HRT missing from FIA’s 2013 F1 entry list

2013 F1 season

Pedro de la Rosa, HRT, Interlagos, 2012HRT do not appear on the 2013 F1 entry list published by the FIA.

The deadline for entries to the 2013 F1 season passed yesterday. HRT was put up for sale last month.

The list does not include the identities of Sauber, Toro Rosso or Caterham’s drivers, though most of these have been confirmed by the teams.

Force India and Marussia’s drivers are listed as yet to be confirmed, as is the identity of Kimi Raikkonen’s team mate at Lotus.

It also indicates that Nico Rosberg will use the number nine at Mercedes next year and new team mate Lewis Hamilton’s car will bear the number ten.

2012 F1 season


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Image ?? HRT F1 Team

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96 comments on HRT missing from FIA’s 2013 F1 entry list

  1. Why is Kimi #7 instead of #5 despite finishing third in standings? Are the numbers based on constructors’ standings after top two drivers? This has always has confused me…

    • David (@neiana) said on 2nd December 2012, 1:50

      They go by constructors’ standings period.

      • Prisoner Monkeys (@prisoner-monkeys) said on 2nd December 2012, 2:20

        No, they don’t.

        Jenson Button was the 2009 World Drivers’ Champion. Brawn GP was the 2009 World Constructors’ Champion. Button moved to McLaren, where he carried the number 1 in 2010, even though McLaren finished the season third overall. Because of this Mercedes – once they had bought out Brawn – got the numbers 3 and 4. Red Bull got the numbers 5 and 6, even though they would normally have been 3 and 4 themselves as they had finished second in the constructors’ standings. Ferrari finished fourth and got the numbers 7 and 8, as they were supposed to.

        • David (@neiana) said on 2nd December 2012, 10:03

          Thanks. I’m reading this at 4am and it took a couple times but with your explanation I think I get it. :) I always assumed it was according to constructors’ only.

    • FlyingLobster27 said on 2nd December 2012, 9:37

      Drivers’ champion gets number 1, his team-mate gets 2, no matter the team (Arrows got 1 & 2 in 1997…).
      All the other teams are numbered according the Constructors’ championship. If the Drivers’ champion retires, the Constructors’ champions can use 0 & 2 instead of 1 & 2 (Lotus used 1 & 2 in 1974, Williams used 0 & 2 in 1993 & 1994).

      • FlyingLobster27 said on 2nd December 2012, 9:41

        And I add that that’s the system that’s been used since 1996. Prior to that (1974-1995), teams were classified according to the 1973 Constructors’ championship, with only the Drivers’ champion’s team exchanging their previous numbers with the 1 & 2 team.
        Which is how Ferrari famously ended up running the very high numbers 27 & 28 for so long: they were the reigning champions when Alan Jones won in 1980 for the relatively new Williams team, numbered 27 & 28.

  2. Will Bryan (@willbryan) said on 2nd December 2012, 4:01

    So what does that mean for Q1? will just the slowest 5 drivers be knocked out?

  3. Joey Zyla (@) said on 2nd December 2012, 5:18

    Goodbye, HRT. *sniff* :(

  4. Todfod (@todfod) said on 2nd December 2012, 8:03

    Why is everyone so sad about HRT leaving the grid? I’m sure the staff will actually find something that pays them better, as well as, brings them more pride and respect in their jobs.

    I always thought HRT didn’t belong in this sport and I think its good riddance to bad rubbish.

    Wonder how this affects Q1 of qualifying though?

    • Prisoner Monkeys (@prisoner-monkeys) said on 2nd December 2012, 8:27

      @todfod

      Wonder how this affects Q1 of qualifying though?

      Someone raised this question in the forums about a week ago. I’m pretty sure Keith pointed to a passage of the sporting regulations that says six cars will be eliminated in Q1 and six in Q2.

  5. wasiF1 (@wasif1) said on 2nd December 2012, 8:50

    I bit shame for the team but I guess it’s for the best as the team wasn’t going anywhere,it’s pointless competing in F1 if you can’t help yourself.

  6. MahavirShah (@mahavirshah) said on 2nd December 2012, 14:33

    Sigh, and so the HRT saga ends. I am sure a lot of people will be genuinely saddened by their exit. Maybe the owners of F1 should take a look at this and see what is going wrong. Any new team will need more support, support which was clearly not provided to the new three teams. Sure, they were banking on the RRA coming through which did not happen, but even then this situation should have been looked at. How many new teams have joined the sport in the last 10 years, how many have left. I doubt the days when private entrepreneurs could launch a team and hope to win, like the Tyrells, Tolemans etc… could ever return.
    Enough encouragement will have to be given even if it is a big car manufacturer to enter the sport. Only the management can provide this.

  7. AndrewTanner (@andrewtanner) said on 2nd December 2012, 17:23

    Not happy about this, at all :( I’m not going to back a team just because they’re the back of the grid, but they had made progress in trying to capitalise on a Spanish identity in many ways. This year they managed to retain their two drivers they started with, started up a young driver programme and just generally appeared to be making progress.

    Such a shame, I’ll miss them.

  8. Kobayashi should be a good teammate to Kimi at Lotus, Kovalainen seams to slow now.

  9. tigen (@tigen) said on 2nd December 2012, 18:55

    Not good for F1 to lose teams, but I can’t say I’ll miss one so slow as HRT. I primarily will remember them for being rolling obstacles… one that might have killled Rosberg and might have decided the championship when Vettel clipped Karthikeyan, or was that vice-versa…

    It’s nice to see Marussia and Caterham seemingly in decent health and spirit and having ambitions for the future.

  10. This is Honda’s ticket back into Formula One.. If Honda buys them, they can just change the name from Hispania Racing Team (HRT) to Honda Racing Team (HRT). And start building the team from ground up again.

    • Prisoner Monkeys (@prisoner-monkeys) said on 3rd December 2012, 7:41

      @ra186e – You’re assuming they want to get back in immediately, though. One of Honda’s bosses recently said that they would like to come back, but he added that it won’t happen until Honda succeeds in the World Touring Car Championship. By that time (and assuming no-one else wants to enter Formula 1), control of HRT’s entry will have defaulted to the FIA (who already hold the thirteenth entry).

  11. Debojyoti Roy said on 5th December 2012, 17:06

    I am Indian and in HRT two Indian drivers Narain Karthikeyan and Karun Chandhok drove.It is sad for me…..I supported HRT

  12. Richard Johns said on 26th December 2012, 11:44

    Not at all bothered by HRT failing to make the grid. F1 has been going backwards for some years now with the grid being filled by no-hope teams and pay for seat drivers. I would much rather see a smaller grid with competitive teams and see some actual racing rather than a procession of blue flags telling the no hopers to get out of the way. Also, the number of rookies and pay for seat drivers should be limited by the FIA, the number of drivers who are actually deserving of a seat is declining every season to the never ending procession of rookies and drivers who bring big fat cheques with them.

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