Other drivers cost Alonso 30 points – Montezemolo

2012 Japanese Grand Prix

Luca di Montezemolo, Ferrari, Monza, 2012Ferrari president Luca di Montezemolo urged his team to “hold its nerve” after Fernando Alonso’s lead in the drivers’ championship was cut to four points in Japan.

“I will speak to Fernando by phone soon to give him even more motivation with which to tackle these last five races, with the bit between his teeth, as indeed I expect all the team to do,” Montezemolo continued.

“Yesterday?s second place for Felipe [Massa] was very important in this final part of the season when his contribution is even more vital. I expect a huge effort from our engineers who have already shown they are capable of that and we are perfectly aware that this championship is still in our hands.”

Montezemolo added his driver would have a healthier lead but for the mistakes of others.

“We know we can count on the strongest driver around at the moment and it?s only mistakes from others at Spa and again at Suzuka, that have prevented him from having a more comfortable lead over his rivals.

“Let?s not forget that, but for those two collisions, today Fernando would have had at least 30 points more and that?s a conservative estimate. In sport, as in life, the wheel turns and we must not forget that: recently, it has not done so in a positive way for us, but it does not take much for it to change direction.”

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104 comments on Other drivers cost Alonso 30 points – Montezemolo

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  1. disjunto (@disjunto) said on 8th October 2012, 11:45

    Apparently Ferrari (and Sky) wanted Kimi to vanish off the road to avoid Alonso claiming the tarmac, and eventually his front wing as his own space.

    Guess they’ve forgotten how many points all their rivals have lost due to mistakes by others

    • Keith Collantine (@keithcollantine) said on 8th October 2012, 11:51

      @disjunto The Spa crash was Grosjean’s fault so that’s a fair point.

      But I don’t think Raikkonen can be blamed for the Suzuka crash any more than Alonso was. And the stewards clearly see it that way or Raikkonen would have had a penalty.

      • sorin (@) said on 8th October 2012, 12:53

        +1 . If I were Raikkonen I would appeal Alonso for front wing destruction, only to demonstrate that it was Alonso’s fault 110%.

      • ka (@ka12) said on 8th October 2012, 15:32

        Very well said Keith, one more time I see Luca is as arrogant enough as Alonso.

        • Tom (@newdecade) said on 9th October 2012, 17:09

          I think it’s a sign of how Ferrari are becoming increasingly worried with fernandos wdc position. He very rarely makes driving errors but when he does, you can tell he’s under pressure. Even in singapore he came terrifyingly close to losing it all before even arriving at turn 1.

      • Althasil (@althasil) said on 8th October 2012, 16:02

        Absolutely. Could Montezemolo have been suggesting that Alonso would have qualified higher, and therefore avoided any first lap incidents, were it not for Kimi’s spin in Q3? If that was his point I still wouldn’t agree. That first lap for Alonso was unfortunately his own doing. I’m not saying there was anything malicious or reckless about it – it was a first lap/corner incident and it was only by the finest of margins that Alonso’s rear tyre got caught out by Kimi’s wing.

      • Pedro Costa (@pnunocosta) said on 8th October 2012, 16:10

        (@keithcollantine) I think that most of all it was an easily avoidable incident. Should Kimi backed off half a meter, which he usually does (p.e Valencia start) because he is fair and prudent and normally doesn´t risk accidents at nearly 250 kph or Alonso didn´t move 30 cm to his left just before corner 1, this very small concessions would prevent the accident.
        The two main conclusions from this accident in my opinion are:
        1. Alonso was counting with Kimi being prudent as usual – that was his mistake
        2. Kimi didn´t back off because if there was a crash his rival in the championship would lose points and he would get closer to the front in the WDC

        • joebloggs said on 8th October 2012, 16:44

          @Pedro: Your point number 2 fails because a crash also puts Kimi at risk of being taken out and losing points. The fact that Kimi’s car was not damaged was pure luck.

        • Peter C said on 8th October 2012, 20:00

          excuse me raising this, but your second point here is unfair and dare I say, unseemly. Whatever your opinion of Kimi, you have to acknowledge his sense of fairness. He is no saint, but more than any driver I’ve seen these last 20 years, he is least likely to try taking out another driver for the purpose of benefiting in the title race. Alonso, Hamilton, certainly. Many others, probably. Kimi, no. And I defy you to give one example of that kind of behaviour involving Kimi.
          If you honestly think that he would, then you are not a good or impartial judge of character

        • Adam1 (@adam1) said on 8th October 2012, 22:39

          I have to point to Alonso’s own words earlier in the season “all the time you have to leave a space” as Kimi was being forced off the track Alonso was not following his own rule!
          Oh but I forget it’s one rule for Fernando and another for everyone else right?!

      • Nick (@nick101) said on 10th October 2012, 11:59

        Ferrari wind me up more and more!

        Alonso is just lucky he hasn’t had more retirements due to contact that has been entirely his fault!

        Everyone blames Grosjean for the accident at the start of the Monaco race, but I suggest everyone go to youtube and search for ‘Grosjean onboard start monaco’.

        That accident and Grosjeans subsequent retirement from the race was 100% Alonso’s fault!

        He is a bully on track and has been TOTALLY lucky to not have more retirements, let alone penalties!

        • Roger Camp (@rogercamp) said on 10th October 2012, 13:34

          I agree. there was no room to for Alonso to pass between Hamilton and Grosjean without forcing a contact. It seems Alonso really believes everyone else should let him pass. Tsk tsk.

    • minnis (@minnis) said on 8th October 2012, 12:07

      Exactly. Hamilton has lost way more than that just due to his team’s mistakes!

    • davidnotcoulthard said on 8th October 2012, 12:36

      Guess they’ve forgotten how many points all their rivals have lost due to mistakes by others

      I assume you were referring to Valencia (Which cost 2 drivers), Malaysia, Spa (This time including Lewis), and perhaps the tyre marbles at China?

      • JCost (@jcost) said on 8th October 2012, 14:53

        In Valencia Alonso also jumped Hamilton at the pits after another awful service of McLaren boys…

      • The Blade Runner (@thebladerunner) said on 9th October 2012, 16:02

        As much as I admire both Alonso and Ferrari, it is statements like this one from Montezemolo that ultimately turn me off. I would compare it to the “continental” style of playing football i.e. trying everything possible to gain an advantage or to influence the decisions made by officials. Fernando does it over the team radio during the race too.

        If it wasn’t for mechanical failure, racing incidents, the stupidity of others and seemingly unfair stewards’ decisions (Hamilton in Spain) etc. then the Championship table would look very different with Vettel probably out front and Hamilton likely second. Michael Schumacher would also be in a far more favourable position.

        **** happens Mr. Montezemolo. Ferrari and Alonso need to stop playing the “victim” card and get on with the rest of the season

    • Angelica said on 9th October 2012, 3:00

      This video explains quite well why it was Alonso’s fault. Of course Alonso ended up punishing himself so therefore it was a racing incident:

      http://indavideo.hu/video/Rajt_2012_Japan_F1

  2. FormulaLes said on 8th October 2012, 11:47

    I cannot believe I’m going to say this, but Luca di Montezemolo does make a good point. No doubt some will put forward the argument that Vettel would also have more points if it wasn’t for the alternator issues, but that would be comparing apples with oranges.

  3. Ella (@ella) said on 8th October 2012, 11:48

    I love my team but man sometimes LDM makes them hard to support. As did Alonso with his comments yesterday. As hard as it is to admit, the contact with Raikkonen was due to Alonso’s aggressiveness. He got away with it in Monaco – just – not so, this time. Simple as that.

    In saying that though, their determination is heartening – nice to see. Wouldn’t expect anything less.

    • BasCB (@bascb) said on 8th October 2012, 12:09

      I feel sympathy with your plight @Ella

      To me the line about him going on the phone with Alonso to motivate him is pretty strange as well. As if Alonso needed motivating from LDM, rahter Alonso will tell him to get behind those car updates that keep eluding them!

      • Kimi4WDC said on 8th October 2012, 14:14

        LDM is a Berlusconi wannabe.

      • Ella (@ella) said on 9th October 2012, 11:08

        @bascb – Completely agree! Insinuating that he actually needs to motivate Alonso actually made me laugh. Somehow I don’t think Alonso’s ever had a motivational problem (well apart from ’08 and ’09). Especially when he’s sniffing the hint of a championship.
        A scent which is fading more and more with every race.

    • Luca is making rather ridiculous excuses; if Hamilton or Vettel hadn’t had their various incidents, car failures and pit stop blunders they’d be way ahead of Alonso in the championship.
      Luca, learn that racing is after all racing, you can’t control everything. And just for the record, the crash was Alonso’s fault, not Räikkönen’s.

  4. Eggry (@eggry) said on 8th October 2012, 11:49

    Surely Not-fastest-car costs him at least 50 points.

  5. Alexander (@alexanderfin) said on 8th October 2012, 11:51

    “at least 30 points more and that’s a conservative estimate”
    Retired from 5th and 6th, for me its quite overestimated.

    • TheManyHamiltons said on 8th October 2012, 12:53

      Retired from 5th and 6th, for me its quite overestimated

      ain’t that the fact!!!

    • Dave (@davea86) said on 8th October 2012, 15:05

      In Spa Massa started 14th (9 places behind Alonso) and finished 5th. Admittedly there were quite a few cars ahead of him that didn’t get past the first corner but he had great pace and finished ahead of Webber who qualified 7 places ahead of him.

      In Japan Massa started 10th (4 places behind Alonso) and finished 2nd driving what looked like the 2nd fastest car.

      All year Alonso has been faster than Massa in race pace so it’s not a stretch to say that Alonso could have finished 3rd in both races, scoring exactly 30 points.

      • joe123 said on 8th October 2012, 17:00

        @dave86

        Bang on – Massa is the form driver of the prancing horse.

        LDM should sack Alonso (so he can go fight in the mountains and fight the sea – whatever that tweet was about) make Massa No.1

        Then recruit le baron rouge to help develop what is a woeful car – and with no windtunnel in the kingdom (they need to go to the fatherland and borrow one) next years car will be just as shameful.

        The Rainmeister will once again be their standard bearer and restore the kingdom and their greatness will be known far into the lands of the east once more.

        These shitake mushrooms have a most pungent taste.

      • Alexander (@alexanderfin) said on 8th October 2012, 17:38

        In Japan Massa gained 6 position at the start because of the accidents, in Spa he gained 3 places… At the end of Spa he got two places when MS and MW had sudden really bad tyre wear and had to do a third pitstop.

        Don’t compare drivers results because they depend on so many things, the speed can be compared though.

        • Dave (@davea86) said on 9th October 2012, 7:18

          @alexanderfin I mentioned the first lap crash at Spa although I’ll admit I did leave out the crash at Suzuka. As for the sudden rear tyre wear, that’s racing. Could be either that the Ferrari was easier on it’s tyres, Massa was better at looking after them or both. If anything that reinforces my point that Alonso could have finished well if the Schumacher and Webber had tyre issues and the one remaining Ferrari didn’t.

          I’ll edit my post leaving out the results:

          In Spa Massa … had great pace and finished ahead of Webber who qualified 7 places ahead of him.

          In Japan Massa … finished … driving what looked like the 2nd fastest car.

          All year Alonso has been faster than Massa in race pace so it’s not a stretch to say that Alonso could have finished 3rd in both races, scoring exactly 30 points.

          I think the point I was making still stands.

    • Gosjean said on 8th October 2012, 17:38

      Alonso was up to 3rd in Spa at the time of the accident. I can’t stand some of the goons on here that talk about luck. Vettel’s alternator breakdowns aren’t the same as a racing incident. A racing incident is an unfortunate coming together. Alternator failure is reliability, sometimes a slower car is more reliable than a fast car. So don’t say Alonso’s 2 dnfs now match Vettel’s… Vettels two were all their own doing.

      • David-A (@david-a) said on 8th October 2012, 21:26

        Yet people make a such big deal about Alonso leading the points standings in an “inferior” car, when it has superior reliability compared to RB and Mclaren.

        You can’t have it both ways- either unreliability counts as bad luck, or better reliability counts is a factor in Ferrari being a genuinely good enough car for this title.

      • xjr15jaaag (@xjr15jaaag) said on 8th October 2012, 21:26

        Not really; it wasn’t Vettels fault, and Alonsos retirement from Spa wasn’t his fault either; they are both unforseen circumstances, which equate to bad luck; I fail to see Webbers alternator failing

      • Alexander (@alexanderfin) said on 8th October 2012, 22:53

        Alonso was barelyalmost fourth in Spa, and if the accident wouldn’t have happened I don’t think he even could have taken fourth.

  6. Anders Fors said on 8th October 2012, 12:01

    Well Luca,why don’t we just scrap the racing and just qualify ?

  7. vickyy (@vickyy) said on 8th October 2012, 12:16

    Some blokes are agonizingly repulsive in F1, in RBR we have Helmot marko and here Mr. LDM.

  8. coefficient (@coefficient) said on 8th October 2012, 12:17

    It seems to be LDM’s belief that Ferrari are entitled to win by virtue of the fact that they bother to turn up and any success achieved by their opponents is undeserved. He really is an odd little man.

  9. Osvaldas31 (@osvaldas31) said on 8th October 2012, 12:18

    Montezemolo is good only at saying inspirational speaches, but nothing else. Of course, Alonso lost some points due to Grosjean in Spa, but to blame Kimi for yesterday’s incident… It seems that only Ferrari are always right and only others make mistakes.

  10. Pete (@repete86) said on 8th October 2012, 12:48

    Had Maldonado made the same move on Kimi, there would have been outcry and a penalty. Alonso did something stupid and it ended up hurting him. Luckily he didn’t take anyone else out at the same time, but had he done that to a lesser driver than Raikkonen, it could have been ugly. There’s only one person to blame for this and no one at Ferrari, Alonso included, are man enough to admit it.

    • Skett (@skett) said on 8th October 2012, 22:39

      Lets face it, it wasn’t drastically dissimilar to Grosjean’s move at Spa. If they’re going by the crime rather than the results then Alonso deserves a race ban!
      (Yes I do realise part of the reason for Grosjean’s race ban was that it had happened a lot)

  11. GeeMac (@geemac) said on 8th October 2012, 12:57

    “I will speak to Fernando by phone soon to give him even more motivation with which to tackle these last five races.”

    Must…resist…making…comment…

  12. Hotbottoms (@hotbottoms) said on 8th October 2012, 13:02

    I think Alonso’s move was pretty much the same as Grosjean’s in Spa. The fact that Ferrari and Alonso are trying to put the blame on Räikkönen is just disgusting.

  13. 5150 (@) said on 8th October 2012, 13:05

    Raikkonen is the cleanest and fairest driver of them all. Perhaps not aggressive enough as some would say. He’s been criticised for that this year. But this is the first ‘mayor’ incident this year. He came close to losing front wing to Vettel in Silverstone, but that’s about it. As long as i can recall. Then again i might be wrong.
    If all the drivers would drive like Kimi, races would have far less incidents .

    • HeX (@) said on 8th October 2012, 15:47

      Truth is Raikkonen simply has one of the best racecraft out there of the current drivers.

      Just take Valencia for example. While Maldonado was muscling all over Raikkonen, he took precautionary actions to avoid any unnecessary incidents. Raikkonen pushed hard, yet also managed to keep it clean with Maldonado too, allowing him to gain positions well to earn his strong results thus far.

    • RACERNORRISKI (@racernorriski) said on 8th October 2012, 20:20

      Absolutely correct and true about Kimi’s driving style. I might say the same goes for Button as well…………….

    • BBT (@bbt) said on 8th October 2012, 21:43

      Exactly look how he avoided Hamilton, great awareness and fair driving from Raikkonen. With Alonso there was nothing he could do, IMO.

      • Totally agree with all of that and exactly wanted to point out the Lewis incident. Only lightning reflexes and super fairness from Kimi prevented that from becoming a crash.

        If Kimi is not the fastest driver he is without a doubt the cleanest and least “princessy” in the field!

        Yes, Fernando’s continuous squeezing was quite similar to what Grosjean was banned for and he could easily have cost a lot more drivers a DNF so stop whining Luca and face reality: Fernando’s own desperate mistakes have cost you just as much as all the other drivers put together have cost you and despite what you seem to believe – they DO have right to be on the track as well!

  14. AndrewTanner (@andrewtanner) said on 8th October 2012, 13:11

    Part of the game I’m afraid Luca! However, I can appreciate why it will hurt Ferrari more as their bad luck is coming towards the back end of the season with Spa, Monza and Suzuka.

  15. mixwell (@mixwell) said on 8th October 2012, 13:38

    i wonder if he said something similar about Petrov in 2010

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