2013 Hungarian GP tyre strategies and pit stops

2013 Hungarian Grand Prix

Kimi Raikkonen, Lotus, Hungaroring, 2013Three-stop strategies were the order of the day for most drivers in Hungary. But once again Lotus used their car’s ability to look after its tyres to make one fewer stop and gain places.

Kimi Raikkonen exploited a two-stop strategy to move up from sixth in the opening stages to finish second.

During his final, 28-lap stint he was able to keep Sebastian Vettel behind despite the Red Bull driver’s tyres being 13 laps fresher.

Both McLaren drivers also used two-stop strategies. However Sam Michael later said they would have preferred to run a three-stop strategy for Jenson Button, which would have been quicker, but there were few chances to bring him into the pits and get him out again in clear air.

Another driver who made a two-stop strategy work was Nico Hulkenberg, including a 34-lap stint at the end of the race (one lap short of half the total distance), in a car which previously had severe trouble with rear tyre degradation.

For the seventh time in ten races Red Bull performed the fastest pit stop.

Hungarian Grand Prix tyre strategies

The tyre strategies for each driver:

Stint 1 Stint 2 Stint 3 Stint 4
Lewis Hamilton Soft (9) Medium (22) Medium (19) Medium (20)
Kimi Raikkonen Soft (13) Medium (29) Medium (28)
Sebastian Vettel Soft (11) Medium (23) Medium (21) Medium (15)
Mark Webber Medium (23) Medium (20) Medium (16) Soft (11)
Fernando Alonso Soft (12) Medium (22) Medium (14) Medium (22)
Romain Grosjean Soft (13) Medium (12) Medium (22) Medium (23)
Jenson Button Medium (24) Soft (13) Medium (33)
Felipe Massa Soft (11) Medium (20) Medium (17) Medium (22)
Sergio Perez Medium (23) Soft (15) Medium (31)
Pastor Maldonado Soft (9) Medium (19) Medium (23) Medium (18)
Nico Hulkenberg Soft (11) Medium (24) Medium (34)
Jean-Eric Vergne Soft (8) Medium (22) Medium (20) Medium (19)
Daniel Ricciardo Soft (10) Medium (28) Medium (31)
Giedo van der Garde Soft (8) Medium (19) Medium (17) Medium (24)
Charles Pic Soft (13) Medium (25) Medium (30)
Jules Bianchi Medium (20) Soft (13) Medium (13) Medium (21)
Max Chilton Medium (21) Soft (13) Medium (16) Medium (17)
Paul di Resta Soft (9) Medium (17) Medium (22) Medium (18)
Nico Rosberg Soft (10) Medium (19) Medium (19) Medium (16)
Valtteri Bottas Soft (10) Medium (23) Medium (9)
Esteban Gutierrez Medium (23) Medium (5)
Adrian Sutil Medium (19)

Hungarian Grand Prix pit stop times

How long each driver’s pit stops took:

Driver Team Pit stop time Gap On lap
1 Sebastian Vettel Red Bull 21.343 11
2 Lewis Hamilton Mercedes 21.454 0.111 31
3 Fernando Alonso Ferrari 21.599 0.256 12
4 Felipe Massa Ferrari 21.612 0.269 48
5 Kimi Raikkonen Lotus 21.643 0.300 42
6 Sebastian Vettel Red Bull 21.666 0.323 55
7 Felipe Massa Ferrari 21.753 0.410 31
8 Fernando Alonso Ferrari 21.753 0.410 48
9 Mark Webber Red Bull 21.762 0.419 23
10 Lewis Hamilton Mercedes 21.840 0.497 9
11 Nico Rosberg Mercedes 21.854 0.511 48
12 Sebastian Vettel Red Bull 21.863 0.520 34
13 Pastor Maldonado Williams 21.880 0.537 28
14 Daniel Ricciardo Toro Rosso 21.996 0.653 38
15 Nico Rosberg Mercedes 22.015 0.672 10
16 Mark Webber Red Bull 22.022 0.679 59
17 Valtteri Bottas Williams 22.023 0.680 10
18 Romain Grosjean Lotus 22.054 0.711 13
19 Pastor Maldonado Williams 22.103 0.760 9
20 Jenson Button McLaren 22.107 0.764 24
21 Lewis Hamilton Mercedes 22.136 0.793 50
22 Jules Bianchi Marussia 22.159 0.816 20
23 Kimi Raikkonen Lotus 22.161 0.818 13
24 Jules Bianchi Marussia 22.221 0.878 33
25 Fernando Alonso Ferrari 22.249 0.906 34
26 Romain Grosjean Lotus 22.267 0.924 25
27 Jean-Eric Vergne Toro Rosso 22.282 0.939 30
28 Max Chilton Marussia 22.301 0.958 34
29 Nico Hulkenberg Sauber 22.303 0.960 11
30 Max Chilton Marussia 22.323 0.980 21
31 Sergio Perez McLaren 22.323 0.980 23
32 Mark Webber Red Bull 22.349 1.006 43
33 Giedo van der Garde Caterham 22.384 1.041 44
34 Esteban Gutierrez Sauber 22.425 1.082 23
35 Charles Pic Caterham 22.450 1.107 38
36 Romain Grosjean Lotus 22.451 1.108 47
37 Charles Pic Caterham 22.465 1.122 13
38 Jenson Button McLaren 22.496 1.153 37
39 Nico Hulkenberg Sauber 22.606 1.263 35
40 Valtteri Bottas Williams 22.612 1.269 33
41 Nico Rosberg Mercedes 22.628 1.285 29
42 Sergio Perez McLaren 22.722 1.379 38
43 Paul di Resta Force India 22.723 1.380 26
44 Jean-Eric Vergne Toro Rosso 22.745 1.402 8
45 Paul di Resta Force India 22.754 1.411 9
46 Giedo van der Garde Caterham 22.831 1.488 27
47 Felipe Massa Ferrari 23.012 1.669 11
48 Paul di Resta Force India 23.027 1.684 48
49 Jules Bianchi Marussia 23.030 1.687 46
50 Giedo van der Garde Caterham 23.200 1.857 8
51 Max Chilton Marussia 23.257 1.914 50
52 Jean-Eric Vergne Toro Rosso 23.756 2.413 50
53 Daniel Ricciardo Toro Rosso 24.033 2.690 10
54 Pastor Maldonado Williams 24.796 3.453 51

2013 Hungarian Grand Prix

Browse all 2013 Hungarian Grand Prix articles

Image ?? Lotus/LAT

Advert | Go Ad-free

6 comments on 2013 Hungarian GP tyre strategies and pit stops

  1. andae23 (@andae23) said on 28th July 2013, 22:00

    Strange to see the change of minds at Lotus: their first stints were exactly the same, but then Grosjean did a very short stint while Raikkonen just kept on going. Grosjean got stuck behind JB and Vettel in his second stint, but the decision to then bring him in earlier was one I doubted as soon as I saw him coming in. Why didn’t he just drop back from Vettel to prevent overheating and just a 2-stop like Raikkonen did?

    On a different note: looking at the Caterham, Pic did a 2-stop while Van der Garde did a 3-stop, but in contrast to the front of the field (Button and Raikkonen), a 2-stop didn’t work out for Pic, even though he said he didn’t have any problems.

    • Chris (@tophercheese21) said on 29th July 2013, 4:15

      but then Grosjean did a very short stint while Raikkonen just kept on going.

      When I saw him come in so early, I thought it might have been Lotus just trying to apologise to the stewards for his move on Button.

      In hind sight it might have been better to just take the drive through for it because a drive through is quicker than a pitstop.

    • Mr win or lose said on 29th July 2013, 23:21

      Lotus pulled in Grosjean early to cover Button, but it didn’t work out very well. Strangely, all teams decided to use the medium tyres for the majority of the race, even though the tyre-wear levels seemed rather low, while the soft tyre was almost a second a lap faster.

  2. Mike Dee (@mike-dee) said on 28th July 2013, 22:05

    Pretty good pit stops all around. No major issues at all, which is rare.

  3. arki19 said on 30th July 2013, 4:17

    Does anyone have a theory as to why McLaren went for the soft tyres on the second stint? It would make sense to leave them for when car is lighter at the end of the race surely?
    Also, why did Vettel have such difficulty getting past Button when Hamilton achieved that feat very quickly? Aero, engines, set up??
    I would like to think it was engine – but then nothing seems to be decided by who’s got the best/ most powerful/ efficient engine anymore. (tyres, tyres, tyres…)
    Maybe this is why F1 fails to attract more of the major car manufacturers world wide.

Add your comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

All comments must abide by the comment policy. Comments may be moderated.
Want to post off-topic? Head to the forum.
See the FAQ for more information.