest powers desperate to punch a hole into the Western world.

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