Rate the race: 2012 Chinese Grand Prix

2012 Chinese Grand Prix

What did you think of the Chinese Grand Prix? Share your verdict on today’s race.

F1 Fanatic holds polls on each race to find out which fans thought were the best and worst races during a season.

Please vote based on how entertaining and exciting you thought the race was, not on how your preferred driver or team performed.

Rate the race out of ten and leave a comment below:

Rate the 2012 Chinese Grand Prix out of ten

  • 1 (1%)
  • 2 (0%)
  • 3 (0%)
  • 4 (0%)
  • 5 (1%)
  • 6 (2%)
  • 7 (8%)
  • 8 (24%)
  • 9 (42%)
  • 10 (22%)

Total Voters: 862

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1 = ‘Terrible’, 10 = ‘Perfect’

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290 comments on Rate the race: 2012 Chinese Grand Prix

  1. Lachie (@lachie) said on 15th April 2012, 9:54

    9/10. Had to take off a point because in the end the pit lane mechanics twice ruined what could have been big factors in an even better race.

    • JerseyF1 (@jerseyf1) said on 15th April 2012, 10:07

      Good point, without those two issues it might have been a three way battle at the front including one driver looking for a first one, one driver fighting for a serious championship attempt and possibly the greatest driver of all time trying to show he’s not completely over the hill. Though in that case the long train battling behind might not have seemed quite so exciting.

  2. xivizmath (@xivizmath) said on 15th April 2012, 9:55

    Good race, 7/10

  3. Victor. (@victor) said on 15th April 2012, 9:55

    The beginning was quite boring, the potential of the grid didn’t materialise. The end was awesome though. A shame McLaren screwed up Button’s stop – having a potential fight for the win would have made it fantastic.

  4. LolaF1 (@lolaf1) said on 15th April 2012, 9:55

    Oh My GOD! I thought Mrs LolaF1 was going to POP!

    That really is the best race i’ve seen in a long time, so close, so many banzai moments it was fantastic. Let’s hope that this season gives us many, many more races of this calibre :-)

    I shall now have to buy a new sofa after Mrs broke it jumping up & down with excitement on it.

  5. Jason said on 15th April 2012, 9:56

    The train of cars made it interesting. The last half the race was good.
    Someone fire that right rear mechanic! Didn’t they learn that last year!?!

    • F1fanNL (@) said on 15th April 2012, 10:33

      No, that was the front left man.

    • Arijit (@arijitmaniac) said on 15th April 2012, 18:41

      Well cant blame the mechanic you see…
      He was doing his job. For whatever reason the wheel failed to be secured he was trying really hard to get it secured but Michael still left. You should have seen the disappointment in his body language when the lollipop man let Michael through even though he hadn’t raised his hand indicating he was done… Well in such tense situations these mistakes can happen. I see this more as a failure to act as a team. Cant put the blame on one man.

  6. Isaac said on 15th April 2012, 9:56

    Brilliant! For the whole race 2nd to 15th was so close together as if it were a safety car restart.

  7. LucaBadoerFan (@lucabadoerfan) said on 15th April 2012, 9:58

    i give the race a solid eight – dragged in places in the opening, but certainly picked up in the middle, and of course the end too.

  8. DT (@dt) said on 15th April 2012, 9:58

    I can’t give it 10 because i expect other tracks to be better but it was a fantastic race. well done guys

  9. damonsmedley (@damonsmedley) said on 15th April 2012, 9:58

    8/10 from me. A decent amount of action and a ridiculous amount of confusion! Great to see a new winner and the finish to the race was brilliant. The middle of the race was interesting, but there wasn’t much excitement. Certainly not a 10, but maybe a 9… 9 seemed too much though, so I gave it an 8. Not as good as last year.

  10. gorgonzola said on 15th April 2012, 9:59

    Race was superb….not a 10 out of 10 first half was interesting as nobody passed anybody….

    Amazing to think that people are payed to stick out Kimi on soft tires in the end for so long…. and to have him fall in the first stint and not react to McLaren. A bit embarrassing…. Well done Nico Rosberg will be interesting to see if teams catch up to that double drs what will happen….Amazing how there is a host for teams arguing against the double drs But as soon as somebody makes a comment regarding the legality, he has no clue :)

    heheheh children.

  11. Kneejerk reaction from me, Keith will possibly rip it apart in the race analysis:

    The three-stoppers comprehensively destroyed each other’s race (with the generous help of the Massa-train and the Raikkönnen-train).

    The moral is that such a hectic race benefits the cautious, unimaginative, un-racy two-stopping strategy.

    Other than that, Nico would have had trouble staying clear of Jenson, and the Williams cars would have had nothing to do in the top 10.

    • gorgonzola said on 15th April 2012, 10:02

      “The moral is that such a hectic race benefits the cautious, unimaginative, un-racy two-stopping strategy.”

      VERY well said exact thought were going through my mind…. as i was watching that horror on TV ….Kimis strategy in particular seems to be put together with a 4 year old….

    • DaveW (@dmw) said on 15th April 2012, 10:16

      Ill back you up. The three stoppers were liked the keystone cops while rosberg ran away wiith the loot.it was good racing but how much time did mclaren lose trying to pass perez and Maldonado about 3 times each? Probably they thought the mbs would just fall back and be dealt with on overlap.

    • david said on 15th April 2012, 10:37

      Right– Had Nico gone with a 3 stop race, he would never have been bothered by Button even remotely. He would not have ended up behind any of the trains, either, and he would have been able to drive faster and harder on the tires he had effectively giving him more space between him and #2 during the early part of each stint. c’mon now, think.

      • gorgonzola said on 15th April 2012, 10:47

        I think we where talking about other drivers as Nico had plenty in the pocket…

      • “He would not have ended up behind any of the trains”

        I don’t think you can absolutely be sure of that. It’s enough to get stuck behind a single two-stopper for just a couple of laps and you’re strategy goes down the drain, even if an actual “train” does not build up behind you during this time.

        Rosberg’s advantage before the last round of pit stops was never large enough to make him completely immune to such an outcome.

    • HoHum (@hohum) said on 15th April 2012, 11:26

      I reckon Ros. had the pace to win on 3 stops if they had gone that way. Vettel had one less stop than than Webber but that didn’t work out for him. Kimi needed an extra stop as did the Saubers. You can’t blame the teams that got there tyre wear predictions right for being held up by the teams that got it wrong.

      • Kimi and Sergio did need an extra stop, but Kamui seemed to be on a regular three-stopper.

        The dividing line is not between “teams that got there tyre wear predictions right” and “the teams that got it wrong”.

        It was between the number of pit stops.

        Webber and Vettel were so close in the end because one run the frustrating 3-stop race, the other the fortunate 2-stopper.

        Button lost the chance to chase down Rosberg because one run the 3-stop race, the other the 2-stopper.

        Kobayashi lost out to the Williams (and Grosjean’s Lotus) because of the same reason.

        No-one could tell in advance that a certain pit stop strategy will prove to be so superior to the alternative one across the board. It was pure luck, of which you needed as much in China as in any rain-affected madness.

    • AlexNK said on 15th April 2012, 11:31

      There was nothing hectic about that race (well, maybe apart from those two pit-stop blunders that definitely affected the outcome). Pardon for stating the obvious, but race strategies are not a gift from heaven, they are produced by the drivers and race engineers and take into account a lot of factors, most importantly – the ability of a driver to lap at a certain speed for a certain amount of time. If a driver is unable to do so, he runs into trouble.
      The race was fairly tactical for the first 2/3, and those who planned according to their abilities have come up ahead of those, who, like Raikkonen and Sauber boys, clearly overestimated their abilities to preserve their tyres. But there were absolutely no ‘force majeure’ like rain or pace cars to make the race hectic.

      • If you really knew who was actually where throughout the race in terms of strategy (whether it was their real position or a glory position to enjoy just before pitting, how many pit stops for them yet to remain, whether they will return to clear air or the back of a train, tyre wear issues, etc.), then I applaud you, and then perhaps for you it wasn’t hectic.

        I saw a lot of great overtakers stuck behind others. Either all of them forgot to race and overtake, or, perhaps, there were situations where overtaking was actually really difficult.

        Three-stoppers proved to run the risk of getting stuck much more than is usual at other races, which, if not a ‘force majeure’ in the regular sense, is at least something you cannot really expect in advance, especially not at a track where it’s “so easy” to overtake.

        If “the ability of a driver to lap at a certain speed for a certain amount of time” is, as you say, the most important prerequisite for creating strategies, then saying this race was not hectic seems a contradiction, because the main consequence of the trains was that, for many drivers, it was made next to impossible to actually lap at a certain, pre-calculated speed for a certain amount of time.

        Most of the two-stoppers could basically trundle along, occasionally overtaking or being overtaken not making much of a difference in the long run, while the recurring speed advantage of three-stoppers was again and again nullified by the “sacrificial” two-stoppers (Massa and Raikkönnen, who ultimately lost out, but in the process paved the way for the other two-stoppers).

        • AlexNK said on 15th April 2012, 14:04

          You only needed to follow what top 8 drivers or so were doing, really. The likes of Petrov, Ricciardo, DiResta etc. didn’t matter. With these Pirellis this race was as regular as it’s going to be this season. Perhaps the teams will improve their tyre consumption a bit as the season progresses, but not by much, since these tyres are designed this way.
          Regarding the strategies, there were definitely some gambles that substituted actual calculations. What in the world gave Raikkonen the idea he can last 27 laps on one set of tyres without losing the pace completely? On the other hand, Vettel has made his tyres last a necessary amount of time (even though he was in traffic all the time) and *almost* got to the podium from P14. Rosberg and his engineers were perfect with the estimation of his ability to preserve the tyres (helped by the lack of on track action, of course), so a 2-stop strategy worked for him like a charm.
          Once again, there wasn’t a default winning or losing strategy this day, it was all down to drivers to make it work. Merc, Macca & RB did (both 3-stop and 2-stop), some others struggled. I do believe we will be seeing a lot more races like that in the future, because with KERS and DRS now neither the track position nor raw speed is the king, but the state of your tyres.

  12. Leftie (@leftie) said on 15th April 2012, 10:00

    How can you rate THAT race lower than 10? Not even a tenth of a point lower, 10 out of 10, what a spectacle, i was screaming and shouting watching it like never before, it was one of the best dry races i saw since 1996 if not the best. Strategies was all over the place, DRS was perfect (wasn’t it?), racing was as close as it gets, overtaking was clean, bold and exciting…i really don’t know what was wrong with the grand prix to give it less than 10. If the reason is the result, there’s is a separate poll for that. Let me congratulate all my fellow F1 fanatics with an incredible event we just witnessed.

    • DaveW (@dmw) said on 15th April 2012, 10:18

      Because it was won by 20 seconds and the outcome was never in serious doubt.

      • Kingshark (@kingshark) said on 15th April 2012, 10:38

        It was in serious doubt, until around 15 laps until the end.

        I can understand why not everyone is rating it particularly high, but I personally rate in nothing under a 9. The second half was an entertainment spectacular.

        • DaveW (@dmw) said on 15th April 2012, 17:13

          No. Button was less than 10s up when he stopped and losing gobs of time to rosberg at the time. Button certainly did not express your view in the fia interview. By midway rosberg clearly had the race by the throat. Indeed it was buttons botched stop that precipitated the great but ham web battle. For 2nd.

  13. Dizzy said on 15th April 2012, 10:01

    Think the race showed why we don’t need DRS.

    DRS should be banned ASAP!

    • SouthPawRacer (@southpawracer) said on 15th April 2012, 10:03

      I think DRS added to the experience this time…

    • F1 98 said on 15th April 2012, 10:17

      Drs added the excitement

    • matt90 (@matt90) said on 15th April 2012, 10:36

      I don’t particularly like DRS, but it worked fairly well here. I didn’t see too many motorway passes- most of the serious and important passes still happened in the braking zone.

      • Keith Collantine (@keithcollantine) said on 15th April 2012, 10:46

        I didn’t see too many motorway passes

        I saw far too many, particularly from Button in the middle part of the race. Only once or twice did the pass actually happen at the hairpin, most of the time the pass was done well before.

        What’s more, the leading driver knew it was inevitable and didn’t even bother to defend, which is a persuasive sign the pendulum has swung too far.

        • HoHum (@hohum) said on 15th April 2012, 11:31

          Right,right,right.

        • matt90 (@matt90) said on 15th April 2012, 11:37

          Fair enough. I may have just been blinded by the over-taking in the last 10 laps, which seemed to involve more hairpin passes.

          • Mike said on 15th April 2012, 11:49

            i think this race would have been better without drs.

            button made the point that with drs you max out your top speed earlier down the straght which when in a group of cars makes it harder to pass because everyone hits there top speed at about the same point half way down the straght.
            with no drs & just the natural slipstream it takes longer to pick up speed & everyone hits there max speed at different points which produces better racing.

            compare the racing down that straght here with drs to races before drs & you easily see that the racing down this straght pre-drs was better.

            when drs was announced they said that some races would be run without drs (for some reason this hasnt occured yet) & i think this is one of them that should have no drs in the future as i dont think its needed.

          • Matty No 2 (@mattynotwo) said on 16th April 2012, 1:49

            “compare the racing down that straght here with drs to races before drs & you easily see that the racing down this straght pre-drs was better.”
            Sorry, no it was’nt.

            “button made the point that with drs you max out your top speed earlier down the straght which when in a group of cars makes it harder to pass because everyone hits there top speed at about the same point half way down the straght.
            with no drs & just the natural slipstream it takes longer to pick up speed & everyone hits there max speed at different points which produces better racing.”

            If, on a 1km straight cars are hitting the limit to early, that,s not
            the fault of DRS, it’s the fault of wrong setting’s causing the car to
            be hitting the rev limiter.

            Overall, I think, after seeing many car’s in a DRS train, the team,s’ , are obviously, not setting the cars
            up correctly, to use DRS correctly.

            Maybe ,in the future, team,s can find a solution to the fact that thier cars are hitting the limit so early on a 1km straight.

  14. melkurion (@melkurion) said on 15th April 2012, 10:02

    Off to a slow race start, but the last third of the race was amazing ! So many overtakes, fights and a dukes of hazzard action from webber! Shame for Raikonnen, but what a race!! 9/10

  15. Way to much confusion to thoroughly enjoy it as a proper race, though obviously very exciting as a brawl.

    • JerseyF1 (@jerseyf1) said on 15th April 2012, 10:21

      They should ban overtaking, keep it easy to follow.

      • For a truly great race, there is a proper middle-ground. I don’t like the chess-game type races that are all about strategy, but neither a relentless, random “fist fight” like this. Did I enjoy the individual scraps happening all the time? Yes, I did, and they will make excellent material for race (and season) highlights. Did those scraps add up to any meaningful race? No.

        • paul_E80 said on 15th April 2012, 11:59

          i agree.

          its why i dont think this was as great a race as people here seem to think. yes the individual scraps were fun to watch, however as a race it wasn’t that good.

          i think people today have either forgotten or simply don’t get what a proper race actually is. they see a million passes & go on about how great it was yet never look at the full picture.

          its why so many people are turning off nascar now, what you get over there now is not a race & people are finally starting to see that & those who want to see a proper race & now turning off.
          i predict that another 2-3 years of this style F1 & people will do the same.

      • F1fanNL (@) said on 15th April 2012, 10:37

        +1.

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