Liuzzi: “Of course I miss Formula One”

F1 Fanatic round-up

Vitantontio Liuzzi, HRT, Abu Dhabi, 2011In the round-up: Former HRT driver Vitantonio Liuzzi says he would like to return to the “pinnacle” of motor racing.

Links

Top F1 links from the past 24 hours:

Liuzzi does not rule out Formula One comeback (Touring Car Times)

“Of course I miss Formula One. Because it is the pinnacle of the sport and the ultimate goal in a racing driver’s career. For sure I would like to try to get back there in the future.”

On the Button (The Sun)

Damon Hill: “It is something that comes to you after a number of years in F1. All the things you have learned finally come together and that is what we are seeing with Jenson.”

Damon Hill ‘conflicted’ about Bahrain GP (BBC Radio 4)

Middle East correspondent Kevin Connolly: “The authorities are desperate for Formula 1.”

Question marks still remain on the Bahrain Grand Prix (The National)

“The president of Bahrain’s automobile federation, Sheikh Abdullah bin Isa Al Khalifa, said he expected protests at the event and is ‘happy’ for people to do so as long as they remain peaceful and orderly.”

Bahrain Activist?s Hunger Strike Belies Image of Calm Ahead of Formula One Race (The New York Times)

“Protesters in Bahrain dressed like race-car drivers and held toy guns to convey the message: ‘Formula One Kills.'”

The Unforgettable Jim Clark (Peter Windsor)

A long read on Jim Clark that is definitely worth a few minutes of your time.

The future of Formula 1 electronics (Autosport – subscription required)

“After five years of off-the-shelf electronic systems, over the next 12 months F1’s engine companies face two completely different races against time: one to interface their V8s with the new ECUs; the other to fully integrate the black box’s myriad systems into their ‘green’ machines.”

Life At The Back Of The Pack (F1 Podcast)

“Another factor is where exactly are the lapped drivers supposed to go? If they stray off the racing line, their tyres will collect marbles, which will therefore affect their own personal race. If they remain on the racing line, forcing the lapping cars to stray off the line, then they also will collect marbles and have their race affected. It’s a vicious circle that the blue flags can’t always solve.”

Comment of the day

We had several great Caption Competition entries this week from Willinot, Bendanarama, WebberCANwin94 and Prisoner Monkeys.

But here’s the winner from Tom L:

Sebastian Vettel, Michael Schumacher, Melbourne, 2012

“Tenner on Alonso leading after Malaysia?”
“Oh come on, don?t be ridiculous!”

From the forum

Happy birthday!

Happy birthday to Craig Woollard!

If you want a birthday shout-out tell us when yours is by emailling me, using Twitter or adding to the list here.

On this day in F1

Fernando Alonso scored his first F1 victory with McLaren five years ago today.

Team mate Lewis Hamilton, in his second Grand Prix start, made it a one-two for the silver teams after a race-long battle with the Ferrari drivers.

Kimi Raikkonen completed the podium after team mate Felipe Massa went off trying to pass Hamilton.

Advert | Go Ad-free

55 comments on Liuzzi: “Of course I miss Formula One”

  1. Kevin Campos (@kcampos12) said on 8th April 2012, 0:16

    I don’t completely understand this whole Bahrain conflict. I understand violence and protest is going on there but why does Formula One have to be involved? After all, Its just a sport.

    • de le rose said on 8th April 2012, 0:24

      Agreed – it should be about the track rather than the country, formula 1 should not even think about considering countries’ state of affairs

      • Mike (@mike) said on 8th April 2012, 2:47

        There is no political zero in this. If F1 goes it shows support for the ruling elite.
        And if not it shows support for the protesters.

        Don’t forget it’s money being paid for the race that makes it so important for F1 bigwigs to go.

        • Prisoner Monkeys (@prisoner-monkeys) said on 8th April 2012, 3:02

          @mike

          There is no political zero in this. If F1 goes it shows support for the ruling elite.
          And if not it shows support for the protesters.

          Yes, there is a political zero here. All the sport has to do is say “We are cencelling the race because we are concerned for the safety of teams, the media and spectators” – and then stick to it when one side in Bahrain claims a victory in the sport’s actions (ie, if the protestors applaud themselves for getting the race cancelled, the sport simply has to maintain that it felt the country was unsafe). It’s a neutral way of backing out because it doesn’t take either side.

          • Mike (@mike) said on 8th April 2012, 3:11

            @prisoner-monkeys

            But what does that say about Bahrain? It says it’s not safe to host an F1 race. That’s thumbing your nose at the guys trying to make the event happen and telling everyone that it is completely safe.

          • Prisoner Monkeys (@prisoner-monkeys) said on 8th April 2012, 3:19

            It doesn’t say anything about Bahrain that isn’t already being said about the reports coming in of violent altercations between protestors and security forces.

          • Mike (@mike) said on 8th April 2012, 3:26

            Reports mean nothing if no one does anything about it.

          • Prisoner Monkeys (@prisoner-monkeys) said on 8th April 2012, 3:31

            @mike – That’s not my point, and you know it. You’re obviously trying to create a situation where Formula 1 has to side with either the government or the protestors. But there is a politically-neutral stance that the sport can take.

            What I’m saying is that if the race is cancelled on the grounds of safety, and the cancellation is substantiated by the reports of violent clashes between the people and the government, then it is politically neutral. Yes, the race organisers are trying to tell everyone that the country is safe enough to go ahead, and yes, it looks bad for them if the race is cancelled because the country is unsafe, but all it says about them is that they don’t have a very firm grasp of the situation in their own back yard. It won’t be a case of Formula 1 siding with the protestors.

          • Mike (@mike) said on 8th April 2012, 3:49

            You don’t see that F1 bigwigs saying Bahrain isn’t stable enough for F1 is exactly the opposite of what the Bahrain Authorities want?

            F1 not going to Bahrain is what the protesters want. F1 doesn’t have to side with them to fulfill this.

          • Prisoner Monkeys (@prisoner-monkeys) said on 8th April 2012, 4:04

            F1 not going to Bahrain is what the protesters want. F1 doesn’t have to side with them to fulfill this.

            If the race does not go ahead, the protestors will undoubtedly claim it as a victory over the government. However, the sport simply need to make it quite clear that they are not siding with anyone. After all, the clashes are between security forces and protestors. The government might be more culpable than the protestors, but that does not exonerate them. The country is currently unsafe because two opposing groups of people are fighting. If there are no security forces, there is no conflict. If there are no protestors, there is no conflict. Whatever their motives and whatever their grievances, the simple fact is that two sides in violent opposition to one another make the country unsafe. Therefore, Formula 1 can withdraw from the country whilst distancing itself from both sides of the the conflict. It does mean denying support of the protestors, but the sport is already denying support of the government.

          • damonsmedley (@damonsmedley) said on 8th April 2012, 6:11

            @Prisoner-Monkeys Are you for having the race cancelled?

          • Prisoner Monkeys (@prisoner-monkeys) said on 8th April 2012, 6:47

            @damonsmedley – As I am not currently in Bahrain, I cannot attest to the full sitaution there. However, I will broadly say that I am against the race if it is unsafe for teams, drivers, the media and spectators to attend. It is difficult to gauge exactly how safe the country is at the moment, and as the race is still two weeks away, it is conceivable – however unlikely – that any number of scenarios could play out between now and then that end the conflict.

          • damonsmedley (@damonsmedley) said on 8th April 2012, 8:03

            @Prisoner-Monkeys I’m obviously going to agree with that, but I’m also against the race if it’s being used by the Kingdom of Bahrain as a tool for pulling the wool over the world’s eyes. And so far, apart from being good for their economy (and Bernie’s pockets), I can’t see what else will come of this race being staged. The fact the government seem so desperate to hold the race is a bit suspicious to me.

            So I’m also against the race if it’s dangerous to people that are going to be at the track, but I’m completely against the race as it poses a threat to the opposition/protesters’ voices ever being heard — which is why I believe the government want it so bad. So it’s also dangerous for the citizens of Bahrain once Formula 1 leaves the country.

          • Prisoner Monkeys (@prisoner-monkeys) said on 8th April 2012, 8:38

            @damonsmedley

            I’m also against the race if it’s being used by the Kingdom of Bahrain as a tool for pulling the wool over the world’s eyes.

            I’m against that, too. But I’m equally against the protesters using it for their their own political purposes. Sport and politics should be separate. Especially in this case, because – as I’ve said a thousand times already – it opens up a nasty can of worms where races are cancelled in some countries because of human rights violations, but they take place in other countries despite similar violations.

            That’s why I think that, if the race is cancelled, the FIA should publicly announce that they are cancelling it on the grounds of safety, and to deny any political and/or moral reasoning for the cancellation.

          • BasCB (@bascb) said on 8th April 2012, 8:41

            I agree with that @prisoner-monkeys, F1 should do exactly that as its obvious for anyone who follows the news that security cannot be guaranteed without martial law and strong use of force to protect all people.

          • Prisoner Monkeys (@prisoner-monkeys) said on 8th April 2012, 8:51

            @bascb – I think the FIA will leave it to the last possible moment to decide one way or the other whether the race should go ahead. Which makes sense, since it gives everyone the best possible opportunity to get what they want.

          • BasCB (@bascb) said on 8th April 2012, 8:57

            @prisoner-monkeys, if it is cancelled, I guess you are right about the FIA wanting to wait till after the China race to be able to point to the most recent developments in arguing their point.

            Although its possible they will again leave it to the Bahraini authorities to retract their statement that they “have everything under control” as that is a key point in the FIA arguing for the race to go ahead.
            And it would keep the initiative at the Bahrain side, saving a bit of pride for them (and leaving it to them to tell Bernie to keep the race fee non the less, just like they did last year.)

          • Prisoner Monkeys (@prisoner-monkeys) said on 8th April 2012, 9:12

            @bascb – Whatever the case, they still have two weeks. Plenty of time to make a decision.

        • Hatebreeder (@hatebreeder) said on 8th April 2012, 5:05

          @mike
          Instead, F1 can also claim that there was a vote taken and majority teams didn’t want to race in Bahrain this year hence it was canceled. That I think is a neutral stand.

          • Mike (@mike) said on 8th April 2012, 15:42

            That’s a good point I think… Spose the only problem with that is that it requires the teams to co-operate.

    • Mike (@mike) said on 8th April 2012, 2:42

      For the government it means international acceptance and legitimacy for the ruling Monarchy.

      For the protesters it’s a chance to have their voices heard internationally.

      • de le rose said on 8th April 2012, 3:50

        I believe if there is a good chance that the Bahrain Gp will be more dangerous for the f1 entourage then any of the other races, they definitely shouldn’t go. There are outside security risks in all f1 races, some of the grizzly stories regarding kidnap attemps at former Brazilian gp’s spring to mind, however to the best of my knowledge, f1 staff have remained safe and no bullets have been fired on an f1 track; this record needs to remain.If the teams or there respective insurance companies perceive an increased risk than seen before at other tracks, then they shouldn’t go as it would be heartbreaking to lose lives if the route to the f1 track and the track itself are too dangerous.

        If the ruling elite are having to murder people to enable the race to continue then of course we shouldn’t go to Bahrain, no good person could kill to race

      • de le rose said on 8th April 2012, 4:01

        I think that if there is a good chance that the Bahrain Gp will be more dangerous for the f1 entourage then any of the other races, they definitely shouldn’t go. There are outside security risks in all f1 races to some degree, some of the grizzly stories regarding kidnap attemps at former Brazilian gp’s spring to mind, however to the best of my knowledge, f1 staff have remained safe and no bullets have been fired on an f1 track; this record needs to remain.If the teams or there respective insurance companies perceive an increased risk than seen before at other tracks, then they shouldn’t go as it would be heartbreaking to lose lives if the route to the f1 track and the track itself are too dangerous.

        If the ruling elite are having to murder people to enable the race to continue then of course we shouldn’t go to Bahrain, no good person could kill to race

        • Max Jacobson (@vettel1) said on 8th April 2012, 15:34

          The only problem is that Bernie wants it to go ahead…and it’s very difficult for anyone to disagree with Bernie.

          I myself am against the race; if the crimes the Bahrain government were committing during last year are still happening, make a stand and cancel the race.

    • Kevin Campos (@kcampos12) said on 8th April 2012, 20:52

      @prisoner-monkeys This is how i see it, Shouldnt the UN be involved with this rather than F1

  2. ShaneB457 (@shaneb12345678910) said on 8th April 2012, 0:28

    Anyone see the channel 4 news on Bahrain? Dont worry..it HAS to be cancelled. Protesters will disrupt the race. It is common sense that it should’nt go ahead as it is a bloody warzone..having an F1 race in Bahrain is like having one in Syria or Afghanistan..

    Ecclestone is full of greed only wanting money from this..it might look all glitz and glamour at the race but down the road people could be getting shot at for protesting..not a good advertisement for motorsport.

    • Prisoner Monkeys (@prisoner-monkeys) said on 8th April 2012, 0:55

      Ecclestone is full of greed only wanting money from this

      I disagree. Ever since Bahrain joined the calendar in 2004, we’ve seen a rapid expansion of the sport. On average, one new race has become a part of the World Championship, and there are several other countries lobbying for races. If money was the only reason why Formula 1 was going to Bahrain, it stands to reason that it would be far easier and far less of a hassle to simply cancel the race and go elsewhere.

      • Mopatop (@mopatop) said on 8th April 2012, 3:06

        Apart from that if My B broke his end of the deal, he would have to pay out the termination fees agreed in the contract. He has to wait for Bahrain to pull itself out.

        • Prisoner Monkeys (@prisoner-monkeys) said on 8th April 2012, 3:26

          @mopatop – Cancellation isn’t the same as termination. If the Bahrain Grand Prix were cancelled, it would mean that the race does not go ahead in 2012. If the contract was terminated, it would mean that the race does not go ahead ever again. Cancelling the race for any reason related to the protests would be seen as a failure of the organisers (who are funded by the government) to be ready for the race. Ecclestone wouldn’t be liable.

          • Mike (@mike) said on 8th April 2012, 3:55

            Agreed, do you know any details about the deal in which Bahrain still paid last year?

          • Prisoner Monkeys (@prisoner-monkeys) said on 8th April 2012, 4:13

            I don’t know exactly what happened, but I’m pretty sure Bernie didn’t just keep the money. He either repaid it, or he treated it as the sanctioning fee for the 2012 race, which would mean Bahrain does not have to pay this year.

          • Mike (@mike) said on 8th April 2012, 4:54

            I remember that at the time the Bahrani’s said they didn’t want the money back.

            I read it as a bribe for this year. at the time

          • Prisoner Monkeys (@prisoner-monkeys) said on 8th April 2012, 6:09

            I read it as a bribe for this year.

            Well, I think you’re over-stating that. Bahrain has to pay for the 2012 race somehow. Since they lost the 2011 race, they might as well have put the funds allocated for it to good use. Especially since they were operating under the belief that, one way or another, the uprising would be over by the time the 2012 race came around. And they were originally penned in for September-October 2012 – with the race to precede Abu Dhabi as round 17 of the championship – thereby giving them eighteen months to get their country in order. So I don’t think it was a bribe at all. It was just a case of the government thinking it was easier to let FOM have the money for the 2012 race as opposed to taking the money back and then paying it again at a later date.

  3. sato113 (@sato113) said on 8th April 2012, 2:52

    keith you haven’t said what track it was for ‘on this day…’
    it was malaysia i believe

  4. nackavich (@nackavich) said on 8th April 2012, 4:33

    Brilliant piece on Jim Clark. Would have been amazing to watch him drive in his day.
    Such talent seems so hard to surpass.

  5. craig-o (@craig-o) said on 8th April 2012, 8:40

    Yay I’m old!!!

  6. BasCB (@bascb) said on 8th April 2012, 8:52

    Thank you Keith for putting up all the background available on Bahrain. That BBC interview shows IMO how there is a deep rift in understanding of what Bahrain is like right now between Bahraini’s. The people supporting the race seem to live in a bubble of feeling things are being back to normal (possibly because of omitting news that is unfavorable in national media), and seeing how it would be good for the economy to get back to work and earn every one money.

    The people who are not satisfied with the government actions show how there was little real action taken to address the issues raised in the BIC report, nor anything done to move towards more influence for the majority in a political sense. Instead the government has turned towards systematical arresting of dissent as well as teargassing areas where protests could arise to keep everything under a blanket.

    All the reason to leave Bahrain to address its issues before going in there with over 3000 people (not sure about any foreign spectators wanting to turn up right now) and have a sporting event.

  7. Lothario said on 8th April 2012, 11:35

    Do German’ say ‘Tenner’?

  8. Theo said on 8th April 2012, 16:13

    I’m afraid these has-beens need to stop looking for obscure miracles that will grant them a magical F1 cockpit and learn to move on. Of course, I’m referring to the likes of Barrichello, Liuzzi, Trulli, Heidfeld, Chandhok and co. There’s much talent brewing in the wings, and the fact that talent like Sutil gets overlooked is already a shame in itself.

    • Skett (@skett) said on 8th April 2012, 19:20

      Really? I never really saw the big deal in Sutil, he was a fairly solid driver but I’d rate him below Heidfeld, and I’d say that 10 years ago Barichello and Trulli are were far stronger

  9. AndrewTanner (@andrewtanner) said on 8th April 2012, 20:19

    As much as I don’t rate Liuzzi, at all, I will always respect a driver who wants to cling on to the dream. After all, he’s right, this is the pinnacle. Who would REALLY want to be anywhere else?

  10. Tom L. (@tom-l) said on 8th April 2012, 21:38

    An honourable mention last time I entered the caption competition (the HRT one) and now a winner – I sense this may be the pinnacle of my caption-writing “career”! Thanks Keith!

  11. f1andy83 said on 8th April 2012, 22:01

    Bahrain is nothing special, and I dont mean the circuit, I mean the country itself. China has way worse human rights violations, if anything can be said is that Bahrain allows freedom enough that people are not afraid of speaking their mind. China doesn’t even allow that much, so why are we making a fuss about Bahrain, because of freedom, freedom of speech.

  12. Glenn Verdult said on 9th April 2012, 11:02

    Hello i am Glenn Verdult

    I enjoy reading your articles

    I am looking forward to read more..

  13. Robbie (@robbie) said on 9th April 2012, 19:19

    I agree with what Damon Hill has said about JB. I don’t think WDC JB is the same driver he was, perhaps even since last year that saw him come up a notch again, by besting LH on ‘his’ team as the relative newcomer for whom they had less data and experience compared to LH. I think no longer can it be said that LH is the better driver…not saying JB is either…just saying I think this is a whole new ballgame between these two Mac drivers and it’s going to be great fun to watch what happens this season. I think after last year the onus is more on LH to prove last year was a mix of things that went wrong for him that can be corrected, and so in that sense I think LH has more pressure on him to best JB. Let’s see how he does in this ‘pressure’ situation. He won’t want to be bested by JB again, making two years in a row.

    • Patrickl said on 10th April 2012, 10:05

      It’s more like the cars came to him. Or rather the tyres. It’s not about racing so much anymore, but about making a set of tyres last.

      • Robbie (@robbie) said on 10th April 2012, 15:31

        Fair enough, but that to me doesn’t change the fact that I think JB is better than ever, more confident than ever, and even if it’s just about making tires last these days, he’s capitalizing when the cars come to him as you say, and I think LH has his hands full with JB as a teammate.

  14. Fixy (@fixy) said on 10th April 2012, 17:39

    Me: “Of course I miss Liuzzi in Formula One”

  15. Lothario said on 11th April 2012, 1:45

    I feel a bit simpifetic (Correct me if I mispelt) for Liuzzi, having more than one year on his previous two contracts, and he gets ousted by both Force India and HRT. I took a look on the HRT website, Liuzzi isn’t an official test driver in their eyes, infact he is alongside the young Chinese driver Ma Qing Hua. I think HRT see Tonio as one of those very annoying infants who wants a go on those kids machines that are disguised as something from a TV show that they like, and he wants a, lets say, ten minute go on it but only being allowed five minutes as his older brothers (Pedro and Narain) need to meet up with their father. Maybe this way of explaining is diabolical, but you get what I mean? L

Add your comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

All comments must abide by the comment policy. Comments may be moderated.
Want to post off-topic? Head to the forum.
See the FAQ for more information.