2013 Australian Grand Prix lap times and fastest laps

2013 Australian Grand Prix

Jean-Eric Vergne, Toro Rosso, Melbourne, 2013Kimi Raikkonen left no one in any doubt about the Lotus’s ability to look after its tyres by setting the fastest lap of the race two laps from home on tyres that were older than his pursuers’.

The second-fastest lap of the race went to Jean-Eric Vergne, who finished out of the points but told his team he had a sense of the Toro Rosso’s potential after his strong end to the race.

Surprisingly Jules Bianchi set the 11th-fastest lap of the race in the Marussia, while using super-soft tyres in his final stint – quicker than Adrian Sutil could manage on the same tyres in his Force India.

Ferrari’s performance advantage over Red Bull was clear during the first stint. But only Fernando Alonso was able to get into free air to take advantage of it, jumping past Sebastian Vettel (and Felipe Massa) at the first round of stops.

Bot neither of them could hold a candle to Raikkonen, who had the twin luxuries of being able to make his tyres last longer while lapping quicker.

Australian Grand Prix lap times

All the lap times by the drivers (in seconds, very slow laps excluded):

http://www.f1fanatic.co.uk/charts/2013drivercolours.csv

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58
Sebastian Vettel 99.646 93.106 93.55 94.374 94.496 94.748 112.236 99.173 92.317 92.209 92.69 92.239 92.587 93.665 93.586 93.756 93.494 93.609 93.524 93.644 111.776 97.277 91.657 91.379 92.268 92.667 92.545 92.14 92.911 93.037 93.154 92.839 91.577 91.318 91.538 92.125 109.744 96.665 90.89 91.11 90.459 90.409 90.589 90.723 91.029 91.073 91.064 91.695 91.097 91.068 90.998 90.807 90.966 91.182 90.793 90.883 91.285 92.185
Mark Webber 105.114 95.602 95.077 95.639 116.041 98.852 93.964 94.301 94.493 94.087 94.199 93.83 93.682 93.776 95.071 93.981 94.195 112.317 97.075 91.543 92.43 92.094 91.815 92.161 92.682 93.227 92.617 93.737 95.252 93.254 92.588 92.843 92.395 91.998 92.434 93.099 93.111 110.332 97.367 90.053 90.079 91.534 90.562 90.164 89.732 90.072 90.047 90.62 90.612 90.084 93.726 90.694 90.388 90.528 91.136 90.443 90.676 90.6
Lewis Hamilton 103.828 95.414 94.03 94.047 94.607 95.715 95.068 94.453 93.935 93.746 93.197 93.208 112.056 99.872 93.641 92.891 92.211 93.195 93.547 93.176 93.402 93.105 92.569 92.528 92.786 93.069 93.263 93.091 93.59 93.869 114.76 98.794 91.33 90.841 90.628 91.088 91.9 91.562 92.024 94.497 91.653 109.705 96.985 90.019 89.759 89.925 89.938 89.931 90.374 91.049 92.255 90.477 90.408 90.646 90.761 90.688 91.626 92.054
Felipe Massa 101.714 92.853 93.456 93.503 94.369 94.855 94.635 111.726 99.038 91.976 93.177 91.788 92.367 92.656 93.229 93.616 93.572 93.525 93.628 93.669 93.378 93.133 110.518 97.349 91.415 91.722 92.566 92.841 92.889 93.134 92.672 92.716 92.63 91.918 92.361 109.786 95.79 90.239 90.829 92.515 90.621 90.597 90.808 90.682 90.781 91.124 91.168 91.415 92.363 91.524 91.232 91.769 91.734 91.883 92.033 92.1 92.321 92.894
Fernando Alonso 102.073 93.197 93.225 93.795 94.289 94.791 94.816 94.696 111.303 97.9 92.44 91.883 92.086 92.289 93.297 93.563 93.798 93.283 93.637 111.191 96.171 92.438 92.25 91.92 91.844 92.648 92.122 91.813 92.438 92.231 95.462 92.417 90.836 90.375 90.606 90.674 91.36 91.311 109.336 96.435 89.725 91.184 89.649 90.118 91.494 91.544 91.671 90.839 90.577 90.333 90.41 89.582 89.56 89.876 91.858 91.176 91.205 92.636
Nico Rosberg 104.529 95.421 94.813 95.113 95.819 96.097 95.243 94.227 93.573 93.681 93.651 93.97 94.468 112.098 99.23 93.219 93.388 92.259 92.676 93.109 93.384 93.092 92.774 92.554 92.581 93.03
Kimi Raikkonen 104.043 94.567 93.365 93.488 93.684 94.365 93.91 93.881 112.931 98.498 91.949 92.833 91.877 92.377 92.94 93.126 93.492 93.331 93.423 93.426 92.846 92.939 93.112 91.979 92.49 92.348 92.313 93.17 93.112 95.108 92.089 91.885 92.108 111.259 97.93 91.881 91.675 91.513 91.769 92.062 91.297 90.359 91.544 90.564 90.947 89.872 90.205 90.673 90.792 90.576 90.242 89.915 90.109 90.421 89.737 89.274 89.843 91.761
Romain Grosjean 107.379 95.968 95.413 96.114 116.138 98.525 94.542 93.014 95.558 93.606 93.776 93.924 94.356 94 94.016 94.059 93.926 94.182 112.297 98.012 93.498 93.147 94.088 92.247 93.394 93.867 94.077 93.084 97.136 94.23 92.687 92.539 93.231 93.075 92.833 92.954 111.796 98.012 91.001 90.87 90.395 90.502 90.544 90.581 91.541 91.337 91.967 92.292 91.474 91.175 91.557 91.207 91.069 92.584 95.066 92.023 91.543 92.556
Paul di Resta 105.675 96.063 95.15 95.418 95.654 95.512 95.033 113.21 100.005 93.65 93.491 93.472 93.982 93.584 94.551 94.396 94.437 94.014 93.959 94.103 93.808 94.128 93.553 94.021 93.644 93.413 93.409 93.677 95.132 94.728 94.004 93.769 113.552 99.779 92.314 91.486 91.711 91.859 91.614 91.789 91.449 92.828 92.177 92.344 92.085 91.986 91.737 92.075 92.59 92.039 91.925 91.944 91.86 91.222 91.049 90.894 91.447 93.274
Jenson Button 106.36 95.85 95.294 113.891 99.407 95.131 94.001 94.376 94.474 93.97 94.092 93.675 93.579 93.528 95.563 93.94 93.769 94.39 94.216 113.756 98.536 93.044 93.946 92.497 93.067 94.263 93.215 93.757 96.608 94.699 92.686 92.672 93.416 92.422 93.357 92.835 110.229 97.176 91.259 92.054 90.198 90.49 90.794 90.914 91.789 91.518 91.674 92.044 91.269 91.223 91.519 91.609 91.464 92.303 92.448 92.649 92.936 93.014
Nico Hulkenberg
Adrian Sutil 106.947 96.004 95.054 95.56 94.679 95.572 95.431 94.602 94.059 93.918 93.649 93.511 93.775 93.691 93.438 93.617 93.2 93.513 93.371 93.717 111.569 98.319 93.154 91.334 91.967 92.56 92.929 92.619 92.91 92.978 92.744 92.389 92.589 92.158 92.217 92.358 92.706 92.224 92.299 92.351 91.849 92.005 93.492 92.581 92.57 112.199 98.843 91.412 90.71 92.116 98.455 95.281 93.477 93.49 92.465 92.489 91.554 91.623
Jean-Eric Vergne 109.716 95.703 94.92 95.332 97.289 95.177 95.239 94.921 114.357 101.591 94.154 94.517 93.379 93.485 93.282 92.882 92.854 92.742 92.963 93.057 93.284 93.625 94.115 115.524 99.703 92.39 92.569 92.519 95.327 92.878 92.044 91.935 93.041 93.557 92.47 92.91 93.052 92.22 92.186 91.923 91.547 91.367 92.468 111.475 97.614 90.809 90.412 90.663 90.115 89.498 89.679 91.194 90.965 92.226 97.651 91.245 90.911 92.411
Daniel Ricciardo 112.854 98.762 96.567 96.413 97.63 94.957 94.182 96.885 94.58 94.601 94.623 94.657 94.574 94.935 114.624 101.288 93.461 92.939 92.53 94.041 93.08 94.487 94.721 92.926 93.355 94.018 92.979 93.956 97.1 114.556 99.07 91.33 90.881 91.306 92.212 93.182 92.83 92.68 92.639
Sergio Perez 108.097 95.765 95.448 95.647 95.383 95.401 95.131 94.846 94.962 94.864 96.965 96.922 95.134 94.953 94.735 114.269 98.514 92.924 93.627 94.291 94.519 96.423 113.496 99.762 92.986 92.961 92.572 92.276 94.422 92.564 92.658 92.552 92.824 92.418 92.939 91.933 91.955 91.849 92.602 92 109.951 97.633 90.333 90.146 90.34 89.926 90.562 91.461 90.635 90.462 90.728 90.875 90.12 90.691 92.924 92.23 91.319 92.667
Valtteri Bottas 108.866 95.555 95.712 98.643 97.399 116.816 100.324 93.999 93.693 94.887 94.464 94.851 94.92 95.588 94.47 94.217 94.811 94.224 94.781 94.348 95.013 94.833 99.221 114.787 100.195 92.94 92.6 93.402 97.418 93.14 92.733 92.467 93.523 93.163 93.198 92.831 93.245 93.455 92.858 112.576 100.309 90.652 90.833 93.664 92.141 93.754 93.159 92.561 92.718 91.778 92.216 92.598 91.712 91.296 91.016 91.185 92.01
Pastor Maldonado 110.308 98.456 95.613 95.599 95.623 94.928 95.504 95.323 96.277 117.071 98.454 92.915 94.446 95.517 94.583 94.638 94.969 95.032 94.428 96.4 94.811 96.716 95.222 95.191
Esteban Gutierrez 110.921 95.349 95.028 95.294 116.075 100.573 94.646 95.656 94.289 95.429 94.445 95.162 96.796 94.979 93.856 94.228 93.901 95.586 94.365 94.38 94.143 95.486 94.921 93.74 93.509 95.864 116.188 100.08 99.587 94.764 93.644 91.415 91.812 92.479 93.363 93.464 93.321 94.181 94.901 92.856 92.012 93.899 93.159 93.189 92.531 92.086 92.249 94.766 92.528 94.065 93.152 93.118 94.126 92.718 92.662 92.895 92.486
Jules Bianchi 111.287 97.074 95.743 97.206 96.184 96.622 96.654 98.916 116.625 101.384 94.875 94.265 94.075 93.811 94.091 94.809 95.081 95.134 94.857 95.357 95.394 95.481 95.789 95.567 96.847 96.935 115.812 102.025 97.83 97.448 93.548 95.152 93.463 93.005 92.938 92.596 92.727 93.715 96.761 97.297 93.296 93.361 92.854 92.668 92.552 92.899 93.589 97.754 93.378 113.418 99.538 90.454 91.156 92.716 91.865 93.396 102.021
Max Chilton 112.024 98.584 96.363 97.069 101.33 132.441 102.421 94.495 94.664 94.697 94.891 94.759 94.956 95.846 96.304 96.732 96.013 96.645 124.141 101.822 95.088 94.46 95.857 94.695 95.21 95.565 96.984 100.196 96.208 94.965 95.451 99.28 96.915 116.87 100.942 94.638 93.447 93.198 92.646 92.781 92.349 93.042 94.642 93.711 95.267 94.949 95.045 93.279 92.21 92.774 92.952 94.828 92.823 93.102 95.687 95
Giedo van der Garde 112.131 97.37 96.27 97.685 101.434 99.753 121.892 102.388 95.293 95.05 95.312 95.552 96.497 96.586 96.81 116.684 102.517 95.167 95.277 96.895 95.153 99.793 97.038 95.404 96.753 95.656 97.448 98.962 96.485 95.435 95.394 95.443 98.281 117.167 100.703 93.494 96.094 93.281 92.636 93.089 93.025 93.258 94.706 93.847 95.082 95.079 96.596 96.554 96.192 95.289 98.364 95.383 95.558 97.029 96.784 96.861
Charles Pic 113.116 98.024 96.487 96.943 101.382 100.033 100.56 118.807 101.017 94.514 94.372 95.069 94.341 94.877 94.993 95.047 95.631 95.993 95.683 96.026 95.857 95.318 95.688 95.431 96.423 95.795 97.165 96.987 97.472 96.329 97.19 101.064 116.961 99.89 96.668 93.195 94.208 94.655 93.017 92.997 93.169 93.312 93.596 95.597 94.986 93.756 98.157 93.761 93.513 93.488 93.355 94.076 94.164 93.744 92.261 92.734

Australian Grand Prix fastest laps

Each driver’s fastest lap:

Rank Driver Car Fastest lap Gap On lap
1 Kimi Raikkonen Lotus-Renault 1’29.274 56
2 Jean-Eric Vergne Toro Rosso-Ferrari 1’29.498 0.224 50
3 Fernando Alonso Ferrari 1’29.560 0.286 53
4 Mark Webber Red Bull-Renault 1’29.732 0.458 45
5 Lewis Hamilton Mercedes 1’29.759 0.485 45
6 Sergio Perez McLaren 1’29.926 0.652 46
7 Jenson Button McLaren 1’30.198 0.924 41
8 Felipe Massa Ferrari 1’30.239 0.965 38
9 Romain Grosjean Lotus-Renault 1’30.395 1.121 41
10 Sebastian Vettel Red Bull-Renault 1’30.409 1.135 42
11 Jules Bianchi Marussia-Cosworth 1’30.454 1.180 52
12 Valtteri Bottas Williams-Renault 1’30.652 1.378 42
13 Adrian Sutil Force India-Mercedes 1’30.710 1.436 49
14 Daniel Ricciardo Toro Rosso-Ferrari 1’30.881 1.607 33
15 Paul di Resta Force India-Mercedes 1’30.894 1.620 56
16 Esteban Gutierrez Sauber-Ferrari 1’31.415 2.141 32
17 Max Chilton Marussia-Cosworth 1’32.210 2.936 49
18 Nico Rosberg Mercedes 1’32.259 2.985 18
19 Charles Pic Caterham-Renault 1’32.261 2.987 55
20 Giedo van der Garde Caterham-Renault 1’32.636 3.362 39
21 Pastor Maldonado Williams-Renault 1’32.915 3.641 12
22 Nico Hulkenberg Sauber-Ferrari

2013 Australian Grand Prix

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51 comments on 2013 Australian Grand Prix lap times and fastest laps

  1. Fer no.65 (@fer-no65) said on 17th March 2013, 15:21

    Surprisingly Jules Bianchi set the 11th-fastest lap of the race in the Marussia, while using super-soft tyres in his final stint – quicker than Adrian Sutil could manage on the same tyres in his Force India.

    Sometimes you really feel F1 is broken or there’s a bug with Pirellis. I mean, Sutil was pulling away from Vettel/Massa/Alonso on worn tyres. And Kimi set fastest lap 2 laps from the end. And Bianchi manages to lap quicker than Sutil on the same tyres, around the same time of the race.

    It’s a big mind**** sometimes ! xD

  2. andae23 (@andae23) said on 17th March 2013, 15:26

    Incredible that Raikkonen was able to match Vettel’s, Alonso’s and Massa’s time without making a third stop. There is also an interesting distance between Raikkonen first and second stint on the mediums: at the beginning of that first stint he was going very fast and eased off later on – but still he was able to produce some good lap times even with old tires. His second stint was way more consistent, probably how you would want it to be, again with the fastest laps near the end of the stint. That final stint is probably what won him the race: pretty much everyone (notably Massa) began the stints on the mediums with quick lap times and settled with slower laps near the end. Taking it easy at the beginning of the stint is what keeps the tires alive – Raikkonen gave a masterclass of how to use the tires properly today.

    • andae23 (@andae23) said on 17th March 2013, 15:28

      distance = difference
      how did I manage to do that?

    • Fernando Cruz said on 17th March 2013, 16:54

      “Incredible that Raikkonen was able to match Vettel’s, Alonso’s and Massa’s time without making a third stop.”

      Vettel, Alonso and Massa lost time behind Sutil at some point of the race and that possibly helped Raikkonen…

      • andae23 (@andae23) said on 17th March 2013, 17:35

        Vettel was running right on Sutil’s gearbox, but then Sutil started to open up a gap to Vettel within six laps. So I don’t think they were held up by Sutil, nor does it explain the massive amount of time Raikkonen somehow found.

        • robfff said on 17th March 2013, 17:58

          By then the damage was done to the three-stoppers strategy’s. When they would have normally been able to stretch out a good lead, they were stuck behind Sutil. So when Vettel’s tyres dropped off, he then became the train which held up Alonso. Kimi and Alonso were only a few seconds apart when Alonso came out from his final stop. Without being held up, I’m sure he would have at least had track position coming out of the pits.

          • Theoddkiwi (@theoddkiwi) said on 17th March 2013, 21:08

            Here’s a hot tip. It’s called motor racing, we’re if one comes across another car in front of one must use skill and speed to pass that car. If one cannot get past that car the other car is NOT obliged to move out of the way and indicates your skill and speed is insufficient and you do not deserve to get past. Saying the Sutil ruined vet tells race is wrong and shows a complete misunderstanding of what racing actually means.

          • Mike (@mike) said on 19th March 2013, 2:46

            @theoddkiwi They are talking about why the 3 stop strategies didn’t work. Partly because they were stuck behind Sutil while their tyres were good.

            No one said anything about Sutil being at fault.

  3. Bianchi the 11th fastest lap of the race. Only half a tenth slower than Vettel. Now that is impressive!

    • andae23 (@andae23) said on 17th March 2013, 15:35

      Not as impressive as it sounds I guess: Vettel was saving his mediums at the time he was setting his fastest lap. Bianchi only had to do 6 laps on the supersoft tyres, so he was able to push. Combine that with a clear track on his first flyer and the result is a lap that probably looks more impressive than it actually is. Anyway, Bianchi’s lap times soon tumbled.

    • Mark Salisbury said on 18th March 2013, 12:42

      Bianchi’s times were impressive. Absolutely no doubt about it.

  4. Adam86 said on 17th March 2013, 15:45

    Comparing Hamilton to Vettel does show it was the length of first stint, and then attempt to fight Alonso which created most of the gap, rather than a general very weak race pace.

  5. Red Bull may very well hold a clear advantage in qualifying but if that doesn’t translate into good race pace and the management they are just going to fall back. Malaysia will give a clearer picture though and Australia seemed pretty inconclusive, excerpt from the fact Massa is definitely back on form.

    • robfff said on 17th March 2013, 18:02

      Yeah. Good to see he is back on form. He just needs the confidence to take advantage of opportunities and he will be able to compete with Alonso. He really lost out to his team mate because he made a poor call… thinking he could go a lot faster once in clean air, which never become reality.

      • Hopefully that’s just purely a bad luck decision and he’ll maintain it, because it’s never good to see a driver get so convincingly thrashed by their teammate. Massa was the worst of anyone for that last year. If he does maintain that though, I’d stick my neck out and say Ferrari have the best driver line-up…

      • panache (@panache) said on 17th March 2013, 21:25

        Ferrari intentionally sabotaged Massa. I don’t think it was Massa making a poor call. The teams have a huge amount of telemetry data on the cars, they are not in the dark by any stretch of the imagination.

        They KNEW that allowing Alonso to undercut Massa would compromise Massa’s race. It was blatantly obvious that Massa’s tyres would not last or allow him to lap quicker than his teammate who undercut him to pit for fresh tyres.

        The option to undercut a teammate when both are on essentially the same strategy and competing for the same position on track is usually advantageous, so if Massa was actually in a fair race with his teammate, Smedley or someone else should have informed Massa and allowed him the opportunity to pit first. That is of course unless Alonso used some dirty tactics and only announced his intention to pit as he was approaching the pit lane entry.

        • Eggry (@eggry) said on 17th March 2013, 22:37

          I don’t think Massa made a poor call. It’s more about the Alonso’s risky call. Massa’s strategy was quite typical and logical but it didn’t offer any advantage over Vettel while Alonso’s was quite risky but it paid off. That’s it.

        • Brace (@brace) said on 18th March 2013, 4:15

          If Ferrari or any other team are such experts in predicting when the tires will start to go off, why couldn’t Ferrari predict accurately for how long Alonso’s tires would last in Canada last year, since they already had bunch of races to get their info from?

          To suggest that they knew how much life Massa had in his tires in the first race of the season on new Pirellis is just your attempt to find an excuse where there is non.

          Alonso’s side simply decided to try to undercut the rivals, just like Maldonado did to Alonso in Barcelona last year. If Massa was to be sacrificed for Alonso, he would have pitted the very next lap, but that didn’t happen. They wanted to try to do a two-stop race, and that was perfectly sensible, since Ferrari was very good with its tires. Kimi made it work, so obviously Ferrari weren’t just making stupid unguided decision. It didn’t pay off for Massa this time, but it might pay off some other time.

          The one very positive thing I take from this race is that both Ferraris had ran in formation, in full speed at the front of the field and they obviously had more speed in pocket (since they managed to actually be slowed down behind Red Bull), which is a great news for me, as long as they maintain their advantage at the more standard race tracks and more common temperatures.

  6. i thought alonso jumped vettel and massa on the second stop. By quick thinking and stopping abit early.

  7. Paul2013 said on 17th March 2013, 16:24

    Today lotus should learn from the horrible performance of Romain G.

  8. AdrianMorse (@adrianmorse) said on 17th March 2013, 16:27

    A few things I noticed:

    Hamilton’s third stint was a disaster. He had to come in again after little more than 10 laps, and he was slower than Alonso whose tyres had done 10 laps more. His first stint, by contrast, was fantastic. He didn’t actually lose that much time since being passed by Raikkonen, and he could do 7 more laps than Vettel, with his lap times getting consistently faster towards the end of the stint. I expected this to bring him a useful advantage later in the race, either in terms of doing one stop less or by going faster in the following stints (or simply by being able to go quicker at the end of a stint), but he just couldn’t get the mediums to work, it seemed.

    There had been some talk of Massa being disadvantaged by Ferrari’s strategy, but I doubt he would have been able to challenge Vettel. He couldn’t produce the kinds of stints Alonso was doing, and in the last stint his tyres seemed to be going off quite badly. I was pleased he didn’t let Alonso through in the early laps, though. There was an onboard shot of Alonso getting alonside Massa on the back straight, and the commentators at RTL were like “Ok, Alonso is being let through now” – and the director seemed to think so as well because some other cars were shown before the pass was completed – but the next time they came into view Massa was still ahead.

    Vergne drove a strong race, and with the usual Melbourne attrition he would have gotten some points. Bianchi’s fastest lap is a little flattered as it was on super softs with low fuel, and he didn’t seem to make any attempt to conserve his tyres, but the rest of his race was pretty solid.

    Finally, an honourable mention to DiResta. A lot of people seem ready to write him off, but he’s actually performed pretty strongly this weekend. He outqualified his team mate, and drove two pretty consistent stints. Sutil got all the credit this weekend for his (admittedly superb) drive at the front, but without intervention from the team Paul might have finished ahead of him.

    • XR650 said on 17th March 2013, 19:17

      Di Resta deserves no praise. He was lucky to outqualify sutil. Sutil would have been miles ahead if the team bought him in for the supersofts in the last few laps. Di Resta shouldn’t have whined and felt p7 was stolen from him, he’s acting really arogant and has never shown any real potential in F1

      • mhop (@mhop) said on 17th March 2013, 23:54

        “Sutil would have been miles ahead if the team bought him in for supersofts in the last few laps”. Yeah and if they’d given him a magic carpet he would have won the race at a canter.

        Listen, Sutil had to pit! He’d done 25 laps on his mediums and they were finished.

    • Theoddkiwi (@theoddkiwi) said on 17th March 2013, 21:26

      Not so sure about your analysis of Hamiltons third stint. I believe he had tha gap to webber to do the stop without loosing position. His laps on the last stint where as good as anyone’s.

      Mercs first stint on the super softs was amazing 4 and 5 more laps on heavy fuel than anyone else. Button did three laps and pitted. Oh dear.

      • AdrianMorse (@adrianmorse) said on 18th March 2013, 5:52

        @mike, that’s a possible explanation of why he came in so early, but then I would still have expected one or two quick laps before the stop, in case there was life left in the tyres, but that didn’t appear to be the case.

    • Mr draw said on 17th March 2013, 22:37

      “John-Errick Virn” was very quick in qualifying and race, but unfortunately he couldn’t convert this speed into decent results. In the qualifying he gambled and lost, but what did hold him back in the race? Traffic?

    • Mike (@mike) said on 18th March 2013, 3:27

      @adrianmorse

      Was that when Lewis locked up though?

  9. nickfrog (@nickfrog) said on 17th March 2013, 16:33

    JEV did a good solid job indeed.

  10. petebaldwin (@petebaldwin) said on 17th March 2013, 17:23

    So overall, it’s Ferrari, Red Bull and Lotus who are quick out of the box although the Red Bull chews it tyres up more quickly than the rest.

    Mercedes are next followed by Force India. Then you’ve got McLaren who will surely move forward in the next few races and then you’ve got the rest….

    • Ben (@scuderia29) said on 17th March 2013, 17:28

      potentially it could be quite a different running order in malaysia, melbourne is an unusual temporary track and very different layout to malaysia, also the weather could be very different in malaysia, i think only after the malaysian grand prix can we really say where everyone is in terms of pace

  11. dominion said on 17th March 2013, 18:03

    Jenson did a 1.29.1 last year. Why don’t Clare go back to last years car?

  12. Harry Westwood (@sirspuddington) said on 17th March 2013, 18:06

    don’t forget, last season we saw a lot of cars being strong at some circuits and weak at others, or being sensitive to what temperature they’re operating at. There are so many contributing factors, that it may still be a few races before we find out who’s car can do well in more than one climate at more than one to five tracks. For all we know, this new mclaren could just be anti-street circuit. Who knows? No-one. The only thing we do know is that pirelli should have taken softs and mediums, because the SS tyres just fell apart too quickly. I mean, after little over 10 laps lewis’ tyres (SS) were worn down the the canvas. NOT MEANT TO HAPPEN

    • Jake (@jleigh) said on 17th March 2013, 18:23

      Well Hamilton did 2 flying laps in quali, and an ever faster stint of 13 laps on full fuel. I would say that’s not bad. The Mediums were more of a trouble for him than the SS.

  13. mantresx (@mantresx) said on 17th March 2013, 18:11

    How many fastest laps does Kimi have now? I think he’s the closest to Schumacher’s record.

  14. Tomsk (@tomsk) said on 17th March 2013, 18:15

    A classic waiting game by Raikkonen – it reminded me of Prost and Lauda in the McLarens, sitting back early on and not working the car too hard. He wasn’t all over the back of the guy in front (whereas Alonso was typically menacing at times), and on his first stop Kimi looked like he could have carried on, but was just covering Alonso’s stop (like Massa didn’t).

    Looking forward to seeing how the new combination of Raikkonen and Ciaran Pilbeam develops. I’ve no idea how much credit the race engineer deserves – after all, Kimi seems well able to make his own strategy calls. But if they can improve on last year’s missed opportunities, they’ll be dangerous.

    • Kimi4WDC said on 17th March 2013, 23:04

      This, thanks mate.

      Kimi’s on demand sector times were pleasure to watch while others were grinding each other down.

  15. Palle (@palle) said on 17th March 2013, 21:01

    Kimi was very impressive today, but Alonso also. The undercut on Vettel was brilliant and Vettel seemed to realize that he couldn’t strike back. Massa was a very good team mate for Alonso today, whereas Webber and Grosjean didn’t have a memorable day. Ferrari and Kimi seems very dangerous to Vettel this year, but the temperatures and conditions overall were special – As Alonso said lets see when we get to Europe. If Massa is really back on form for this season, he will take important points away from Alonso’s competitors. Webber needs to forget this race and move on. McLaren – hmm, they’ll be back I’m sure, but loosing Hamilton they don’t have a stable driver showing them the cars present state over the season. Button has his off-races and Sergio has his On-races, but none of them can be used to perfectly gauge if the car has improved or not. I don’t believe Mercedes has improved over last year, but lets see next race.

    • Murali Dharan said on 17th March 2013, 22:08

      + 1
      McLaren need a good driver who can quickly setup his car. Now they are lost.

      • Nick (@nick101) said on 18th March 2013, 11:23

        Yeah, I guess you are right. I mean, after all, Button only finished higher in the race than he started.

        Unlike Hamilton, the driving and setup God, who managed to lose 2 places during the race.

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