Montezemolo rebukes Alonso for critical comments

2013 F1 season

Fernando Alonso, Ferrari, Nurburgring, 2013Ferrari president Luca di Montezemolo has rebuked Fernando Alonso for comments the team disapproved of.

According to a report on the team’s website, Montezemolo told Alonso: “All the great champions who have driven for Ferrari have always been asked to put the interests of the team above their own.”

“This is the moment to stay calm, avoid polemics and show humility and determination in making one?s own contribution, standing alongside the team and its people both at the track and outside it.”

Alonso’s comments, believed to have been critical of the team’s recent performance, “did not go down well with Montezemolo, nor with anyone in the team” according to Ferrari. Alonso’s manager was also observed talking to Red Bull team principal Christian Horner during the weekend, provoking speculation Alonso is trying to switch teams.

Earlier today Ferrari announced the hiring of former Lotus technical director James Allison who worked with Alonso during his championship-winning years at Renault.

Montezemolo told team principal Stefano Domenicali, “the Ferrari I saw in yesterday?s race doesn?t sit well with me” at a meeting with the team’s engineers.

The report added: “Montezemolo did not mince his words when it came to asking the team to step up a gear. Each one of the engineers present received a ‘gift’ of a knife, along with an invitation ?ǣ metaphorical up to a point ?ǣ to put it between their teeth when thinking how to tackle the second half of the season.”

The Ferrari article pinned the blame for the team’s recent downturn in performance on the alterations made to the tyres following the failures seen at the British Grand Prix:

“Pirelli’s choice contributed to artificially altering the hierarchy in the field, something that has not pleased the president or the men of the Scuderia. This topic will be the subject of further debate in the near future.”

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193 comments on Montezemolo rebukes Alonso for critical comments

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  1. Candice said on 29th July 2013, 17:55

    hahaha, dont mess with the old dog.

    I remember Kimi used to curse the mechanic that interrupt his PR session for trying to get him to LDM ‘s office but Kimi refused and said a few “nice words”.

    And we know what happened next.

    • TMF (@tmf42) said on 29th July 2013, 19:31

      I believe LDM also sacked Schumacher for Kimi.
      Anyway Kimi / Massa rode the wave, but Ferrari started to fall apart after MSC, Brawn and Todt left.
      Stefano seems like a nice guy but he doesn’t know how to handle LDM like Jean Todt did – there was micro-management going on before but Todt understood to throw LDM a bone he could chew on for the critical moments and leave the team alone. At least that’s how it appeared to an interested outsider like me.

    • jimscreechy (@) said on 29th July 2013, 19:58

      I worry when drivers have to be so tight lipped they can’t make a quip without being rebuked. I think his comments were very off-the-cuff and meant without criticism or malice, but now we have Luca effectively biting his head off. All to often we have meaningles inteviews with absolutely no insight on what drivers are going through, their thoughts or opinions as they tow the PR line in an attempt to remain corporately responsible. The PR and compliance demands grow, and true opinion is burried in sound bites and sponsorship acknowledgements. I suppose its the price we pay as fans for teams having to fork out for such large salaries. A million pounds buys a lot of conformity these days… God, forbid someone should pay me 20 million pounds to shut up and follow orders; I’d probably never speak again.

    • Baron (@baron) said on 29th July 2013, 22:52

      Don’t forget what happened to Alain Prost! There can’t be many World Champions who have been fired mid season at Ferrari – but we may soon witness another. If Enzo had still been alive, Alonso would have been strapped to the roller of a tarmac laying machine and be sleeping with the fishes after tea…

  2. andae23 (@andae23) said on 29th July 2013, 17:56

    So… Ferrari and Alonso have consistently talked down their performance for the last four years… and Alonso gets rebuked?

    Jean Alesi springs to mind

    • Meander (@meander) said on 29th July 2013, 18:02

      Actually, Alain Prost ’91 comes to mind.

      Maybe Alonso is *trying* to get himself fired ;)

      • andae23 (@andae23) said on 29th July 2013, 18:05

        epic fail… I was thinking about Pirelli and Ferrari and for some reason I wrote down Alesi :P

      • erix said on 30th July 2013, 13:08

        Absolutely, as Alain Prost fired he moved to Williams SUPERCAR and win 93 F1 with one eye needed only. Teflonso want to be fired so he can move to other team without paying penalties for early termination.

    • Candice said on 29th July 2013, 18:12

      The message can be understood as

      ” i know what game you are trying to play Alonso, and im not gonna tolerate any politician game of yous anymore”

      The only loser from these silly rumors is Ferrari. LDM is smart guy, he gonna stop the bleed before it get any worse.

  3. Max Jacobson (@vettel1) said on 29th July 2013, 17:57

    Pirelli’s choice contributed to artificially altering the hierarchy in the field, something that has not pleased the president or the men of the Scuderia. This topic will be the subject of further debate in the near future

    Would you rather that or have farcical races which pose a huge danger to the drivers? I suppose actually you would prefer farcical races, judging by your ‘opportunist’ decision to participate in the farce that was the 2005 USGP.

    • electrolite (@electrolite) said on 29th July 2013, 18:03

      Might be mistaken, as I missed Silverstone (that’s the real reason all that happened, the one race I miss!) – but wasn’t Massa one of the casualties of that?

      • Max Jacobson (@vettel1) said on 29th July 2013, 18:21

        @electrolite indeed he was, which kind of makes it confusing that they wouldn’t respect the change was made out of a safety concern. If I recall correctly Alonso also suffered from a slow puncture but I may be confusing that with the Spanish GP.

        • electrolite (@electrolite) said on 29th July 2013, 18:26

          I’d argue Pirelli rectified the safety issues (totally agree with that) and then went one step ahead in making the tyres more conservative (changes as well as the kevlar construction). And Luca’s right, you can’t deny the order of field changed with that.

          But who can blame Pirelli… would’ve have been really bad for them if we had another Silverstone.

          • Max Jacobson (@vettel1) said on 29th July 2013, 18:51

            @electrolite I think the construction change was definitely necessary in time for Belgium because the original steel belted tyres would’ve just crumbled under the loads put through them in Eau Rouge. What wasn’t necessary was a compound change and so Pirelli didn’t change them, so really they’ve done the best they can to not influence the championship too heavily.

            Undoubtably it has had an effect but it was largely unavoidable and really they don’t have any justification for complaining. Safety is paramount.

          • DM0407 (@dm0407) said on 29th July 2013, 19:19

            I could have sworn I saw somewhere that Ferrari was one of the teams tipped to benefit from this change?

            And if they are so much easier on their tires compared to other teams, then how come they were unable run a two stopper like Kimi? They were allowed the same amount of testing and could potentially found the same gains as any other team.

            Had they won, I’m sure there would be no complaints. Mercedes I expect would have been very vocal had they not done so well. They forfeited testing time (rightfully) before it was known it would become a tire test.

          • electrolite (@electrolite) said on 29th July 2013, 19:27

            Had they won, I’m sure there would be no complaints.

            Yes, obviously, but they didn’t win…they didn’t even come close!

            And if they are so much easier on their tires compared to other teams, then how come they were unable run a two stopper like Kimi?

            Fair point…I think if we’d seen a softer compound they would have faired better. Watching Ferrari’s onboards this weekend, it’s almost as if the tyres weren’t even hot enough – front end in particular not turning in like it should.

            Ferrari were expecting to do well in Hungary, judging by how they kept tyre temps good in the past.

          • DM0407 (@dm0407) said on 29th July 2013, 20:03

            OK I guess I stated the obvious on that one.. I guess I meant to say that it’s funny how they complain after the race and not when the tire change was first ratified.

            After Indy 05 and yesterday we at least know he’s consistent about making mid season changes on behalf of safety!

          • Optimaximal (@optimaximal) said on 30th July 2013, 10:24

            I think the construction change was definitely necessary in time for Belgium because the original steel belted tyres would’ve just crumbled under the loads put through them in Eau Rouge.

            They definite would have if the teams persisted in swapping them and collapsing the one-directional belt… The problem is, so many small knee-jerk changes were made for Germany that we don’t know which ones actually solved the problem.

          • @DM0407 : @vettel1 and I have discussed that endlessly but according to Paul Hembery there never was safety issue with the delaminations prior to Silverstone when it was investigated down to swapping of the rears and running lower than Pirelli’s directed minimum pressure as the real cause.

            If it was decided that the steel belts were too weak; why would they need to change so many other things?

            Sure you have seen that Ferrari would be one of the teams to benefit from the change because all kinds of people have been making all kinds of claims back and forth. And surely Kimi made it through a two-stopper but the fact of the matter is that Ferrari and Lotus handled tire wear better than the rest. Now we have less tire wear and Ferrari and Lotus are at a disadvantage compared to earlier whether they are still doing well or not.

            Mercedes is whole different story. Clearly they have benefited immensely from the test which they are trying to play down so hard and honestly hope they will not make more impact on the title fight.

    • Sam Sam said on 29th July 2013, 20:25

      It was a farce because all teams running Michelin thought that because their tires can’t take the load at max speed around the final bend, all others should run slower as well. Remember there was a competition between Mich and Bridg and the former got it wrong on that occasion.

      • joebloggs said on 30th July 2013, 1:11

        Yes, Michelin “got it wrong” but that was only half the story. The track had been resurfaced with a more grippy asphalt, and neither Michelin nor Bridgestone were allowed to test their tyres on the new surface. But Bridgestone’s subsidiary, Firestone, made tyres for the Indycar series and had done substantial running on the new surface for that series. Bridgestone therefore had a massive knowledge advantage. There was no other turn at any other track similar to Indy’s Turn 13 and so Michelin simply had no data on which to base its tyres. Following two blowouts at Turn 13 it deemed its tyres unsafe and would not allow the teams to race at full speeds through that turn.
        It makes the principle of not allowing the tyre supplier to properly test its tyres seem ludicrous – the recent Mercedes/Pirelli mess being a great example of putting politics over safety.

  4. electrolite (@electrolite) said on 29th July 2013, 17:59

    Pirelli’s choice contributed to artificially altering the hierarchy in the field

    I do agree. Out of the top teams, Ferrari seem to have lost out the most. They had genuine pace… although I’ll be told I’m wrong by anyone who dislikes Ferrarii on that one.

    Each one of the engineers present received a ‘gift’ of a knife, along with an invitation – metaphorical up to a point – to put it between their teeth when thinking how to tackle the second half of the season.”

    That is so Ferrari…

  5. sdtaylor91 (@sdtaylor91) said on 29th July 2013, 18:02

    Alonso has been patient enough. He’s waited 3 and a half seasons for the team to catch Red Bull and they seem incapable of doing it. They started the year with perhaps the best all rounder in terms of tyre life/race pace vs. quali pace and now they’re clearly 4th quickest.

    • dimitris said on 29th July 2013, 18:20

      Alonso had his chances to win the WDC with Ferrari on two occassions. In 2010 Ferrari was quite competitive but he blew it by waiting for Vettel to run into misfortune. The title was his, had he assumed a normal posture in the race, i.e. fight for the win rather than play for the points or wait for the other guy to blow an engine. The view that he lost it because of wrong strategy adopted by the team does not hold, because he did not make a single attempt to pass the slower Renault, driven by a rookie. Last year, when Ferrari was indeed below Red Bull his performance was excellent, but when Ferrari was at par with Red Bull in the last races, and both were behind Maclaren, his performance dropped and he was slower than Massa and Vettel and lost the title.

      • panache (@panache) said on 29th July 2013, 21:53

        The view that he lost it because of wrong strategy adopted by the team does not hold, because he did not make a single attempt to pass the slower Renault, driven by a rookie.

        This is just plainly not true.

        • Jon Sandor (@jonsan) said on 29th July 2013, 23:13

          It plainly is true, if you look at the lap time data from Abu Dhabi. But in truth it should never have come down to that. Alonso made numerous mistakes all year long which cost him points.

          • Mike (@mike) said on 30th July 2013, 3:24

            No it isn’t, even now I can clearly remember Alonso doing all he can to pass him. Simply put, it wasn’t in his control.

          • jimscreechy (@) said on 30th July 2013, 10:43

            Sorry, I concur with Mike on this one, what you so “clearly remember” is clearly being clouded by your opinion, perhaps your inclination towards your favourite team, not to mention a foggy memory. Not only was Alonso trying his best to pass, he was on the radio ‘clearly’ making his thoughts on the matter known. Also! this incident was actually one of the defining moments of the season that prompted the FIA to adopt McLaren’s F-Duct into the now sanitised version for overtaking as DRS we have today.

        • Nathan (@il-ferrarista) said on 30th July 2013, 8:11

          +1

      • Oblong_Cheese (@oblong_cheese) said on 30th July 2013, 0:04

        because he did not make a single attempt to pass the slower Renault, driven by a rookie

        You and I obviously did not watch the same race as one of the main focal points of the race – that FOM spent a large percentage of time on – was the fact that Alonso tried and failed multiple times to pass Petrov.

      • yuya (@john-locke) said on 30th July 2013, 1:29

        I think Vettel and Alonso both did good job in 2010.
        But you are too harsh to Alonso. he had to fight for wins from 2nd row and 3rd row.
        Simply,F10 was slower than RB6. (I don’t mean Vettel didn’t deserve.)

    • GP1 said on 29th July 2013, 18:34

      But Fernando is the best car developer on the field ?? Much better than lazy Kimi was..three and years should be enough to prove his ability..

    • Ron Mon (@henslayer) said on 29th July 2013, 18:43

      Yep, Fernando consistently puts the car two or three places above where it would end up on its technical merit alone. He’s been shouldering the load while the designers and engineers continue to produce sub-par machinery. Is anyone really surprised that he is finally showing the frustration that he has surely been feeling for quite some time?

      Hiring James Allison as Chassis Technical Director is a step in the right direction, but it’s pretty late in the game for him to make a big contribution to the 2014 car. Their one real hope at this point is that Rory Byrne was able to inject some intellectual mojo into next year’s design.

  6. Jimbo Hull (@kartingjimbo) said on 29th July 2013, 18:03

    Daddys not happy with you Alonso, now go sit in the corner and think about what you said while I address my many followers. Ferrari does well to make it’s inner workings look like a strict cult.

  7. Eddie (@wackyracer) said on 29th July 2013, 18:03

    Let the games begin!

    Guess Luca is a bit bad his star driver talks to RedBull

  8. “…put the interests of the team above their own…”

    Good luck with that one.
    There is not one of the top drivers who thinks that way – which is one of the reasons they are the top drivers.

    • Girts (@girts) said on 29th July 2013, 18:56

      @nigel1 I couldn’t agree more. Ferrari cannot change the mindset of their drivers, just like no other team can. The claim that Ferrari drivers always put the team first is as serious as the claim that some of the teams are in F1 to have fun and don’t care about race wins.

      • Optimaximal (@optimaximal) said on 30th July 2013, 10:33

        It’s Ferrari getting caught up on their own myth.

        Just as ALO (or in actual fact, his manager) is prospecting Red Bull, there’s no doubt that Ferrari are waiting for the time to pounce on Sebastian Vettel. Everyone just wants to win and will do whatever it takes, even if that constitutes ‘waiting for contracts to expire’.

  9. cduk_mugello (@cduk_mugello) said on 29th July 2013, 18:09

    This is why I love Ferrari; nobody is bigger than the team. Alain Prost learnt that the hard way. Let’s see how Alonso reacts now. Whilst he’s a more mature driver nowadays, it’s difficult to forget his little outburst after Indy 2006 at the Renault team.

    • Nick (@npf1) said on 29th July 2013, 18:15

      I wonder if LdM felt he had to push out Schumacher for Raikkonen because of his comments on the 2005 and 2006 cars. I kind of imagined there would be more bashing when Schumacher retired last year with all the sour grapes in 2010.

    • Steph (@stephanief1990) said on 29th July 2013, 19:59

      @cduk_mugello I love Ferrari for that reason too but I don’t know what on earth LdM is on about. Alonso hasn’t said anything harsh or out of order despite Ferrari’s troubles with their cars since he joined the team.

    • Peter (@malaclypse) said on 29th July 2013, 22:11

      This is why I love Ferrari; nobody is bigger than the team.

      That sounds very romantic, but you can’t deny that Alonso is bigger than the current Ferrari.

      • cduk_mugello (@cduk_mugello) said on 29th July 2013, 22:49

        @malaclypse I disagree, Alonso is just a driver whereas Ferrari are much more. Similarly, the Schumacher of ’96-’99 was no bigger than the team (those years kind of mirror Alonso’s predicament now). And in my opinion Schumacher was a much greater driver than Alonso.

        • Nick (@npf1) said on 30th July 2013, 0:05

          I’m going to have to disagree there. Schumacher had a poor car in 1996 and he looked underway to finishing behind Alesi and Ferrari behind Benetton for a large part of the season, but in the following 3 years he had the pace to challenge for the title and Ferrari did everything they could (successfully) to close the gap to the dominant team. There was a much smaller number of failed developments, firing of people and all that.

          Compared to any era of Schumacher-led-Ferrari, the team from 2010 on seems to be in shambles.

          • Sankalp Sharma (@sankalp88) said on 30th July 2013, 6:41

            @npf1

            “…but in the following 3 years he had the pace to challenge for the title and Ferrari did everything they could (successfully) to close the gap to the dominant team”.

            Wait what??!! Did you even watch 97,98,99. Even in 2000 I would argue, that on balance Hakkinen’s Mclaren was better. But first things first: Villeneuve and Frentzen pretty much had Schumi covered on raw pace almost every race. Schu won 5 races due to sheer skill and some bad luck for Villenueve. Spa and Canada are good examples of that. Not only that, just see any on-board of Schu or Irvine that season. The F310B was a handful to drive. Yes, it was better than the rest and better than its predecessor, but a clear second to Williams. It still amazes me that Schumacher drove that dog of a car to almost a championship. F310B was after all Barnard’s design :/

            Next 98. I will concede that Ferrari were better off in this season, but on outright pace Mclaren were miles ahead. Most of the races Schumacher won were due to excellent skill and strategy (Hungary 98!!) and some bad luck on Hakkinen and Coulthard’s part (Monza 98?!). Although it still bothers me that Schumi choked in Suzuka that year and then arguably produced one of the drives of the season.

            99, well let’s leave this one. Ferrari were perhaps on balance equal. But we will never find out because Irvine was clearly not on Hakkinen’s level and that is when the Finn had had the most ridiculous year ever.

          • Nick (@npf1) said on 30th July 2013, 12:56

            First of all, what’s with the attitude? I started watching in 1998, which you could have found on my profile. I also own a ton of books on F1 in the 90s, but it’s entirely possible for me to draw a different conclusion. There is no need to be upset.

            They were successful in introducing updates that closed the gap a little. I’m not at all saying they had Newey’s designs covered. Ferrari right now seem to be unable to introduce successful updates, as opposed to the Ferrari of 97-2006 which managed to improve the car over the season without any issue or contract termination.

            When Ferrari was miles behind at the beginning of the season with Schumacher, they crawled back, with the exception of 2005. In 1996, they started off behind Benetton in terms of pace and never got up to Williams’ speed. In 1997, they made the gap to Williams smaller over the season, even if the car wasn’t that good, it was a lot better than the F310 or the F2005. (Or the B197, for that matter.) The F300 started off a second or so behind the McLaren, but Schumacher’s wins were a lot less lucky than in 1996 and 1997, and don’t forget Schumacher was passing Hakkinen as DC retired at Monza. Hakkinen and McLaren basically won the championship at the Ring, though.

            If anything, 1998 shows what this year should be in terms of catching up. Spa and Suzuka that year made the championship a signed deal, but it would have gone down the wire if DC kept out of Schumacher’s way and Schumacher didn’t stall the engine.

            1999 was a strange season, but when you look at Schumacher’s consistency in 1998 and 2000, I think he would have beaten Hakkinen despite Ferrari’s slumps (Schumacher was a major influence in the car’s development as well, so one could argue the slump would have been less if he didn’t break his leg as well). Irvine winning races with that car shows the potential of the F399, while McLaren had an off-year in terms of reliability and Hakkinen crashed more than in his early years.

            My conclusion is; Ferrari were better at getting closer to the front and improve a car back then. Not that they were on the Newey-teams’ level. @sankalp8

            (Mind you; I’m not disrespecting Newey, Williams, McLaren, Hakkinen, Villeneuve or Hill, but for the sake of post-length, just referring to Newey is easier.)

    • Hamilfan (@hamilfan) said on 30th July 2013, 5:41

      @cduk_mugello I can’t agree with you there at all . Both factors are important . The team provides the good car and the driver wins the races . It’s always a balance between the two . Alonso is clearly getting frustrated about the lack of working upgrades to his car and entitled to do so as it is a ferrari ,not a red soap box . It’s not the first year this has happened either . Considering Alonso has so far always spoken the “team line ” and came ever so close to winning the title with not the best car around in 2012 , Alonso is more important to Ferrari than Ferrari to Alonso at the moment . This is so if you wan’t to really win championships . If you want to race for fun and keep gloating about how ferrari has the best history , then yeah .

  10. Saints (@saints) said on 29th July 2013, 18:10

    Things are heating up. Alonso to Red Bull doesn’t sound so unrealistic imo.

    And if Alonso leaves, Ferrari should insta sign Nico Hülkenberg

    • electrolite (@electrolite) said on 29th July 2013, 18:20

      In that instance, I think a whole new roster altogether would be a healthy move… although I would suggest Massa performs so much better as a no.1 driver in a team (alright, he wasn’t really no.1 in 2008, but he might as well have been), a line up like Hulkenberg and even Di Resta would be solid. Those two would definitely bring points home, given a quick car – but Ferrari would want at least one proven race winner, which is where they might have to break their stubbornness.

      • dimitris said on 30th July 2013, 6:18

        He was indeed the no. 1 driver in 2008 by Domenicalli’s own admission. He said in an interview that Massa was given no 1 status because he helped Kimi to win the WDC in 2007, so it was his turn to win the WDC in 2008. Apparently it was Montezemolo’s decision to punish Kimi for not being a 9 to 5 company employee. Massa was given the third car, remember, at that time teams had three cars, his feedback only was taken into account for the development of the car, he and Kimi had opposite driving styles so Kimi could do nothing to bring the car to his own style, and insiders say that Kimi was not provided with the same equipment and with an understeering car.

  11. Kneyfield (@kneyfield) said on 29th July 2013, 18:10

    I can understand Alonso’s frustration and it’s no surprise or secret, that his patience has been wearing thin in the recent past.

    He should learn however, that not everyone can be as lucky as Räikkönen to win a title in his first Ferrari season. Even Schumacher needed five seasons until his first success with the Italian team.

    • Candice said on 29th July 2013, 18:14

      i don’t think Kimi was lucky.

      That year was truly complex with mclaren utilizing F2007 data and also got inside information from nigel stephney to get Kimi’s setup data, fuel level and strategy plan.

      To counter those deficit and win the title in the end is by no mean an easy feet.

    • Lari (@lari) said on 29th July 2013, 18:37

      And that’s what’s bothering Alonso, afterwall he was bought in (Raikkonen was bought out, however you want to look at it) with big money and all the hopes in the world and yet, after 3 full seasons he hasn’t done it yet and this year isn’t looking too good either.

    • Kimi4WDC said on 30th July 2013, 1:32

      Raikkonen, lucky and Alonso in one sentence is a bit of too much. How many “thank you” notes do you think Alonso sent to Mercedes for his 2005 Championship?

  12. Nick (@npf1) said on 29th July 2013, 18:10

    And so it begun! I can already read the headlines at gossip and conspiracy F1 blogs about Alonso getting fired, taking a sabbatical, going with Red Bull for 1 season in 2015 to win that final title and then retire.

    If Ferrari fires Alonso, I’ll honestly renounce my tifosi faith and give all my Ferrari related stuff to charity. That’s how done I am with the prancing horse by now.

  13. Deej92 (@deej92) said on 29th July 2013, 18:12

    Happy birthday Fernando ;)

  14. Keith Collantine (@keithcollantine) said on 29th July 2013, 18:15

    Remarkable stuff. I doubt any other team would put an article on their website saying ‘the president rang up our top driver on his birthday and ordered him to get back on-message, then handed a bunch of knives to our engineers and told them to stick them in their mouths’!

    • Jimbo Hull (@kartingjimbo) said on 29th July 2013, 18:19

      Haha amen. All the engineers will turn up to the next race looking like The Joker.

    • US_Peter (@us_peter) said on 29th July 2013, 18:49

      @keithcollantine It’s hardly surprising though. There’s something in the water in Maranello. Can’t wait to see how Alonso responds, if at all. He doesn’t seem like the kind of guy who will take it lying down. I’d be curious to know if Alonso was given a knife as well…

    • Kisii (@kisii) said on 29th July 2013, 18:51

      I just looooove how nut Ferrari can be…it’s a wonderful juxtaposition of an old school mindset in cutting-edge technology environs!

    • bull mello (@bullmello) said on 29th July 2013, 19:23

      Ferrari is certainly living up to their reputation. You can’t make this stuff up.

      @keithcollantine – What comments did Alonso make? All I’ve seen this season is along the lines of we need to do better, etc. Does Montezemolo think Alonso should be complacent or happy about the way things are going? The man wants to win.

      The only thing that comes to mind is the Alonso to RBR rumors. Guess the intrigue of the silly season is officially on the front burner now.

      • Broom (@brum55) said on 29th July 2013, 21:18

        When asked what he wanted for his birthday, Alonso responded: “Someone else’s car”, according to the BBC report. No surprise Ferrari reacted strongly. Remember only LDM is allowed to express anger at his team’s failings.
        To the naughty step Fernando!

        • Adrian J (@adrian-j) said on 29th July 2013, 22:43

          The report I read quoted it as “a faster car” which could be taken many ways…

          …it would appear that LDM has taken it as meaning an RB10 :-p

          • bull mello (@bullmello) said on 29th July 2013, 23:43

            Thanks for the replies. Sounds like Alonso and Montezemolo are both frustrated. Alonso has a much better sense of humor. Montezemolo has none. He could have/should have said that he shares Fernando’s frustration and that he also wants to win. Let’s fix the problems that are keeping us from winning! But, that is what a normal, reasonable, stable person might say…

    • Bleeps_and_Tweaks (@bleeps_and_tweaks) said on 29th July 2013, 20:36

      @Keithcollantine – The stunt with the knives is an incredible bit of ‘man management’!! Has anyone done anything so melodramatic?!

      Alonso’s comments were harsh, but to be honest I think they should be. Ferrari have clearly slipped back relative to their competitors at exactly the point in the season they needed to improve. Unless they find the kind of time Red Bull bolted onto the car at Singapore last year, they are in big trouble. If Mercedes have finally sorted out (or lucked into) a solution to their tyre problems, it’s more likely they are the only team that can challenge RBR (I don’t think Lotus are able to maintain the type of development race needed for a title challenge).

      • celeste (@celeste) said on 29th July 2013, 22:03

        @bleeps_and_tweaks @Keithcollantine well is kind of a legendary thing. Like how people was afraid to get on to the same elevator of Steve Jobs because they willy certanly be fired by the end of the ride.

        Anyways, maybe Montezemolo got inspiration from Alonso´s samurai tweets…

      • OmarR-Pepper (@omarr-pepper) said on 30th July 2013, 5:26

        Has anyone done anything so melodramatic?

        I remember a pic of Carlos Sainz father and his rally team in a pic where everybody had a knife on their teeth, but of course it was a joyul photo (I can’t find it on the web, sorry)

    • bertie (@bertie) said on 29th July 2013, 21:50

      It does make you wonder what kind of work environment this creates. If I was an engineer I would certainly think twice about joining a company so engulfed in politics.

      The recent link of Alonso and redbull I thought was utter nonsense but with this ever increasing tension we are seeing on the outside makes you wonder how much we are not seeing on the inside. Perhaps there is more to this. Maybe Alonso has a performance clause in his contract that he can exercise. Can you imagine, and i know it is unlikely, seeing Alonso driving purposely slow to trigger the clause – that would be a story.

      • Keith Collantine (@keithcollantine) said on 29th July 2013, 22:41

        @tmax That’s pretty good but you didn’t see the knives bit coming :-)

        • tmax (@tmax) said on 30th July 2013, 7:32

          @keithcollantine I must admit the knives stuff was way beyond my imagination. What better technique to demotivate the team during the summer break than this.

          Who knows Kimi moves to Red bull, Alonso moves back to his home base Lotus Renault, Massa the pet of big Luca is the number 1 driver at Ferrai……. We are talking one big season next year.

    • HoHum (@hohum) said on 30th July 2013, 1:46

      But this is the real Ferrari, the Schumacher/Brawn era that so many F1 fans grew up with was the anomaly, not the norm.

  15. Ben (@scuderia29) said on 29th July 2013, 18:20

    Alonso will stay with ferrari and he will win a world championship with them, i am convinced. Alonso is a little frustrated but no more than any other driver has been, he’ll get past it. If someone had suggested Alonso would leave ferrari a few weeks ago they would have been called an idiot, its just a minor bit of frustration. And about his manager visiting red bull..im positive that meeting would have been about Carlos Sainz jnr.

    • erix said on 30th July 2013, 13:14

      So if Teflonso left or got fired by LDM or he never won WDC with Ferrari, who the idiot then?

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