Horner: Mercedes had “enormous & unfair advantage”

Christian Horner, Red Bull, Shanghai, 2013In the round-up: Red Bull team principal Christian Horner believes Mercedes broke the rules and gained an advantage with their tyre test.

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Test An Unfair Advantage For Mercedes, Says Horner (Speed)

“For any competitor to have the benefit of running a current car with current race drivers with tires that are to be used in the current world championship is an enormous and unfair advantage for both performance and reliability and in our opinion totally unacceptable.”

Ferrari: Mercedes test all that matters (Autosport)

Ferrari spokesperson: “The fundamental question refers to the compliance with article 22 of the sporting regulations, which does not allow the use of a current or previous year’s car for any kind of testing carried out during the season. This is the only substantial aspect. Everything else is irrelevant detail.”

F1 Owner Plots Bid For Sports Rights Giant (Sky)

“The part-owner of Formula One motor racing is plotting a $2bn-plus (??1.3bn-plus) takeover bid for IMG Worldwide, the media rights agency which represents the supermodel Heidi Klum and Novak Djokovic, the top-ranked tennis player.”

So street (Toro Rosso)

“Despite the cramped garages and the tiny hospitality areas floating on the Rowing Basin, the Circuit Gilles Villeneuve has character aplenty and if the weather is fine, it?s a great place to be, although of course the current forecast is for thunderstorms on Friday and Saturday and a sticky but dry 28 degrees [Celsius] on race day.”

McLaren and the Indy 500 (McLaren)

“Conquering the Indy 500 had become a burning priority for Bruce McLaren. He was a man who subscribed to the philosophy that if you?re not making forward progress then, like as not, you will drift backwards. By the start of the 1970s McLaren was an established force in F1 and even after they had recovered from the body blow of Bruce?s death testing a Can-Am car at Goodwood, his fellow directors continued to push forward to realise their boss?s ambitions.”

Formula one a sad, gimmick-laced parody (The Age)

“Rather than being the purest, most compelling form of motor sport on the planet, formula one has became a sad, gimmick-laced parody. Last Sunday’s Monaco Grand Prix, far from being a showcase of all that is noble and wonderful about the sport, was won with Nico Rosberg – the Mercedes cork in the bottle – heading a modestly paced parade of drivers and cars, all on tyre conservation strategies.”

Tweets

Comment of the day

As two teams may have broken the testing ban, @Mike-The-Bike-Schumacher doubts the FIA’s ability to enforce other complicated rules:

Remember when there was talk of a budget cap, well seems like the FIA can?t even police a non testing rule! Put’s policing a budget cap rule into perspective!
@Mike-The-Bike-Schumacher

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On this day in F1

McLaren team founder Bruce McLaren died on this day in 1970 while testing a Can-Am car at Goodwood. McLaren paid tribute to him ahead of the launch of their new F1 car earlier this year:

Image ?? Red Bull/Getty

98 thoughts on “Horner: Mercedes had “enormous & unfair advantage””

  1. Watching modern day formula one cars going around Monaco is nothing short of incredible. The cars have outgrown the track hence virtually no overtaking. It’s also dangerous but given its heritage will always stay on the calendar. Despite what people say about the tyres they still fly around that track.

  2. Please pay no respect to ‘The Age’ article. People in Australia have no clue whatsoever about Forumla 1 and what the sport entails. The majority of the Melbourne population attend the GP as a ‘thing-to-do’ and vest very little interest in the sport. They would rather be watching a local Carlton v Collingwood Aussie rules ‘football’ match. Our media is equally to blame and as ignorant and incompetent.

  3. The problem with F1 is that the FIA regards it as its business not to merely organize and run the sport, but to try to control the outcomes. This practice has a long history in F1, and everyone accepts it, but perhaps it’s time that changed.

    The exhaust blown diffuser in 2009 really was illegal under the regs – but it promised to upset the existing order in F1 and deliver a championship to a team other than Ferrari or McLaren, so Charlie Whiting signed off on it anyway. And that sort of thinking is dominant among the people in charge of putting on F1.

    I follow a number of different sports and in all of them except F1 it would a huge scandal if the governing body was trying to favor some contestants over others. To add insult to injury, F1 this season (and to some extent last season as well) is managing to combine the worst features of professional wrestling and a chess match: it’s managing to seem both fixed AND boring!

    I think it’s time the people running F1 took a leaf from other sports (I’m tempted to say “real” sports) and stopped trying to influence outcomes in a misguided effort to “put on a show”.

    1. Agree and disagree. Yes F1 is unique and benefits when one team/driver doesn’t keep winning all the time, so they’ll try to prevent that sometimes, and they always prefer that seasons wind down to the last WDC deciding race. And yes I too wish they would stop trying to influence the outcomes. But as much as I dislike these degrady tires and DRS, I think they were meant to do the opposite of ‘fixing’ the racing. They were meant to shake things up and give us more potential winners of both the races and the Championships. Unless you are trying to claim they are trying now to fix it in Mercedes favour, and that I do not believe. I think the biggest example of influencing outcomes occurred when they moved MS to Ferrari to end the WDC drought there post-Senna. Eventually they even had to stop that train. Most other sports require far far less equipment and money and are more about the athletes and are therefore much harder to influence outcomes, but F1 is it’ own unique world with their own bat and ball, that’s for sure.

      1. F1 is unique and benefits when one team/driver doesn’t keep winning all the time

        Why is F1 “unique”? It could be argued that football would benefit if Man United didn’t win the league so often – would the FA be justified in changing the size of the pitch, the composition of the ball etc to try to achieve that result?

        Yes, I know that it’s always been this way in F1 (though not as much as at present I think) but perhaps it’s time it ended. Even by the standards of other motor-sports the degree to which the FIA is involved with trying to influence the outcome in F1 is quite unusual. In this particular instance its efforts to tilt the playing field in a certain direction have had the (doubtless unintended) side-effect of ruining the racing.

        There are worse things than one team winning the title(s) a few years in a row and we’re seeing some of those worse things right now. And what if (Heaven forfend) Vettel wins again this year anyway? What travesty of sport will be inflicted on us next year in consequence as the FIA goes to ever greater lengths to stop him?

        The cure here is much worse than the disease.

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