2013 Spanish Grand Prix tyre strategies and pit stops

2013 Spanish Grand Prix

Fernando Alonso, Ferrari, Circuit de Cataunya, Barcelona, 2013Pit stop strategy dominated the Spanish Grand Prix with most drivers making four visits to the pits. There were 77 pit stops in total

Fernando Alonso enjoyed the quickest pit stop of the race when he made his final stop on lap 49. From pit entry to exit he took 18.471 seconds, almost a full second quicker than the quickest pit stop in last year’s race, which was also set by Ferrari.

The top 19 pit stops in this year’s race were all quicker than the fastest seen last year.

Spanish Grand Prix tyre strategies

The tyre strategies for each driver:

Stint 1 Stint 2 Stint 3 Stint 4 Stint 5 Stint 6
Fernando Alonso Medium (9) Hard (12) Hard (15) Medium (13) Hard (17)
Kimi Raikkonen Medium (10) Medium (16) Medium (19) Hard (21)
Felipe Massa Medium (8) Hard (12) Hard (16) Medium (15) Hard (15)
Sebastian Vettel Medium (10) Hard (14) Hard (15) Medium (12) Hard (15)
Mark Webber Medium (7) Hard (13) Hard (16) Medium (14) Hard (16)
Nico Rosberg Medium (10) Hard (17) Hard (20) Hard (19)
Paul di Resta Medium (9) Hard (10) Medium (19) Medium (15) Hard (13)
Jenson Button Medium (11) Hard (17) Hard (18) Hard (20)
Sergio Perez Medium (10) Hard (13) Hard (15) Medium (12) Hard (16)
Daniel Ricciardo Medium (10) Hard (14) Medium (15) Hard (12) Hard (14)
Esteban Gutierrez Medium (13) Medium (15) Hard (14) Medium (12) Hard (11)
Lewis Hamilton Medium (9) Hard (16) Hard (11) Medium (14) Hard (15)
Adrian Sutil Medium (8) Medium (14) Hard (14) Hard (13) Medium (16)
Pastor Maldonado Medium (8) Hard (12) Medium (15) Hard (18) Medium (12)
Nico Hulkenberg Medium (8) Medium (13) Hard (13) Hard (1) Hard (18) Medium (12)
Valtteri Bottas Medium (9) Hard (16) Hard (18) Medium (22)
Charles Pic Hard (8) Medium (15) Hard (18) Hard (24)
Jules Bianchi Hard (2) Hard (14) Hard (13) Medium (17) Hard (18)
Max Chilton Hard (15) Hard (15) Medium (17) Hard (17)
Jean-Eric Vergne Medium (9) Hard (11) Medium (14) Hard (3) Medium (15)
Giedo van der Garde Medium (9) Hard (11) Hard (1)
Romain Grosjean Medium (8)

Spanish Grand Prix pit stop times

How long each driver’s pit stops took:

Driver Team Pit stop time Gap On lap
1 Fernando Alonso Ferrari 18.471 49
2 Sebastian Vettel Red Bull 18.606 0.135 10
3 Sebastian Vettel Red Bull 18.694 0.223 51
4 Sebastian Vettel Red Bull 18.708 0.237 24
5 Jenson Button McLaren 18.810 0.339 11
6 Fernando Alonso Ferrari 18.909 0.438 9
7 Mark Webber Red Bull 18.931 0.460 50
8 Felipe Massa Ferrari 19.001 0.530 51
9 Mark Webber Red Bull 19.151 0.680 20
10 Mark Webber Red Bull 19.170 0.699 36
11 Jenson Button McLaren 19.196 0.725 28
12 Sergio Perez McLaren 19.250 0.779 10
13 Jenson Button McLaren 19.290 0.819 46
14 Esteban Gutierrez Sauber 19.324 0.853 54
15 Felipe Massa Ferrari 19.326 0.855 36
16 Nico Rosberg Mercedes 19.352 0.881 47
17 Felipe Massa Ferrari 19.373 0.902 20
18 Nico Hulkenberg Sauber 19.402 0.931 21
19 Nico Rosberg Mercedes 19.414 0.943 10
20 Lewis Hamilton Mercedes 19.457 0.986 50
21 Paul di Resta Force India 19.481 1.010 53
22 Felipe Massa Ferrari 19.490 1.019 8
23 Daniel Ricciardo Toro Rosso 19.498 1.027 39
24 Fernando Alonso Ferrari 19.519 1.048 36
25 Sebastian Vettel Red Bull 19.551 1.080 39
26 Adrian Sutil Force India 19.591 1.120 36
27 Mark Webber Red Bull 19.668 1.197 7
28 Lewis Hamilton Mercedes 19.700 1.229 36
29 Pastor Maldonado Williams 19.723 1.252 53
30 Kimi Raikkonen Lotus 19.743 1.272 26
31 Jean-Eric Vergne Toro Rosso 19.772 1.301 9
32 Paul di Resta Force India 19.792 1.321 19
33 Daniel Ricciardo Toro Rosso 19.795 1.324 10
34 Paul di Resta Force India 19.822 1.351 38
35 Jules Bianchi Marussia 19.830 1.359 46
36 Daniel Ricciardo Toro Rosso 19.857 1.386 51
37 Sergio Perez McLaren 19.866 1.395 38
38 Jules Bianchi Marussia 19.904 1.433 29
39 Valtteri Bottas Williams 19.908 1.437 43
40 Fernando Alonso Ferrari 19.952 1.481 21
41 Kimi Raikkonen Lotus 19.978 1.507 10
42 Esteban Gutierrez Sauber 19.988 1.517 28
43 Nico Hulkenberg Sauber 19.993 1.522 8
44 Sergio Perez McLaren 19.993 1.522 50
45 Nico Rosberg Mercedes 20.032 1.561 27
46 Esteban Gutierrez Sauber 20.082 1.611 42
47 Daniel Ricciardo Toro Rosso 20.100 1.629 24
48 Lewis Hamilton Mercedes 20.132 1.661 25
49 Kimi Raikkonen Lotus 20.184 1.713 45
50 Pastor Maldonado Williams 20.205 1.734 8
51 Adrian Sutil Force India 20.306 1.835 22
52 Nico Hulkenberg Sauber 20.314 1.843 53
53 Valtteri Bottas Williams 20.533 2.062 25
54 Sergio Perez McLaren 20.578 2.107 23
55 Paul di Resta Force India 20.615 2.144 9
56 Jules Bianchi Marussia 20.656 2.185 16
57 Jean-Eric Vergne Toro Rosso 20.671 2.200 20
58 Charles Pic Caterham 20.734 2.263 8
59 Pastor Maldonado Williams 20.800 2.329 35
60 Charles Pic Caterham 20.870 2.399 23
61 Valtteri Bottas Williams 21.171 2.700 9
62 Charles Pic Caterham 21.202 2.731 41
63 Max Chilton Marussia 21.340 2.869 47
64 Max Chilton Marussia 21.582 3.111 30
65 Giedo van der Garde Caterham 21.686 3.215 9
66 Lewis Hamilton Mercedes 22.018 3.547 9
67 Giedo van der Garde Caterham 22.029 3.558 20
68 Esteban Gutierrez Sauber 22.144 3.673 13
69 Nico Hulkenberg Sauber 22.324 3.853 34
70 Adrian Sutil Force India 22.931 4.460 49
71 Pastor Maldonado Williams 23.139 4.668 20
72 Nico Hulkenberg Sauber 24.001 5.530 35
73 Max Chilton Marussia 25.294 6.823 15
74 Jean-Eric Vergne Toro Rosso 25.362 6.891 34
75 Jean-Eric Vergne Toro Rosso 29.740 11.269 37
76 Jules Bianchi Marussia 29.994 11.523 2
77 Adrian Sutil Force India 74.026 55.555 8

2013 Spanish Grand Prix

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17 comments on 2013 Spanish Grand Prix tyre strategies and pit stops

  1. Fisha695 (@fisha695) said on 12th May 2013, 18:14

    Average medium stint = 12.17 laps, 56.65km (35.19mi), or 18.43% of the race.
    Average hard stint = 13.83 laps, 64.37km (39.99mi), or 20.95% of the race.

    • aldoG said on 12th May 2013, 21:24

      LOL. The fastest and most expensive cars in the world are going ahead with tyres that last, on average, 64 km (and that only if the drivers are told not to push…) Not sure if I should laugh or cry.

    • Timothy Katz (@timothykatz) said on 13th May 2013, 7:54

      Great arithmatic, but disappointing results.
      I wonder how much four pitstops and driving less rapidly to conserve the tyres actualy lengthen the race duration. I wonder is someone could compare the average lap time over the duration of the race (ie total time divided by laps) and compare it to a GP2 time.

      • Fisha695 (@fisha695) said on 13th May 2013, 8:45

        No idea about the GP2 time however here is the total race times going back to 2004 when they started running 66 laps instead of 65.
        2013 — 1:39:17.00
        2012 — 1:39:09.15
        2011 — 1:39:03.30
        2010 — 1:35:44.01
        2009 — 1:37:19.20
        2008 — 1:38:19.05
        2007 — 1:31:36.23
        2006 — 1:26:21.76
        2005 — 1:27:16.83
        2004 — 1:27:32.84

        This years race was 7.85 seconds slower/longer then last years race, while compared to the 2011 running it was 13.70 seconds slower/longer in total time.

        7.85 seconds over 66 laps works out to be 0.11893 seconds per lap slower/longer on average, so round up and you can say that this years race was 0.12 seconds slower/longer per lap then the 2012 running.

        • Timothy Katz (@timothykatz) said on 13th May 2013, 9:22

          I have to say I was expecting a lot more of a drop off this year. But I’m surprised that the race takes 12 minutes longer than it did in 2004.
          This year’s GP2 race was 41:59 over 26 laps, so average of 1:36.54 per lap. The average lap for this year’s F1 was 1:30.15.

          • AdrianMorse (@adrianmorse) said on 13th May 2013, 15:48

            @timothykatz, remember they didn’t have the chicane before the final corner in 2004, so those times are a little flattered. I think they put the chicane in for the 2008 season. The race times for the 2008 and 2009 season look a little slow, especially considering they had refuelling back then, but both those races saw a safety car.

            I think the difference between the 2010 race and the races in the Pirelli era is a nice illustration of the impact that degradable tyres have on race pace.

  2. Osvaldas31 (@osvaldas31) said on 12th May 2013, 18:14

    I’m amazed just how much as a top team Lotus loses to leaders during pit stops. They can’t afford that if they’re chasing championship glory.

    • Kimi4WDC said on 13th May 2013, 0:42

      This is going to bite hard in Monaco, where it is already nearly impossible to find free air to do the pit-stop, specially if a slow car leading the pack.

  3. andae23 (@andae23) said on 12th May 2013, 18:19

    Interesting to see that Raikonnen was able to replace Ferrari’s and Red Bull’s two hard stints with one medium stint: that Lotus is a really well built car.

  4. ME4ME (@me4me) said on 12th May 2013, 19:25

    Can’t help to think that many the teams got it wrong, and that the medium tyre actually was better for the race. It’s faster, but the difference in nr of laps isn’t that big.

  5. wsrgo (@wsrgo) said on 13th May 2013, 4:23

    Does anyone know what was Alonso’s stationary time for his final pitstop. With varying pitlane lengths, it’s difficult to compare cumulative pitstop times from circuit to circuit…

  6. Michael (@freelittlebirds) said on 13th May 2013, 16:10

    Looking at the pit stops, is it conclusive that 4 pit stops were the better strategy?

    I think that was the case just for the Ferraris.
    Rosberg on 3 pit stops managed to keep P6 as opposed to dropping further back. Raikonnen took P2. Red Bull must certainly regret not taking a chance on a 3 pit stop strategy for Vettel. Button leapfrogged Perez on the 3 pit stop strategy so it was the correct tyre strategy for the McLaren. Hamilton dropped to P12 on a 4 pit stop strategy.

    The only cars that benefited from a 4 pit stop strategy were the Ferraris BUT Alonso is saying that they were just lucky that the tyre deg happened to give them the pace to win. Slightly worse tyre deg and Raikonnen would have won it.

    • Mr win or lose said on 13th May 2013, 20:44

      4 pitstops were better in general, see for example Maldonado versus Bottas. Räikkönen only managed to get his 3-stop strategy work because of his extremely low tyre wear, although I think he too might have done better if he’d done a 4-stop strategy – he lost quite a bit behind Vettel before his second stop. Rosberg and Button did a good job nursing his tyres, but they were not particularly fast – their strategy at least made them less susceptible to traffic. It’s not strange that given the high tyre-wear rates (laptimes increasing by 4 seconds on worn tyres) and the relatively minor time losses in the pits, many teams (Red Bull and at least Sauber) changed their strategyfrom a 3-stop to a 4-stop.

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