Vettel apologises to Webber for ‘win I’m not proud of’

2013 Malaysian Grand Prix

Sebastian Vettel, Red Bull, Sepang, 2013Sebastian Vettel apologised to team mate Mark Webber after ignoring a team order not to overtake him during the Malaysian Grand Prix.

Vettel passed Webber in the final stint of the race despite having been told to hold position.

“I owe an explanation to Mark and the team, and that’s it,” said Vettel after the race. “Everyone else has the right to their own opinions.”

“For sure it’s not a victory I’m very proud of because it should have been Mark’s.”

“I think it has to be said that we respect each other and there’s nothing that has to be, in that regard, has to be fixed,” he added. “Obviously I owe him a proper explanation, I tried to give it in front of everyone and I will try again just face to face.

“The situation is as it is now but I think we don’t hate each other so I don’t think that’s anything to worry about for going into the next couple of races.”

Vettel indicated he did not realise what the consequences of his move would be: “I messed up today and I apologise for that but right now I want to say the truth.”

“I wasn’t aware of it otherwise I wouldn’t take that much risk to pass someone I’m not supposed to pass at that moment. But just before we got out on the podium I had a very quick word and it was quite a shock and not easy for me to admit but that’s the truth so I want to stick to the truth.”

Webber did not hide his displeasure with the outcome of the race, saying: “I was completely reassured twice that we were not going to abuse the cars on each other because it was very easy for us not to get any points for the whole team”.

“But it’s very hard for everybody to understand the whole scenario,” he explained. “There’s a lot of people that think they know the whole situation but unfortunately it’s not possible for them to understaned everything.”

Webber said the situation “puts a lot of heat on certain people” within the team. “Unfortunately there’s no rewind button now so the scenario is a bit more challenging for certain people.”

“It’s three weeks to the next race, we’re fortunate we have three weeks. I’ll catch some waves in Australia on my board and I think this will be good medicine for me. I had a lot of thoughts going through my mind in the last 15 laps of the Grand Prix so whether the medicine is enough, we’ll see.”

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574 comments on Vettel apologises to Webber for ‘win I’m not proud of’

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  1. tmax (@tmax) said on 25th March 2013, 0:16

    All these things Begs One question to be answered . WHY does team principals think that if team mates race each other they will inevitably end up crashing ? On the other hand if they are racing against the other 20 drivers the principals think it is perfectly safe.

    • Journeyer (@journeyer) said on 25th March 2013, 7:33

      @tmax If they take themselves out against a different team’s car, they only lose the one car. But if the two teammates take each other out, that’s double the pain and double the loss.

      Remember, as a constructor, one teammate passing another gains the team a massive ZERO points. They have nothing to gain from it, but a whole lot to lose.

      • tmax (@tmax) said on 25th March 2013, 15:33

        I agree to that But the reaction seems to be much more than just the points it seems they predict a 90% possibility of a crash. I mean common that can happen while passing any other car too. The risk is ALMOST equal when the 2 drivers are making an overtaking move on 2 different sections of the track on 2 different drivers. I mean this is racing we are not taking about procession. What is the fun in racing if 2 people do not try to prove that they are better than the other with equal equipment.

  2. Jono (@me262) said on 25th March 2013, 2:34

    whoever justifies what vettel did is profusely ignorant. The characteristics of the pirelli tyres further exacerbates the need for the teams to manage their drivers so as to not jeopardize the result in the latter stages of a race. Most of the time Vettel has been the beneficiary of this but this time it should have been Webbers time to shine. I can’t say ive lost any respect for Vettel as I didnt have any to begin with…with alonso out of the race he was in with a good haul of points anyway. Hopefully webber gets a chance to steal some points from him during the season and Vettel loses the championship by a point :)

    • I Love the Pope said on 25th March 2013, 2:58

      Mark did it, and admitted that he defied team orders not to, at Silverstone in 2011.

      The only difference is that he was not good enough to get past Seb.

      But I suppose if MARK does it – the EXACT SAME THING – its okay.

    • David-A (@david-a) said on 25th March 2013, 10:39

      The characteristics of the pirelli tyres further exacerbates the need for the teams to manage their drivers so as to not jeopardize the result in the latter stages of a race.

      Red Bull were not in jeopardy from the Mercedes after Vettel got back ahead of Hamilton.

    • Mads (@mads) said on 26th March 2013, 14:25

      @me262

      The characteristics of the pirelli tyres further exacerbates the need for the teams to manage their drivers so as to not jeopardize the result in the latter stages of a race

      As if the drivers aren’t capable of managing their tyres….
      They can do so at every other race in the year. The tyres aren’t going to jump off the car just because they are fighting their team mate a bit.
      It’s perfectly safe, the teams are just being babies about it.

      • Jono (@me262) said on 26th March 2013, 20:52

        @mads well ofcourse they are their just not capable of doing things for the better of the team..drivers only be able to manage their own tyres and thats it

        • Mads (@mads) said on 26th March 2013, 21:22

          @me262
          That is all they need to. Both webber and vettel can manage their tyres perfectly well. So it is quite frankly ridiculous that the team does not trust that they can race and get their cars to the end. Of course they can. otherwise they wouldn’t be there.

          • Jono (@me262) said on 26th March 2013, 21:32

            ridiculous that the team does not trust that they can race and get their cars to the end

            @mads ofcourse they can but the over all risk management always falls on the team, always has in Formula 1. Teams have 2 cars to manage. Vettel chose to be bigger than the team, would be awesome to have Vettel come in for a stop and for his team to remain stationary for 10 seconds :) enough for victory to pass on to webber. maybe then he’d learn a little about respecting the people around him that make all these champuionships possible for him (but wouldnt marko be furious)

          • Mads (@mads) said on 27th March 2013, 19:46

            @me262
            I don’t think it does.
            The drivers know how to manage risks. Its what they have done for 20 years. Both of them.
            The guys on the pitwall are stressed and afraid of the disaster, but the way I see it is this.
            It is better to have a well functioning team with two happy drivers and take the risks that goes with that, then a team lacking trust in each other or even completely demotivating one of the drivers like what happened with Massa, or like what is happening between Vettel and Webber, turning a competetive team mate relationship into a grudge match.

          • Jono (@me262) said on 27th March 2013, 21:33

            The drivers know how to manage risks. Its what they have done for 20 years. Both of them

            @mads They have been managing their own tyres/risks for 20 years, yes and Turkey 2010 still happened. Thats why the guys on the pitwall start sweating when their cars are 1-2 and the leading driver starts moving over on the other to try and squeeze his team mate out whilst trying to overtake down pit straight..The team stick up for the team Interests ‘Nico I want to bring the 2 cars home’…some drivers obviously do the team things better than others

            Regarding the rest of your post I agree!

  3. F1Yankee (@f1yankee) said on 25th March 2013, 3:54

    It’s three weeks to the next race, we’re fortunate we have three weeks. I’ll catch some waves in Australia on my board and I think this will be good medicine for me. I had a lot of thoughts going through my mind in the last 15 laps of the Grand Prix so whether the medicine is enough, we’ll see.

    i would have thought webbo’s had enough swimming with sharks for now…

  4. Alzarius (@alzarius) said on 25th March 2013, 4:21

    For those saying “why didn’t Mark turn his engine back up to get back at Seb”…. that would be the wrong thing to do. Mark has learned to play by the rules. Him getting back at Seb would be him disobeying team orders. Seb already showed his insubordination. Mark was not going to do that because 2 wrongs do not make it right. If he turned up his engine after lap 43 and pushed more, maybe it would allow the Mercs back into the picture. That would be even worse than what we have right now.

    I have a feeling this spectacle is probably the worst out of all the ones we’ve seen between Mark and Seb. This is the first time we’ve heard of the team’s displeasure with Seb over open radio “Seb this is silly” and “You’ve got some explaining to do”. As displeased as Mark was with Seb, Red Bull is probably 100x more displeased and furious with Seb. This is a first. And it will not go down well. There will be repercussions for sure.

    • tmax (@tmax) said on 25th March 2013, 15:38

      @alzarius I too said that.

      Mark has learned to play by the rule

      Oh Yeah we saw that happening in Brazil 2012 2 races ago when Vettel was racing for the WDC. Horner said that too. It goes the same distance both ways.

  5. The Limit said on 25th March 2013, 5:47

    Everybody has mentioned Christian Horner, but few have mentioned Helmut Marko. Marko has alot of influence at Red Bull and was the man behind the rise of Sebastien Vettel. This latest dilemma will be quickly forgotten by the likes of Marko, Vettel, and possibly Horner. It won’t be forgotten so easily by the fans or Mark Webber.
    At face value I have my suspicions about Red Bull motives for ordering Webber to ‘turn his engine down’ so early. Was it to protect Mark’s car as the likes of Horner claim or was it to slow Webber down so as to aid Vettel? Horner could hardly come over the radio and suggest that ‘Mark, Sebastien is faster than you!’ Thats already been done before. Were Red Bull trying to subtly induce team orders so that Vettel could win the grands prix? Earlier in the race Vettel had complained about Webber’s lack of pace over the radio, despite the fact that Mark was lapping quicker than the German. Horner’s response to Vettel was to ‘be patient’. I am assuming that Vettel’s patience wore out as the grands prix progressed.
    As its turned out, Red Bull achieved a one two finish, Vettel won the race, team orders were implemented and Vettel takes the can for ‘disobeying’ the team’s wishes. As I said, I am suspicious of Red Bull’s motives and believe more went on behind the scenes than we saw or know about. Webber alluded to this in the interview by saying that Vettel will have ‘the usual protection’. Strange choice of words. The fact remains though that this scenario is an old one. Three years ago we had the events in Turkey that cost Red Bull dearly, then there was the front wing saga at Silverstone and Webber’s ‘number two’ comments. The bare bones are that these two drivers do not like one another, and I am sure that if Webber has the opportunity for revenge on Vettel, he will take it.
    Last year, when Sebastien was fighting Fernando Alonso for the title, Webber was asked if he would help the German if asked in his quest for a third championship. The answer was a firm no, and a ‘I have my own races to win’ comment. I seriously doubt that this stance from Webber will change anytime soon. More to the point, why should it?

  6. Joe Papp (@joepa) said on 25th March 2013, 6:05

    Vettel is no longer worthy of my admiration as a fan.

  7. marcoduf (@marcoduf) said on 25th March 2013, 10:46

    A lot comes down to attitude however – if SV had been unabashedly doing it and said “I’m the world champion and I will go out and get the win”, and “team rules do not apply because I run for the title”, then the statement would have been clear – and his victory a statement. Instead, he seems ashamed of his win, knows he abused the team’s trust, doesn’t even say a word after crossing the line… and seems to be unreliable instead.

  8. Nuno Moreira said on 25th March 2013, 11:34

    This weekend Vettel became the new Schumacher… His transformation is now complete…. To win at any cost he will just randomly start to do little “mistakes”…

    I am sure that, like Ferrari in the Schumacher era, Red Bull will protect their number one driver.

    Just hope Webber in the near future does a “Vettel” to “Vettel”…

  9. Sergey Petrov said on 25th March 2013, 12:46

    Can we pretty please get over Mark’s turned down engine? He set the fastest sector of anybody defending fron Vettel on lap 45. Right or wrong is a matter of opinion, but lets get yhe facts straight.

  10. jordi said on 25th March 2013, 14:18

    Nevertheless We all have to agree that the overtake was breathtaking, Webber fought hard to defend his position but Vettel prevailed.

  11. kimberly said on 25th March 2013, 16:43

    i watched the race again and webber knew that vettel was coming for him 1 lap before, after going out from the pits. applaud vettel for what he did, all the greats were ruthless and cheats and had the win at all costs mentality, and THATS WHAT MADE THEM GREAT. what bothered me was that he gave a halfhearted, halfbaked, hypocritical apology. should have stood up for it

    • Joe Papp (@joepa) said on 25th March 2013, 18:21

      applaud vettel for what he did, all the greats were ruthless and cheats and had the win at all costs mentality, and THATS WHAT MADE THEM GREAT.

      Ahhh, no. If that’s the mentality you embrace – lying, cheating, insubordination – then you should really be upset with your parents for raising a degenerate.

      • javlinsharp (@javlinsharp) said on 26th March 2013, 14:35

        @joepa
        The days of “gentelmen racing” is looong gone.

        Do we chastize a team when they do something outside the rules? Do we call them unfair?

        I feel your comments are a bit of a stretch, and the personal attack is both trollish and uncalled for. @kimberly did not equate the dirty tricks to acceptable behavior in LIFE, but rather, that F1 is a pinacle, not a happy-joy club where everyone is equal and deserves to win.

        There are the Rules, the Stewards, and the Poduim and the winner is there because HE TOOK IT from the others. The instant F1 reduces the ruthlessness nature for a kinder and gentler world is the same instant that they fail to deserve the title of Greatest Motorsport.

        Lets all be honest, the 3 guys on the podium this Sunday WERE NOT the best drivers on earth for that day.

        • Joe Papp (@joepa) said on 26th March 2013, 22:35

          @javlinsharp

          @kimberly did not equate the dirty tricks to acceptable behavior in LIFE…

          I disagree, for at the highest level, sport is life, and so to celebrate qualities such as lying, cheating and insubordination is not to celebrate or honor greatness, but is, rather, to worship degeneracy. Winning without honor is not winning at all – it is self-degradation.

          Whether you are a lawyer, police officer, fire fighter, doctor, businessperson, athlete, or any of numerous other professions, you compete against either other people or natural forces. But there is a right way and a wrong way to compete. Avoid anger and greed. Use concentration and awareness.

          I accept, however, that your view may differ from mine. I’m not sure what @keithcollantine‘s view is.

  12. javlinsharp (@javlinsharp) said on 26th March 2013, 14:19

    So, this is what F1 has become…
    1. Driver apologizing on the podium
    2. Teams ordering the restriction of speed
    3. Drivers keeping to a laptime even when the car has more
    4. The medium tire LASTS LONGER than the harder compound.
    5. Driver passes ostensibly limited to pedestrian affairs in the DRS zone with a huge helping of KERS.

    I mark the 2013 Malaysia GP as the first step to me falling out of love with F1. You wanted to improve the show? Now you can watch your fanbase head for the exits…

    • Joe Papp (@joepa) said on 26th March 2013, 22:49

      Oh please. So sorry that F1 has so disappointed you. But like you said, it’s a free world so thankfully you can spend your entertainment dollars elsewhere while the rest of us enjoy the Show!

  13. Nuno Moreira said on 27th March 2013, 12:14

    New sticker on Vettel’s car… LOL
    http://www.365.co.za/images/images_offonf1/VetCar3.jpg

  14. Nuno Moreira said on 27th March 2013, 12:34

    New sticker on Vettel’s car… LOL

    [IMG]http://www.365.co.za/images/images_offonf1/VetCar3.jpg[/IMG]

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