Di Resta ‘could be champion in a Red Bull’ – Fernley

F1 Fanatic round-up

Paul di Resta, Force India, Bahrain, 2013In the round-up: Force India deputy team principal Bob Fernley believes Paul di Resta could be a world champion in the right car:

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Your daily digest of F1 news, views, features and more.

‘Paul could be a Champion’ (Sky)

Fernley: “Absolutely, there is no reason why he and a number of others would not have as well, but certainly Paul could.”

The Finishing Line – with Force India?s Paul di Resta (F1)

“The most memorable overtaking move of my career was…
PdR: It was a move I made in DTM at turn ten of the Formula One track in Barcelona, passing Timo Scheider. It was in 2008 and it was a change for the championship and a pass for the lead of the race.”

McLaren deny Dennis demotion (BBC)

“Asked whether there was any doubt that he would stay at McLaren until at least the end of his current contract, Dennis said: ‘Categorically, that is exactly what is going to happen – unless I request for it to be changed, and I don’t intend to. I couldn’t work any harder than I am on a variety of things.’”

Honda, Toyota F1 interest ‘unimaginable’ (Crash)

Renault Sport F1 managing director Rob White: “The first project meetings were held four years ago, and the interest was great, with Audi, Cosworth, Ilmor, Honda, Toyota, Mecachrome and others [present]. However, as it got more specific, only PURE was left, and now it’s only us three.”

Analysis: Raised Rear Wishbones (ScarbsF1)

“For 2013, almost every team have taken the same approach pioneered by Red Bull in 2012, by raising the rear lower wishbone.”

Siffert and Rodriguez (MotorSport)

“Boots were on different feet now. BRM was Pedro?s patch, having driven for it in 1968 and scored in 1970 ?ǣ at his beloved Spa ?ǣ its first GP win for four years. It was Pedro who chatted affably with the mechanics and Jo who remained aloof.”

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Comment of the day

Does IndyCar now have less artificial racing than F1?

I?ve said a few times recently and stick by it today that in terms of the ??racing?, IndyCar has been better and way more exciting to watch than F1 since they introduced the current car.

There?s no silly gimmicks like DRS (So all passing in IndyCar is exciting to watch unlike F1), no tyres that wear in six laps (so drivers can push and race hard), it’s just pure, hard fought racing which overall is way more enjoyable and exciting to watch than anything F1′s managed to do in the DRS/Pirelli era.

I?ve been going to the F1 race at Montreal since the early eighties, This year I won?t be going but will be going to the IndyCar races at Toronto and Belle Isle.
Roger2013

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On this day in F1

Antonio Felix da Costa, Helmut Marko, Red Bull, Shanghai, 2013Happy birthday to Red Bull’s motorsport advisor Helmut Marko who is 70 today.

Marko’s F1 career came to an untimely end in his ninth start, the 1972 French Grand Prix, when a stone kicked up by another car pierced his visor and blinded him in one eye.

Marko began guiding the career of upcoming fellow Austrian driver Helmuth Koinigg, until his death at Watkins Glen in 1974. Marko later ran F3 and F3000 teams before running Red Bull’s Driver Development programme and helping Sebastian Vettel to his current position at the pinnacle of the sport.

However the abrupt dismissals faced by several other drivers on the scheme and Marko’s undisguised contempt for Vettel’s team mate Mark Webber have made him a less than popular figure.

Images ?? Force India, Red Bull/Getty

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174 comments on Di Resta ‘could be champion in a Red Bull’ – Fernley

  1. I feel a bit sorry for PURE. They were told that turbos would be 2013 and surely budgeted for that. Then it was all changed and moved back a year. Companies can not run like that, contracts and agreements in place would all fall through and the knock on effect would be massive financially. They arent all Honda, Renault, Mercedes and Ferrari who have other pots to dip into.

    • HoHum (@hohum) said on 27th April 2013, 15:54

      The ultimate intention is to have only one engine in F1, I’m surprised Renault stayed in, I guess with RBR winning championships the publicity is to good to quit.

      • OmarR-Pepper (@omarr-pepper) said on 27th April 2013, 17:36

        @hohum But if F1 were with just one engine, it would resemble (in some way) the A1GP. Probably the aero part would be more aggressive, but teams would complain all year round! Who could be in charge of a unique engine (and not gaining from the deep knowledge of that)? Ferrari? Mercedes? Renault? I think Ferrari would NEVER accept to run a Mercedes engine, and viceversa. All the other teams, though, can adapt to it because there isn’t that much pride involved into their names. But for sure they would complain (as much as it happened when Bridgestone produced a special tyre for Ferrari back in the days of tyre wars)

        • HoHum (@hohum) said on 27th April 2013, 23:14

          MadMax wanted Cosworth to build ” the F1 Engine” for the change to the current V8 engine rule, but got caught being naughty so it did not happen, hurray!
          I always wonder who tipped off the papers, my best guess is a non executive chairman of a F1 based company. F1 with equal engines is just GP2+.

  2. craig-o (@craig-o) said on 27th April 2013, 11:23

    I’m not a fan of Vettel, but at the end of the day he’s a three-time world champion. Not even Jim Clark, Fernando Alonso, Nigel Mansell and other ‘great’ drivers are not a three-time world champion.

    Vettel has some insane speed. You just have to look at some of his races in his Toro Rosso days, and you need to think beyond Monza in 2008. He was able to run right at the front in quite a few races, especially in tricky conditions. In 2007 he led in Fuji and finished 4th in Shanghai. In 2008 he finished 5th in Monaco, 5th again in Belgium, won in Monza and was running at the front for the majority of the race in Brazil before finishing 4th. All of this was done in a car which was quite some way off Ferrari, McLaren, BMW, Renault for some part, and other much more established teams. I still struggle to see how many people claim that he’s not very good.

    What has Paul Di Resta achieved in a midfield car? A pair 4th places, on circuits which arguably suit that car. He’s a lot of talk but not really much action. He was trounced by both Sutil and Hulkenberg in 2011 and 2012 and you can’t win world championships if you can’t comfortably beat unproven drivers.

    • craig-o (@craig-o) said on 27th April 2013, 11:30

      Should read Not even Jim Clark, Fernando Alonso, Nigel Mansell and other ‘great’ drivers are three-time world champion.

    • OmarR-Pepper (@omarr-pepper) said on 27th April 2013, 14:31

      Ye s@craig-o, excellent comment. There is a problem when people prefer sticking to an opinion (“he’s bad”, “Newey won the WDCs”, “Rivals had bad luck”) rather than seeing the races, analyzing the facts, and then wriiting it down.
      I would consider myself a fool if I denied how great Fernando, Kimi and Lewis are, even Jenson is strong. I could even mock about some of the things they do and say. But that doesn’t mean I should start saying “They are bad drivers, they wouldn’t be champions” Come on.

    • mnmracer (@mnmracer) said on 27th April 2013, 15:10

      Even if you disregard Vettel’s Torro Rosso win, Vettel scored more (converted) points in 23 races with Torro Rosso, than di Resta has in his first two seasons (39 races) with Force India.

      • craig-o (@craig-o) said on 27th April 2013, 17:59

        @mnmracer In addition to that, Vettel done that on the 10-8-6-5-4-3-2-1 system rather than the current one.

      • mnmracer (@mnmracer) said on 27th April 2013, 18:53

        Well, in all honesty, that’s why I said converted, but even if not, it’s ridiculously close.

        Vettel in Toro Rosso, in 24 races in 2007 and 2008 (excluding America ’07 > BMW), scored 40 old points, which is 103 points in new points. That’s a point average of 4.3 new points, or 1.7 old points.
        Exclude for some his win in Italy, and he still scored 30 old points, and 78 new points. That’s still a point average of 3.25 new points, or 1.25 old points.

        Paul di Resta in 39 races in 2010 and 2011, scored 73 new points, which would have been 22 old points. That’s a point average of 1.9 new points, or 0.6 old points.

        • craig-o (@craig-o) said on 27th April 2013, 19:06

          @mnmracer Oh I had misread that! Sorry! I’m not quite with it today, still an interesting comparison though. We both agree on the basis that Vettel was consistently towards the front in his STR days, while Di Resta has the odd flash of brilliance, but it’s not frequent enough, right?

  3. Daniel (@collettdumbletonhall) said on 27th April 2013, 12:11

    Anyone else see Lewis Hamilton on Graham Norton last night?

  4. JackySteeg (@jackysteeg) said on 27th April 2013, 13:06

    Regarding the COTD — sorry, but if you find F1 to be a bit too “gimmicky” then I do not believe IndyCars is the place to go.

    Whether or not its more artificial than F1 is debatable, but with yellow flags every 10 laps, those infernal double-file restarts (seemingly designed to cause more accidents) and the rules against blocking which make overtaking nearly as easy as with DRS, you cannot say that IndyCar is completely devoid of gimmicks.

    If you want a strong, international and pure racing series, then I’d suggest going for the WEC.

    • @jackystegg precisely, but that was more of a response to accusations made that the quality of Indycar driving was fairly poor relative to F1 (I’m not going to disclose who the accusation was from :P).

      I do feel when I’m watching Indycar that it’s primative and very, not wishing to be disrespectful, “American”. Which is why I’m disappointed F1 seems to be trying to go down the same route of artificial action.

    • craig-o (@craig-o) said on 27th April 2013, 18:03

      I agree. Though sometimes I like the gimmicks and the show that IndyCar puts on. There’s some great characters there too. I feel IndyCar is far more gimmicky than F1, but the show is great for both, so I’m not complaining!

    • BasCB (@bascb) said on 29th April 2013, 8:06

      And complaining about tyre life when in Indycar they have the reds that go off after not all that much time too as well … yeah, the COTD is nicely written, but I don’t really see what it says, apart from the fact the racing is pretty good in between the strategy!

  5. BJ (@beejis60) said on 27th April 2013, 15:12

    The title of this article made me laugh…

    OUT LOUD

  6. TMF (@tmf42) said on 27th April 2013, 16:04

    I think DiResta wouldn’t win a championship if he has a competitive teammate. Just look at his attitude towards FI. Paraphrasing him – “if they [the team] want a podium they have to give me a faster car”. It’s no coincidence why ALO, VET HAM and others never refer to their team as they.

    • Jason (@jason12) said on 27th April 2013, 17:33

      @tmf42
      Please don’t put Vettel in the same league as ALO and HAM.
      He crumbles under pressure, and really hasn’t proven himself as one of the greatest drivers (despite 3WDCs, and a possible 4th).

      • mnmracer (@mnmracer) said on 27th April 2013, 19:46

        The list of ex-drivers and pundits that thoroughly disagree with you is quite large, but includes Stirling Moss, the collective team bosses, and the BBC.

      • Traverse (@) said on 27th April 2013, 21:45

        *SIGH*

      • David-A (@david-a) said on 27th April 2013, 22:31

        @jason12 – Yes, of course, in your little word, he crumbles under pressure when he’s won 2 titles in the final round.

      • @jason12 you’ve just listed Vettel’s greatest strength. Congratulations.

        • Yappy said on 28th April 2013, 10:16

          @Jason12

          I would not class Vettel the same as Alonso or Hamilton. He went and flogged all the records those two held. Considering he spent about three years not being WDC and three years being WDC great does not even cover it. He does have time to improve and get better at driving though since he can’t overtake or win by more 30secs. He hasn’t won from pit lane or won power sliding.

      • BasCB (@bascb) said on 29th April 2013, 8:08

        @jason12

        Please don’t put Vettel in the same league as ALO and HAM.

        - Are they all racing in F1? check
        - Are they all multiple race winners? check
        - Are they all Champions? check
        - Have they all beaten their teammates in F1 more often than not? check
        So why shouldn’t they be put in the same league?

  7. xjr15jaaag (@xjr15jaaag) said on 27th April 2013, 16:59

    Is it true that Marko completed a law degree during his F1 career?

  8. Force Maikel (@force-maikel) said on 27th April 2013, 20:38

    Di Resta champion? Sure in another dimension that could be a possibility but not in this one. He has lost out to his 2 teammates Sutil and Hulkenberg. When he got beaten by Sutil most of his followers blamed it on being a rookie yet when he was beaten by real talent ‘hulk’ they said nothing. If he beats Sutil this season it proves nothing because we’re still talking about Adrian Sutil here (–> no championship material either).

    Another question: who wants him in the first place. McLaren? Nope full. Red Bull? They have plenty of in house material to choose from. Mercedes? Nope full too. Ferrari? mmm… yes he’s perfect number 2 material I’ll give him that. Force India? From what I understand this will his last year for them. His arrogant ass is not very appreciated in the team (The return of Sutil wasn’t welcomed with many happy faces either).

  9. Traverse (@) said on 27th April 2013, 21:33

    Can Di Resta become a WDC? Mr mediocre Jenson ‘crybaby’ Button achieved it so why not.

    • M Dickens (@sgt-pepper) said on 27th April 2013, 22:16

      (@hellotraverse) Woah woah woah, so it’s ok to belittle Button, but not Vettel?

      I’ll hand it to you that Button isn’t quite on the same level as Alonso, Kimi and Hamilton, but at least he has the grace to be extremely genuine and charming when outside the car, unlike another certain someone…

      • Traverse (@) said on 28th April 2013, 15:34

        but at least he has the grace to be extremely genuine and charming when outside the car, unlike another certain someone…

        Did you not see last weekends Bahrai GP? Mr mediocre showed himself to be anything but graceful and charming.

        • Traverse (@) said on 28th April 2013, 15:35

          *Bahrain

        • BasCB (@bascb) said on 29th April 2013, 8:15

          Wrong @hellotraverse

          Mr mediocre showed himself to be anything but graceful and charming.

          @sgt-pepper mentioned Button being

          extremely genuine and charming when outside the car

          (bold from me)

          And thats exactly what he did show in an interview AFTER the race, no doubt because he understood how his words from in the car would be seen by the world. Seems like very clever, civilized and charming a man then.

          Its laughable that you want to put down the efforts of Button but completely overreact to any criticism towards your favoured driver. I am pretty sure that had Button had a car that suited him as well as Vettel got along with the RBR cars in the past couple of years he would have had multiple WDCs by now too. As much as I am sure that Vettel has shown that he is a contender even when not in the outright best car all year.

          • Traverse (@) said on 29th April 2013, 14:47

            @bascb

            And thats exactly what he did show in an interview AFTER the race, no doubt because he understood how his words from in the car would be seen by the world. Seems like very clever, civilized and charming a man then.

            Mr Mediocre showed his TRUE colours during the race by ordering Whitmarsh via radio to ‘Calm him (Perez) down’, as if Perez is a pet dog to be bridled. He then realised that he let his ‘Mr Nice Guy’ MASK slip and then switched to PR mode to recover, giving the media the sounds bites they’ve become accustomed to receiving.

            The words Machiavellian, duplicitous and hypocrite spring to mind (NOT clever, civilized and charming).

            I am pretty sure that had Button had a car that suited him as well as Vettel got along with the RBR cars in the past couple of years he would have had multiple WDCs by now too.

            Of course he would, because as we all know the RBR drives itself. In fact Webber underperforms on purpose and could win the WDC if he felt like it, but chooses not to because the devil himself (Vettel) would smite him with his vengeful finger of DOOM.

            Its laughable that you want to put down the efforts of Button but completely overreact to any criticism towards your favoured driver.

            So It’s laughable that I criticise a two-faced, overrated, wannabe No.1 driver that limped across the line to win his WDC (despite being under no pressure from another driver throughout the season). On top of that, he had his behind routinely handed to him by Hamilton; he did finish ahead of him in 2011 but only because Ham had arguably his worst season in F1.

            Says it all really, he can only win when everyone else has a shocking race/season. And before you mention Canada 2011, he only won because he was overly aggressively with Alonso, forcing him off the track (he didn’t mind bumping wheels and ruining another drivers race) and the over-effective double DRS zones practically gifted him 2nd place, as both Webber and Schumi had no chance of defending. Without DRS Button wouldn’t have had enough laps or the raw ability to overtake the top 3 drivers, and almost certainly would’ve finished 4th.

            It’s no coincidence that Mr Mediocre suddenly unlocked his overtaking ability (as if it were an orb on a Sphere Grid) just as DRS was introduced. That’s one of the drawbacks with DRS, it gives drivers with no overtaking ability the false impression that they actually have guile and skill.

            As for my “overreacting” when someone criticises my “favoured driver”…Well, that IS a laughable statement. I’ve never overreacted, just employed a common sense approach and response to what is more times than not, a nonsense comment. :-)

          • BasCB (@bascb) said on 29th April 2013, 18:03

            @traverse, by now I feel sorry for having even tried to communicate with you.

            Just please go, read that post, then maybe read back some of the others you have recently made. Maybe compare it with Vettel fans who ARE reasonable to see the difference.

            If you think many critisize Vettel unfairly, you don’t have to look further than your own comments, because really the only thing different in them is the driver being on the receiving side. Not the arguments, nor the logic behind it.

            Once you grow up, and give drivers a bit of respect, you will likely feel ashamed of what you wrote about Button here.

          • Traverse (@) said on 29th April 2013, 19:19

            I have the right to criticise or indeed praise any driver as I see fit, as does every other contributor on this forum. I have never argued that people shouldn’t criticise a particular driver, I have just responded to their posts with a comment that I regard befitting.

            There’s no need for me to read, review or amend my comments as I stand by every word I write. I have a strong, unrelenting character (which the lady’s love btw) and once I get my teeth into an argument I don’t stop until my point is made loud and clear.

            I clearly touched a nerve and upset you to the point where you felt the need to bypass my actual post and judge my granite character instead. So I apologise for upsetting you @bascb. ;)

            It is funny though, how everyone criticises Vet and that’s fine, but the moment I make an observation about another driver suddenly I’m the one that must “Grow Up”…

    • Nick.UK (@) said on 28th April 2013, 5:37

      @hellotraverse

      I am hereby going to refer to Jenson purely as Mr mediocre crybaby Button FOREVER!! Haha.

      • M Dickens (@sgt-pepper) said on 29th April 2013, 16:04

        (@hellotraverse) Quite a reaction to (@bascb) and I simply saying Jenson’s a nice guy, though I understand having an almost irrational loathing of a driver considering the fact I want to break the t.v whenever Vettel’s smug face appears on it. Have three questions though;

        showed his TRUE colours during the race by ordering Whitmarsh via radio to ‘Calm him (Perez) down’, as if Perez is a pet dog to be bridled. He then realised that he let his ‘Mr Nice Guy’ MASK slip and then switched to PR mode to recover, giving the media the sounds bites they’ve become accustomed to receiving.

        Isn’t this almost exactly the same as the contempt in Vettel’s voice when demanding to ‘get him [Webber] out of the way,’ except Button and Webber have more right to refer to drivers in that way considering they’re the elder statesmen of F1?

        Says it all really, he can only win when everyone else has a shocking race/season.

        Surely this echoes critics such as myself arguing Vettel can only win in the best car? Although I havn’t quite made my mind up concerning Button’s abilities yet, he certainly seems very capable of beating the best when the car is to his liking, but that also appears to be a very small window of opportunity.

        the over-effective double DRS zones practically gifted him 2nd place, as both Webber and Schumi had no chance of defending. Without DRS Button wouldn’t have had enough laps or the raw ability to overtake the top 3 drivers, and almost certainly would’ve finished 4th.

        That’s one of the drawbacks with DRS, it gives drivers with no overtaking ability the false impression that they actually have guile and skill.

        This sounds a lot like the criticisms of Abu Dhabi and Brazil 2012, and Vettel’s overtaking abilities…

        Because I havn’t yet decided how much I ‘respect’ Button, though clearly I find him very likeable, all I’m trying to say is that playing devil’s advocate, surely all these critiques and arguments can be applied directly, perhaps more effectively, to your favourite driver?

    • mnmracer (@mnmracer) said on 28th April 2013, 19:34

      *facepalm*

  10. Young One said on 27th April 2013, 21:49

    One thing I noticed about Vettel is that he rides cars instead of driving them. He must set up his seats in a different way.

  11. James (@jaymz) said on 28th April 2013, 20:31

    3 week break nonsense.

  12. BasCB (@bascb) said on 29th April 2013, 8:38

    A lovely article about Rodrigez and Siffert! And yes, its great we don’t see drivers dying by the dozens a year.

  13. Howard (@howard) said on 29th April 2013, 11:38

    So PDR wants Mark’s Red Bull seat! His manager must have been the one who instigated the Porsche rumours.

    PDR should keep dreaming, no top team is interested in him.

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