Two detection points for DRS zones at Sepang

2013 Malaysian Grand Prix

Vitaly Petrov, Timo Glock, Sepang, 2012The Sepang circuit will feature two DRS zones for the first time this year and each will have its own detection point, the FIA has confirmed.

A single DRS zone on the start/finish straight has been used for the last two Malaysian Grands Prix. For this year a second DRS zone has been added on the straight which leads to the last corner.

Each DRS zone will have its own detection point, unlike in Melbourne last week where a single detection point served as the trigger for both zones.

The new DRS zone will have its detection point in the middle of the high-speed turns 12 and 13. Drivers will be able to activate DRS 104 metres after the penultimate corner.

The configuration of the other DRS zone has been changed. The detection point was previously 207 metres before the final corner, but for this year it is in the corner itself, positioned 16 metres after the apex. The activation point has been moved back 23 metres from where it was last year.

The new configuration raises the possibility of one driver passing another using DRS on the back straight, then coming under attack from DRS themselves on the pit straight.

Sepang DRS zones, 2013 Malaysian Grand Prix

Every track on the calendar bar Monaco and Suzuka will have two DRS zones this year, as drivers are no longer have free use of DRS in practice and qualifying.

2013 Malaysian Grand Prix

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97 comments on Two detection points for DRS zones at Sepang

  1. My fav track with 2 DRS zones, I’m recording this race in HD. :D

  2. kbdavies (@kbdavies) said on 20th March 2013, 15:06

    This will favour the Bulls massively – or any other car with loads of downforce. The ability to stay close to the car in front in any of the corners will put you well within 1sec for DRS activation. Subsequently, you will also be ahead come the next DRS activation zone and be able to break away from the 1sec activation.

    • hobo (@hobo) said on 20th March 2013, 15:55

      As long as they gear their cars long enough to take advantage, this could be true. Also depends on how they are on tyres in heat/rain. ROS looked good in the rain last weekend.

  3. Peter_GH said on 20th March 2013, 17:11

    So i’ll be getting a good nights sleep Sunday morning because Im not getting up to watch a boring DRS fest.

    DRS is a joke & im no longer interested in watching it kill f1, kill real overtaking & totally butcher the racing I once used to love.

    With 2 zones at most tracks & in locations such as here, Were just going to see more boring DRS passes & less real & exciting overtaking!!!!!

  4. StefMeister (@stefmeister) said on 20th March 2013, 17:27

    Never been & never will be a fan of DRS, I personally loathe the stupid thing & hate what its done to the racing & its really starting to harm my enjoyment of F1.

    Regarding the 2 zones, I think its a really bad move for the simple reason that its going to end up reducing the number of Non-DRS overtakes which are always more exciting to watch than what DRS produces.

    Also the placement of the zones, People keep saying that they should be used strategically, Don’t pass in the 1st if you know your going to get re-passed in the 2nd.
    So do we really want to see drivers backing out of overtakes in the final corner (As we see at the Montreal hairpin now)?
    Is that really the sort of racing thats fun or exciting to watch?
    From my point of view the answer to both is a profound NO!

    “If you no longer go for a gap that exists, Your no longer A Racing Driver” – Ayrton Senna!

  5. The new configuration raises the possibility of one driver passing another using DRS on the back straight, then coming under attack from DRS themselves on the pit straight.

    Canada all over again…. Ridiculous decision to have 2 detection zones.

  6. Francorchamps (@francorchamps17) said on 20th March 2013, 20:32

    @keithcollantine Where do you find these track maps with Marshall sectors?

  7. JackySteeg (@jackysteeg) said on 20th March 2013, 21:01

    Well, this is better than if they’d only had one detection point for both straights.

    At the very least it means a defending driver will have his chance to repass the car in front immediately…

    I appreciate nobody seems to approve of 2 DRS zones, but I’d still rather see too much overtaking than too little.

    • Roger2012 said on 20th March 2013, 21:39

      At the very least it means a defending driver will have his chance to repass the car in front immediately…

      which would be ridiculously artificial & a complete joke just as it was at Abu Dhabi in 2011.

      but I’d still rather see too much overtaking than too little.

      even if the passing is way too easy & therefore totally devoid of any excitement (as most drs passes are)?

      i would much rather a race with fewer overtakes which are actually exciting to watch than a race with tons of passing thats all boring to watch!

  8. Shiki said on 20th March 2013, 21:52

    you know what the biggest crime of the drs system is? the fact that its taken away the art of overtaking.

    in the past drivers like senna, hamilton, montoya & kobayashi stood out because they could overtake, they would throw a late braking move at someone & manage to pull off some truly brilliant overtakes that made you sit back & think ‘wow’.

    now with the drs everyone can overtake & you see those drivers like hamilton who once stood out for there great overtaking stand out less because overtaking is much easier than it should be now as you just have to get into the zone, push a button & your past with little trouble.

    were also losing the art of defending, yes it can be frustrating watching a car stuck behind another with no way past, however been able to place your car to prevent the one behind from passing you is a skill & something all the great drivers did well & often & it helped win them races & championships.

    with 2 drs zones most places this year i fear that passing is only going to get easier & defending harder & this will only strip away the art od overtaking & defending even further & we may no longer get to see the greats show exactly why there great.

  9. Car A goes after car B just within the second so goes on DRS zone 1 and overtakes it… then car B is behind and just within the second of car A, takes the DRS zone 2,
    This scenario is possible and the 2 DRS zones can be worthless

  10. mead said on 24th March 2013, 9:26

    I’ll tell ya what you do. You let the guy behind you pass just before the turn to the DRS zone. Then pass him back. You will lead him every lap. Or better yet, just get rid of it.

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