Soft tyre’s short life poses strategic conundrum

2013 Chinese Grand Prix Friday practice analysis

Sebastian Vettel, Red Bull, Shanghai, 2013In practice for the Chinese Grand Prix drivers discovered the soft tyre is far quicker than the medium compound but does not last long.

They found it good for a single flying lap in second practice and were unable to improve on subsequent runs. “It looks like the soft tyre is the one for qualifying, but it seems that we won?t see that many stints on the soft tyre during the race,” said Mark Webber.

Webber’s 14-lap stint on the medium tyre (see graph below) showed it should stand up well in the race. As Pirelli motorsport director Paul Hembery notice, it should prove more durable once the track conditions improve:

“In total, we?d expect the soft tyre to last between 11 to 12 laps in the race and the medium tyre for about 18 laps. This would suggest a maximum of three pit stops but it?s also possible that we?ll see two stops if the track keeps on evolving at this rate.”

Hembery put the performance difference between the tyres at “around one-and-a-half seconds, which is a little higher than we initially expected but it?s still early days here”.

This adds up to a strategic conundrum for the teams similar to what unfolded in Melbourne. The soft tyre is undoubtedly the way to go for those in the hunt for pole position. But those expecting to be in the lower reaches of Q3, and those who qualify on row six, might be better off starting on the harder compound, as Adrian Sutil did at the Australian race.

Kimi Raikkonen, Lotus, Shanghai, 2013“There may well be people who chose, in Q3, to conserve tyres or plan to start on the more durable tyre,” said Ross Brawn. “But I think pole position will be set on the soft tyre because it’s so
much faster.”

Shanghai is a circuit where the track condition improves rapidly, particularly on the first day of running. This may go some way to explained Felipe Massa’s final time in second practice being considerably quicker than Nico Rosberg’s but the pace of the Ferrari should not be underestimated.

Ferrari led the way in the first two sectors of the lap with Mercedes – and Rosberg in particular – showing great pace in the final sector.

Lotus, meanwhile, appear to have much better pace on the soft tyre than the medium, which may not help them in the race.

Here’s all the data from practice for the Chinese Grand Prix.

Longest stint comparison

This chart shows all the drivers’ lap times (in seconds) during their longest unbroken stint:

http://www.f1fanatic.co.uk/charts/2013drivercolours.csv

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
Sebastian Vettel 105.608 105.724 106.755 107.261 107.819
Mark Webber 104.275 104.256 103.232 103.31 103.654 103.967 103.776 103.451 106.533 103.483 103.531 103.046 103.078 102.422
Fernando Alonso 102.668 103.809 105.745 105.722 106.043 106.355 107.513
Felipe Massa 101.309 108.765 102.048 103.039 102.866 105.163 106.04 103.553 104.107 103.998
Jenson Button 103.639 104.175 105.585 105.862 105.488 106.345 107.328
Sergio Perez 104.907 105.843 105.948 106.997 107.379
Kimi Raikkonen 103.448 103.313 104.046 103.622 103.747 104.282 104.35 105.798
Romain Grosjean 103.914 103.341 103.738 103.403 104.056 103.722 103.222 103.337
Nico Rosberg 102.244 103.749 104.41 103.089 102.919 102.946 103.436 105.23 103.282 103.58 103.748 104.297 104.3
Lewis Hamilton 102.706 103.62 103.377 103.535 102.811 103.426 112.201 103.708 103.453 103.299 104.116 105.265 108.375 104.668 106.876
Nico Hulkenberg 103.337 103.741 103.709 104.572 106.354 103.9 104.433 105.057 105.184
Esteban Gutierrez 104.144 104.66 104.973 105.99 106.93
Paul di Resta 102.706 102.756 103.578 103.836 103.321 103.04 103.54 103.401
Adrian Sutil 103.696 103.369 104.326 104.002 104.666 105.384 104.316 103.647
Pastor Maldonado 103.659 103.77 103.671 103.81 103.827 104.57 105.084 105.26 106.124
Valtteri Bottas 104.941 105.073 106.422 107.514 106.378 106.097
Jean-Eric Vergne 105.636 105.515 105.55 106.474 105.132 104.668 107.065 107.09 105.301 105.198 105.453 105.949 106.292 106.83
Daniel Ricciardo 105.254 104.16 104.266 106.359 104.862 104.844 104.535 104.273 104.946 104.738 105.221 106.717 106.512 106.358 106.864 110.285
Charles Pic 108.601 107.632 110.362 112.006 107.801 108.424 108.254 108.411 110.36 109.919
Giedo van der Garde 106.178 106.201 108.247 109.437 108.177 109.807
Jules Bianchi 105.993 106.078 106.926 106.847 106.934 107.777 109.389
Max Chilton 103.227 108.593

Sector times and ultimate lap times

Pos No. Driver Car S1 S2 S2 Ultimate Gap Deficit to best
1 4 Felipe Massa Ferrari 24.935 (1) 28.337 (1) 42.068 (4) 1’35.340 0.000
2 7 Kimi Raikkonen Lotus-Renault 24.937 (2) 28.455 (2) 42.100 (6) 1’35.492 0.152 0.000
3 3 Fernando Alonso Ferrari 25.195 (3) 28.671 (4) 41.889 (2) 1’35.755 0.415 0.000
4 9 Nico Rosberg Mercedes 25.281 (8) 28.682 (5) 41.856 (1) 1’35.819 0.479 0.000
5 2 Mark Webber Red Bull-Renault 25.347 (11) 28.655 (3) 42.090 (5) 1’36.092 0.752 0.000
6 10 Lewis Hamilton Mercedes 25.210 (5) 29.126 (14) 41.968 (3) 1’36.304 0.964 0.192
7 5 Jenson Button McLaren-Mercedes 25.271 (7) 28.694 (6) 42.467 (10) 1’36.432 1.092 0.000
8 15 Adrian Sutil Force India-Mercedes 25.209 (4) 28.931 (10) 42.374 (7) 1’36.514 1.174 0.000
9 14 Paul di Resta Force India-Mercedes 25.230 (6) 28.905 (8) 42.460 (8) 1’36.595 1.255 0.000
10 1 Sebastian Vettel Red Bull-Renault 25.288 (9) 28.936 (11) 42.567 (12) 1’36.791 1.451 0.000
11 6 Sergio Perez McLaren-Mercedes 25.304 (10) 28.922 (9) 42.714 (15) 1’36.940 1.600 0.000
12 8 Romain Grosjean Lotus-Renault 25.386 (12) 29.076 (12) 42.501 (11) 1’36.963 1.623 0.000
13 12 Esteban Gutierrez Sauber-Ferrari 25.620 (13) 28.880 (7) 42.603 (13) 1’37.103 1.763 0.000
14 19 Daniel Ricciardo Toro Rosso-Ferrari 25.648 (14) 29.092 (13) 42.466 (9) 1’37.206 1.866 0.000
15 11 Nico Hulkenberg Sauber-Ferrari 25.782 (15) 29.354 (17) 42.751 (16) 1’37.887 2.547 0.324
16 17 Valtteri Bottas Williams-Renault 25.854 (16) 29.308 (16) 42.893 (17) 1’38.055 2.715 0.130
17 18 Jean-Eric Vergne Toro Rosso-Ferrari 25.972 (18) 29.445 (18) 42.710 (14) 1’38.127 2.787 0.000
18 16 Pastor Maldonado Williams-Renault 25.934 (17) 29.237 (15) 43.105 (19) 1’38.276 2.936 0.000
19 22 Jules Bianchi Marussia-Cosworth 26.063 (20) 29.608 (19) 43.054 (18) 1’38.725 3.385 0.000
20 21 Giedo van der Garde Caterham-Renault 26.054 (19) 29.801 (20) 43.416 (20) 1’39.271 3.931 0.000
21 20 Charles Pic Caterham-Renault 26.079 (21) 29.968 (21) 43.767 (21) 1’39.814 4.474 0.000
22 23 Max Chilton Marussia-Cosworth 27.090 (22) 30.912 (22) 45.225 (22) 1’43.227 7.887 0.000

Complete practice times

Pos Driver Car FP1 FP2 Total laps
1 Felipe Massa Ferrari 1’38.095 1’35.340 46
2 Kimi Raikkonen Lotus-Renault 1’38.790 1’35.492 48
3 Fernando Alonso Ferrari 1’37.965 1’35.755 47
4 Nico Rosberg Mercedes 1’36.717 1’35.819 56
5 Mark Webber Red Bull-Renault 1’37.658 1’36.092 52
6 Jenson Button McLaren 1’38.069 1’36.432 54
7 Lewis Hamilton Mercedes 1’37.171 1’36.496 59
8 Adrian Sutil Force India-Mercedes 1’38.125 1’36.514 53
9 Paul di Resta Force India-Mercedes 1’38.561 1’36.595 48
10 Sebastian Vettel Red Bull-Renault 1’37.942 1’36.791 47
11 Sergio Perez McLaren 1’39.360 1’36.940 36
12 Romain Grosjean Lotus-Renault 1’38.398 1’36.963 48
13 Esteban Gutierrez Sauber-Ferrari 1’40.032 1’37.103 44
14 Daniel Ricciardo Toro Rosso-Ferrari 1’39.336 1’37.206 58
15 Jean-Eric Vergne Toro Rosso-Ferrari 1’39.057 1’38.127 53
16 Valtteri Bottas Williams-Renault 1’39.392 1’38.185 39
17 Nico Hulkenberg Sauber-Ferrari 1’39.180 1’38.211 53
18 Pastor Maldonado Williams-Renault 1’39.158 1’38.276 56
19 Jules Bianchi Marussia-Cosworth 1’41.966 1’38.725 45
20 Giedo van der Garde Caterham-Renault 1’42.083 1’39.271 42
21 Charles Pic Caterham-Renault 1’39.814 27
22 Max Chilton Marussia-Cosworth 1’42.056 1’43.227 23
23 Ma Qing Hua Caterham-Renault 1’43.545 20

Speed trap

# Driver Car Engine Max speed (kph) Gap
1 12 Esteban Gutierrez Sauber Ferrari 321
2 11 Nico Hulkenberg Sauber Ferrari 320.1 0.9
3 9 Nico Rosberg Mercedes Mercedes 319.9 1.1
4 10 Lewis Hamilton Mercedes Mercedes 319.8 1.2
5 4 Felipe Massa Ferrari Ferrari 318.7 2.3
6 3 Fernando Alonso Ferrari Ferrari 318.5 2.5
7 23 Max Chilton Marussia Cosworth 318.4 2.6
8 22 Jules Bianchi Marussia Cosworth 317.9 3.1
9 7 Kimi Raikkonen Lotus Renault 317.5 3.5
10 8 Romain Grosjean Lotus Renault 317.4 3.6
11 21 Giedo van der Garde Caterham Renault 315.5 5.5
12 14 Paul di Resta Force India Mercedes 315.5 5.5
13 20 Charles Pic Caterham Renault 315.1 5.9
14 1 Sebastian Vettel Red Bull Renault 315 6
15 18 Jean-Eric Vergne Toro Rosso Ferrari 314.9 6.1
16 19 Daniel Ricciardo Toro Rosso Ferrari 314.8 6.2
17 2 Mark Webber Red Bull Renault 314.2 6.8
18 15 Adrian Sutil Force India Mercedes 312.3 8.7
19 5 Jenson Button McLaren Mercedes 307.3 13.7
20 6 Sergio Perez McLaren Mercedes 307.1 13.9
21 16 Pastor Maldonado Williams Renault 305.4 15.6
22 17 Valtteri Bottas Williams Renault 305.3 15.7

2013 Chinese Grand Prix

Browse all 2013 Chinese Grand Prix articles

Images ?? Red Bull/Getty, Lotus/LAT

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83 comments on Soft tyre’s short life poses strategic conundrum

  1. MNM101 (@mnm101) said on 12th April 2013, 14:57

    @keithcollantine any chance you can share where you get all this timing information from ?

  2. Ivano (@) said on 12th April 2013, 14:58

    I find it interesting how the speed trap paired togerther teammates with the exception of Force India.

    • Ivano (@) said on 12th April 2013, 14:58

      *together

    • BasCB (@bascb) said on 12th April 2013, 15:16

      hm, that might indicate a bit of a split setup strategy then

      • HoHum (@hohum) said on 12th April 2013, 15:36

        @bascb, I might add RBR are a little further apart than normal, according to NBC commentary Webber was running a smaller wing than Vettel but the trap-speed would suggest otherwise. Also of interest, of the front runners only Webber finished faster than he started, after 14 laps ! If this is real RBR are looking very good for the race, providing they finish.

        • BasCB (@bascb) said on 12th April 2013, 15:48

          Maybe the RW Webber had proved the better one, and helped conserve tyres. From the footage, I understood Vettel has a new one (Kravitz) and he was not satisfied after his run, so its possible that the wing is not bringing them the results they had hoped for.

          • HoHum (@hohum) said on 12th April 2013, 16:38

            No doubt SV will use MW’s data to improve his “package”, the talk of “not sharing data” is from a bygone era, the pit-wall crew know everything. I am still wondering if the data is real though, no-one else seemed to be getting faster on long runs and Webbers lap 14 time was one of the fastest on the graph.

      • It could indicate Di Resta is a bit desperate to beat his team mate, I guess.
        Going for a less-downforce, ‘more agressive through the fast corners’ setting.

        Should be interesting to see which one pays off when, relative to single-lap speed and race-pace.

  3. Force Maikel (@force-maikel) said on 12th April 2013, 15:01

    Horrible tyres, absolutely dreadful, poor f1. Still…….get on with it! You’re the pinnacle of motorsport, prove it by getting on top of these tyres: both drivers and teams surely can get these tyres under control.

    • karter22 (@karter22) said on 12th April 2013, 15:40

      @force-maikel
      I agree about the tyres being crap but the last part of your statement is dead on!! Everybody, and I do mean everybody should just deal with it. Teams, drivers and fans!

    • Fer no.65 (@fer-no65) said on 12th April 2013, 15:59

      @force-maikel as we saw last year, they can. It’s just these couple of races where everything is a question mark. If we had testing like we used to, they’d know the tyres already at this point.

      Maybe they should chose better venues to test during winter to represent more closely the conditions of the Grand Prixs… afterall, they completely avoided testing the SuperSofts this year, and when they got to use them, they had no idea what to expect.

      • Force Maikel (@force-maikel) said on 12th April 2013, 17:33

        Not to mention it was a lot colder during testing this year. But on what tracks should they be testing according to you? Keep in mind F1 teams don’t want to pay a heap of money for transportation and certainly not for pre-season testing.

        • Red Andy (@red-andy) said on 12th April 2013, 19:22

          They tested in Bahrain until a couple of years ago, owing to the warmer winter temperatures, although the present political situation makes it pretty unlikely that teams would want to return there, other than for the race (which is controversial enough).

        • Fer no.65 (@fer-no65) said on 12th April 2013, 21:05

          Keep in mind F1 teams don’t want to pay a heap of money for transportation and certainly not for pre-season testing.

          @force-maikel I know. Hence why they shouldn’t have complained when they “found out” that Jerez had nothing to do wiht any of the tracks in the calendar.

          They don’t want to spend more money, but then it keeps raining, and it’s very very cold. And they complain. You can’t have the best out of both worlds…

          • Joe Papp (@joepa) said on 12th April 2013, 23:42

            Right!! They should just deal w/ it – and so should the fans! and the media!!

          • karter22 (@karter22) said on 13th April 2013, 2:24

            @force-maikel , @fer-no65

            Might I chip in and say maybe they should drop Jerez and change it for Mugello maybe? I don´t know what the temperature might be like at that time of the year but it seems it would be a better suited track. Or maybe one in Portugal or if they want to keep it in Spain, why not the Jarama circuit?

          • Fer no.65 (@fer-no65) said on 13th April 2013, 3:05

            @karter22 Jarama? doubt it. It’s little over 3.5 km long. Very tiny. Plus, it’s rather old.

            Mugello is a great track, but as Petrov mentioned last year, it’s probably not up to F1 standards in terms of safety. And it’s hardly representative of any other racetrack in the calendar, so that’d be pointless. If anything, it’d just benefit Ferrari, because they are close to the track.

            Maybe they should go to another continent… that’d be costly, ofc, but they used to test in Kyalami in the late parts of 1990′s and Bahrain not that long ago, so why not? Afterall, that could make it better during the season for them, hence using less resorces.

  4. OmarR-Pepper (@omarr-pepper) said on 12th April 2013, 15:09

    These tyres have the same life span than the “Dollar shop” products!

    Note aside, has England changed into a spring time? I mean, the round up was delivered an hour later, and now I see my time zone diffeence is +6, yesterday it was just +5

  5. AdrianMorse (@adrianmorse) said on 12th April 2013, 15:22

    In defense of the Pirelli tyres, Paul Hembery called the soft “qualifying tyres” (Autosport article). It will be interesting to see what will happen in Monaco, when they bring two types of qualifying tyres to race on, or whether they will hold up on a the streets of Monte Carlo.

    Anyway, it would be great to see Massa on pole. He’s gone well at this track before, as in his woeful 2011 season this was one of the few races where he finished ahead of Alonso. This race may also be the opportunity for Lotus to qualify at the front, if the softs are working so well for them. And if they do start at the front, I doubt their performance on the medium tyres will be so weak that they will drop back dramatically.

    Rosberg looks on it once again. Hamilton admitted (interview with Sky, if I recall correctly) that he’s not that comfortable in the car yet, while Rosberg looks at the top of his game since Malaysia. I think Mercedes have a good chance of fighting for the victory here, especially with Vettel admitting he was concerned by the gap to the leaders – although he almost always manages to find something for Q3.

    • Force Maikel (@force-maikel) said on 12th April 2013, 15:33

      Major difference was that they said the it would last 18 laps. From what I’ve seen most cars wont make it to 10. And it will be 10 horrible laps for those drivers.

      • BasCB (@bascb) said on 12th April 2013, 15:50

        Webber’s already taken his mediums to 14 laps, and china does rubber in a lot, so its perfectly realistic to expect some 20 laps on those. The softs are a different story however, I guess new sets could last 8-12 laps depending on when they are used, but the guys who use them for Q3, well that is a different story …

    • HoHum (@hohum) said on 12th April 2013, 16:46

      @adrianmorse, Vettel will find something for Q3, Webbers set-up.

      • Dwight_js said on 12th April 2013, 20:02

        You realize that they are testing different aero packages on the two cars and not just tweaking setups. Judging qualifying and race pace by the practice sessions is not a smart thing to do.

  6. Timothy Katz (@timothykatz) said on 12th April 2013, 15:50

    Can someone remind me of how the rules work again.
    If a driver sets a time on a set of tyres in Q3 and is then able to demonstrate to the Stewards that they are dangerousely damaged, is he able to swop them for another set? And dothey have to be the same grade?
    How many sets does each car have for the entire three day event?

    • sato113 (@sato113) said on 12th April 2013, 16:11

      if he seriously flat spots a tyre in Q3 I believe you are allowed to replace that single tyre. you must not touch the other 3 tyres. I think this is the only scenario where a single tyre is modified within the 4.

      • Is that right? I am almost sure that I’d read that all 4 tires must come from the same set, which is why they are numbered.

        • Oh guess not,

          25.3 Control of tyres:
          a) The outer sidewall of all tyres which are to be used at an Event must be marked with a unique identification.
          b) Other than in cases of force majeure (accepted as such by the stewards of the meeting), all tyres intended for use at an Event must be presented to the FIA technical delegate for allocation prior to the end of initial scrutineering.
          c) At any time during an Event, and at his absolute discretion, the FIA technical delegate may select alternative dry-weather tyres to be used by any team or driver from among the stock of tyres the appointed supplier has present at the Event.
          d) A competitor wishing to replace one unused tyre by another identical unused one must present both tyres to the FIA technical delegate.

  7. sato113 (@sato113) said on 12th April 2013, 16:10

    this is gonna make for an exciting race! if your tyres are going off, then pit!

  8. HoHum (@hohum) said on 12th April 2013, 16:50

    So, how many cars are going to set Q3 times on the primes? seems like a reasonable gamble to me.

  9. Hello Kitty said on 12th April 2013, 16:57

    Has anybody noticed how the Lotus head on, looks like a Baboon from behind?

  10. Garns (@garns) said on 12th April 2013, 17:05

    I think the tyre situation has gone a tad too far! There is a fine line between race stratergy and your tyres going away real fast! Webber on the Malaysian Wake (Sorry- podium!!) and others at some stages have said they are racing at 80% due to tyres. I dont pay a heap to go to races to see the worlds best drivers go at 80%!! I think 90-95% in a race about right.

    I first went to an F1 race in 1986. I was 10, knew nothing of a “race stratergy” but these things were FAST & LOUD- and I loved it. I cant remember the years but since watching have seen pits stops for tyres, pit stops for tyres & fuel, NO pit stops for tyres nor fuel (pit stop crews overpaid there LOL) – now of course we have tyres only. Late 80′s I think they would start on a full tank, great tyres and run a full race- not great viewing sometimes!

    I like a two or maybe three stop race for tyres but hope re-fueling stays out. But the guys need to race until the end not do these crap team orders- fans dont like that!!

    I think Schumacher found his comeback hard, not because he had become too slow, but because the whole race stratergy had changed. He would be fast, get pole, start well and win- harder to do now if you change tyres 3 times.

    Has F1 become too much of “what is best viewing for the TV Fans” (Hence money) rather than who is the BEST driver?
    Thoughts?

  11. Roger2013 said on 12th April 2013, 17:07

    These tyres are simply horrid, Pirelli are starting to go way too far.

    Its no longer about racing, Its no longer about racing hard, Its become a tyre conservation formula where everyone just runs around well off the limit because if they dare try & push the tyres fall off a cliff.

    Pirelli’s fans say ‘tyre management has always been a part of f1′ & that is true, However at no point in the history of F1 has it ever been anywhere close to as important as it is today.
    At no point in F1′s history has the biggest story before, during & after a race weekend been tyres yet today all you ever hear about is tyres & is starting to get ridiculous.

    Its no wonder you hear drivers talk about F1 racing been less physical today because there all driving around to a lap delta at 70-80% the limit & that is zero fun to watch & has to me zero entertainment value.

    If I wanted to see drivers running around conserving tyres I’d watch Endurance racing where you get double/triple stints on tyres so need to nurse them. However since I hate that sort of racing I don’t watch endurance racing & may soon no longer watch F1 is this stupidity continues!

  12. this is probably lotus’ best chance to get onto the front row for a long time, though they look slower than ferrari, rbr, merc so far on race pace.

  13. bimo said on 12th April 2013, 17:24

    Wake up guys..this is a new era of motor-racing, when driver needs to adopt their driving style each and every laps. I watch F1 since early 90s and no need to complain about regulations that WILL ALWAYS changed just like life. Kimi is older in F1 than Webber and missed 2 years but he never complains, even last year he lost tires in China but not complained, just adopt.

    • So we should have to adapt to a change for the worse, that is intended to “spice up the show”? The whole purpose of Pirelli’s designed-to-degrade tyres is that it is supposed to make the racing more entertaining for fans, and from what I’ve gathered the general consensus (on F1fanatic at least) is that Pirelli have gone too far and it’s affecting the racing for the worse. This is very much a case of “too much of a good thing” (if you believe it was a good thing in the first place).

      You can’t compare these changes to many of those in the past because most changes are designed to cap one cars advantage or on the grounds of safety – Pirelli’s tyres are neither of those things.

      The whole point is that they are supposed to increase the excitement for the fans, so we very much have the right to complain!

      • Lari said on 12th April 2013, 18:37

        Yes, you have the right to complain but we’ve all seen and “heard” it already enough times. Now press “Stop” on your casetteplayer and change the casette to something new. It’s ok to complain about something but doing it repeatedly every single chance you have is just plain stupid and waste of good energy. Didn’t Monty Python teach you to always look on the bright side of life?

        • Dizzy said on 12th April 2013, 19:02

          If nobody complains then nothing will change.

          The more people complain & the louder those complaints get then the more chance that those within Pirelli/F1 will actually listen.

          If you simply complain once or twice & then shut up then your complaints will fade & nothing will change.

          • timi (@timi) said on 12th April 2013, 19:26

            And you think comments on an F1 fan site will change anything?

            If you actually want things to change, I’d suggest either stop watching the raves (lower audience numbers/ratings), or send the FIA a formal complaint. I assure you, your comments will do absolutely nothing to change anything :)

          • Dizzy said on 12th April 2013, 20:19

            And you think comments on an F1 fan site will change anything?

            Maybe, I know of other F1 news sites similar to this which gets viewed by FOTA representatives & others who work inside F1.

          • Lari said on 12th April 2013, 21:22

            Repeating same complaint over and over in multiple F1 sites won’t do it, you still watch the races. If you want to try to make an impact, you need to stop watching F1. If viewing numbers are going down fast, then they MIGHT react to it, not to some home-expert whining over and over.

        • fangio85 (@fangio85) said on 13th April 2013, 1:25

          @lari
          Lol, casette player.. are you from north Korea by any chance? ;)

      • bimo said on 13th April 2013, 5:53

        The regulations try to limit fastest car to dominate like in 2004, just imagine back then when Schumi lapping 1 second a lap faster but then loosing 3 seconds a lap in the closing stage..exciting. And we do not have horrific accident like in bridgestone era. So I think it is pretty much works by your objectives.

  14. JamieFranklinF1 (@jamiefranklinf1) said on 12th April 2013, 18:11

    The Ferraris and Mercs seem to look the best in terms of race pace, and I wouldn’t be surprised to see Rosberg get his second victory on Sunday. Red Bull aren’t look quite as impressive, especially Vettel.

  15. John H (@john-h) said on 12th April 2013, 18:20

    Since F1′s success measure became directly proportional to overtaking, something else has been forgotten.. drivers pushing on the limit and being on the edge every lap…even if their tyres are going off. That was part of the skill.

    In 2013, driving to lap delta times to preserve tyre wear relegates the driver to little more than a thermostat. It’s the only thing where Helmut Marko has spoken sense.

    Towards the end of 2012 for a fleeting few races this wasn’t the case, and it was great! Drivers going wide, pumping in fast lap times whilst still racing each other and also just about able to defend attack (drs aside).

    Alas the success of the end of 2012 has now been replaced with this again. It makes me feel sad.

    • HoHum (@hohum) said on 12th April 2013, 19:44

      @john-h, not surprisingly the good racing at the end of 2012 coincided with the harder more durable tyres being used, this obvious cause and effect is conveniently overlooked by the “tyre management is exciting” fans. I have a sneaking suspicion that many Pirelli supporters are fans of teams or drivers that don’t normally appear on the podium, hopeful that if their fav team/driver can’t be good they might be lucky.

      • Joe Papp (@joepa) said on 12th April 2013, 23:47

        I’m an F1 supporter – not a Pirelli supporter, per se – but I support Pirelli for the great job they’ve done making tires that inhibit processional racing. I love F1 under Pirelli and wish they made bike tires so I could mount some on my machine to show my support!

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