McLaren tipped to sign Magnussen for 2014

F1 Fanatic Round-up

Kevin Magnussen, McLaren, Buddh International Circuit, 2013In the round-up: McLaren are increasingly strongly tipped to be about to sign Kevin Magnussen as a replacement for Sergio Perez next year.

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McLaren chooses Magnussen for 2014 (Autosport)

“The team has decided to promote the Formula Renault 3.5 champion, although a contract has not yet been signed.”

Magnussen to replace Perez at McLaren (BBC)

Martin Whitmarsh: “We haven’t confirmed our driver line-up. We haven’t signed contracts with drivers.”

Perez out at McLaren (Joe Saward)

“The news has yet to be confirmed by McLaren, but it appears that the team chose not to take up its option for the Mexican to continue in 2014.”

Bernie Ecclestone signs $600 million Formula One deal (AutoWeek)

“I travel the world making business on a hand shake. And all of a sudden I’m no longer in any position to do anything, so who would want to accept my signature on a contract? I’ve just signed a contract now for 600 million-odd with people over the weekend. I can’t do that if people think I’m going to be fired in the morning.”

Ecclestone shows powerful grip on F1 (FT registration)

“What has emerged from all of Mr Ecclestone?s testimony is a brusque, unyielding management style spanning many years. He revealed his liking for shredding documents and letters, and his dislike of shareholder democracy. ‘I’ve never been interested in corporate governance and I?m not today either,’ he said.”

Bernie Ecclestone tries to clear F1 float by giving FIA a 1% stake (The Guardian)

Ecclestone: “The FIA gets 1% if F1 floats but the teams don’t have shares.”

Pastor Maldonado, Williams, Shanghai, International Circuit, 2013Motor racing-Williams end tie-up with major sponsor PDVSA (Reuters)

Deputy team principal Claire Williams: “There is no (further) connection with PDVSA as obviously Pastor [Maldonado] is now leaving the team.”

Q&A with Felipe Massa on 2014 driver line-up (Williams)

“[Valtteri Bottas has] proved this year to be a very good driver and very quick. Pastor was always very quick, especially in qualifying, so to keep pace with him in the first year is impressive.”

Rookie diary – with Marussia?s Jules Bianchi (F1)

“The Suzuka accident was really strange – and frustrating. I could not do anything as my arm was stuck and I was reduced to passenger. It was doubly frustrating as the pace was really good until then, so it is hard to let things slip out of your hand. And of the tracks new to me this season, Suzuka was my favourite. It is simply amazing. I knew Spa and love it dearly, but Suzuka is really, really different. A race driver?s dream come true!”

Lewis Hamilton: I?m driven to educate the world?s poorest (Metro)

“After the Indian Grand Prix in Delhi, I took time out to visit a Save the Children project in Kolkata and meet some of the kids the charity helps.”

BT plots major raid on Sky (The Telegraph)

“Sky Sports? coverage of England cricket and rugby matches, British and Irish Lions tours, the Ryder Cup golf, men?s tennis and Formula One could all therefore come under threat in the coming years, never mind the broadcaster?s strangle??hold on Premier League football in the next round of bidding.”

Bernie sells his G650 to Thai Businessman for $72 million (BizJetBlogger)

Only of tangential interest but an article I missed when it first appeared two months ago.

F1 contracts: Don’t rock the boat (ESPN)

[Ayrton] Senna was suspended forthwith. There would be no racing for the Brazilian that weekend at Monza. Doubly unfortunate was the fact that this would be the home grand prix for Sergio Tacchini, the Italian sportswear company with whom Ayrton had a personal sponsorship deal.”

Emmo: Can Austin build a US legacy? (McLaren)

Emerson Fittipaldi: “The self-proclaimed Circuit of the Americas is a truly sensational racetrack – very technical, very challenging, full of elevation changes, full of daunting turns. The facilities are excellent, too, and the safety features are state-of-the-art.”

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Comment of the day

@Fixy, whose avatar is Felipe Massa’s helmet, on Ferrari’s farewell to their loyal lieutenant:

It?s indeed a bit sad Alonso didn?t turn up, especially as he was the one who Massa sacrificed himself most for. Schumacher, maybe Badoer and Fisichella would have been nice additions too, and perhaps Raikkonen could have popped up to thank his team mate and the driver he is replacing.

But to have Luca di Montezemolo, Sergio Marchionne and Piero Ferrari all there to wave goodbye to Felipe just highlights how important and loved he was at Ferrari. And despite what joy the 2008 title could have brought, how can one be sad when he says: “I am happy with the way my time with the Prancing Horse turned out”? Even only driving for Ferrari is a privilege, and Felipe almost turned it into a dream.

Very nice to see his F2008 hasn?t been repainted, and that he got to drive it to return, at least with memory, to those wonderful moments I remember so vividly in Brazil. I ended in a bad way, but a Formula 1 season is long and brings many joys over its course. 11 wins can?t be forgotten, and his relevance goes beyond those numbers.
@Fixy

From the forum

Happy birthday!

Happy birthday to Christian Briddon and A-Safieldin!

If you want a birthday shout-out tell us when yours is by emailling me, using Twitter or adding to the list here.

On this day in F1

And happy birthday to George Eaton, who is 68 today.

Eaton entered just over a dozen races in the early seventies, qualifying for most of them, but never scored a point. His only full season came in 1970 with BRM, where he scored a career-best tenth on home ground in Canada at the Mont Tremblant circuit.

A one-off return to F1 the following year, also at home but this time at Mosport, saw him classified 15th after tangling with Ronnie Peterson five laps from home. He ended his racing career the following year.

Images ?? McLaren/Hoch Zwei, Williams/LAT

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115 comments on McLaren tipped to sign Magnussen for 2014

  1. JCost (@jcost) said on 12th November 2013, 8:11

    McLAren has recently learned that giving young talent a change can work sometimes. Maybe KM will not cause a huge impact in 2014 like Hamilton did back in 2007 but from what I’ve seen from him, I think it’s a risk worth taking.

    And it’s great to see a driver from Northern Europe who’s not Finn :)

  2. Trido (@trido) said on 12th November 2013, 8:12

    I am really surprised. I thought they would keep Perez for another season. He had moments of brilliance in a mediocre car. It is rough to condemn him when McLaren couldn’t give him a car that could compete.

    • JCost (@jcost) said on 12th November 2013, 8:20

      As per BBC, their simulator data and KM’s testing data suggests that KM is already faster than Perez…

      I think Checo is a good driver but most his brilliant performances come from alternative strategies because he lacks qualy pace and sometimes fails to get into Q3 even when the car is capable of. Plus, not being able to convince Slim Helu family to title sponsor McLaren probably cost his seat… #justsayin’

    • @jcost Danish and Finnish people are always faster but Checo had good racing material in him, maybe not WDC but he was good. It’s a shame because I thought that in a mediocre car he was pretty good. Better than Jenson at times. He deserved another year.

      Does Magnussen have a lot of money, can he be pay driving?

      • JCost (@jcost) said on 12th November 2013, 10:19

        @aish I think Checo in a top team would only land a WDC if the car massivley faster than the rest like Brawn was in early races of 2009. In a compact field with a good teammate he would not make it. On the other hand, future can prove me wrong, I see in KM the best thing out of McLaren’s pool since Lewis Hamilton and a guy who can win WDC.

        I think there many talented young drivers in feeder series deserving a chance and KM and Antonio Felix da Costa are already F1 material.

      • AFAIK Magnussen dosent have any money to speak of, DK is small contry, and in addition dont have a very big motorsport scene. He was sponsored by Jack&Jones in FR3.5 though.

      • @aish agreed people failed to see how good the sauber was that said Button has proved that he ain’t that good either and arguably he is slightly less valued sponsorship are concerned but he has enough sponsorship to find another spot perhaps.

  3. Sumedh said on 12th November 2013, 8:16

    Perez out of Mclaren in just 1 year seems very harsh.
    But its not surprising. Being upstaged by Button in qualifying is a big mistake to do.

    Now that you take a good look at Perez’s performances of 2012, it was clear that all his podiums came from starting outside the top 10 whereas Kamui qualified in the top 10. Perez then had an extra set of tyres to make merry in the race. At the end of 2012, the difference between Kamui and Perez was just 3 points. Yet, one got an upgrade to Mclaren. The other got booted out of the sport. Now, it seems that both of them weren’t any good at all.

    • jonathan102 (@jonathan102) said on 12th November 2013, 9:16

      The car might be ****, but when you only score 58% of the points of your teammate it’s difficult to justify another year.

    • GongTong (@gongtong) said on 12th November 2013, 9:46

      I’m inclined to agree with you, but I think you’re about to get a hellfire barrage of condemnation for slating Kamui! I never rated either of them either, so I always saw the inter-team battle as academic.

      I think dropping Perez was the right course of action if KM really is as good as he seems. He was always going to be a stop gap for McLaren in my opinion, and would only be kept on if he proved himself to be amazing.

    • Strontium (@strontium) said on 12th November 2013, 13:26

      @gongtong is right. You are about to get a hellfire barrage of condemnation for slating Kamui.

      Kobayashi was brilliant for me! He would be one of the best if he was still in F1 right now (instead of the drivers with a heavy wallet).

    • Paul (@frankjaeger) said on 12th November 2013, 23:13

      *hellfire barrage of condemnation for slating Kamui*

      • Jay Menon (@jaymenon10) said on 13th November 2013, 0:09

        Kobayashi’s results last year wast a true a reflection of his performances. Perez got lucky with tyre strategy for the podiums he got at Montreal and Monza, note that he had this advantage because he didnt make Q3.

        Kobayashi’s drive to the podium in Japan was proper class. He would have done pretty well at Spa as well, if it was for crashy Romain. Maybe Im being biased, but Kamui definitely showed more wheel to whell prowess than Checo…but hey, its no surprise the wallet gets you over the line.

  4. verstappen (@verstappen) said on 12th November 2013, 8:19

    Bernie sells plane for 72 million. According to the same blog, comparable planes go for about 34 million.
    Hmmmmm.

    • JCost (@jcost) said on 12th November 2013, 8:22

      Man, Bernie should write a book.

    • BasCB (@bascb) said on 12th November 2013, 11:24

      Off course we do not know what the plane was loaded with (in perks, electronics etc), but as the stated reason for selling it off was that its said to not have enough power to start at some of the airfields Bernie wants it to go while fully loaded, I would imagine there is a LOT packed in @verstappen.
      Well, and this is Bernie doing business off course (who knows how much one pays to get a new jet immediately instead of having to wait 2 years or whatnot)

      • Nick (@nick-uk) said on 12th November 2013, 18:11

        @bascb Perhaps he is selling it off in anticipation of an EPIC fine coming his way as part of a legal settlement/sentence… I mean who spends that kind of money on a plane without checking into whether or not it would be able to take off on short runways while at maximum load.

        • BasCB (@bascb) said on 12th November 2013, 18:20

          Maybe from when it was ordered and delivery time the airfields he wants to go to changed @nick-uk!

          As for the fine – there will most likely not be a fine. Although Bernie might take out some more money to put in “insurances” :-P

    • GeorgeTuk (@georgetuk) said on 12th November 2013, 12:42

      There can be alot of difference in plane values at the high end, this can include what electronic suites are loaded, what kind of weather kit is in it, the number of air miles on the engines, which engines, the interior.

    • Lord Stig (@lord-stig) said on 12th November 2013, 21:37

      A G650 has a list price of $65 million and that is without an interior. So $72 million is not an unusual price.

  5. Chris (@tophercheese21) said on 12th November 2013, 8:22

    Bad news for Perez.
    I don’t really know what Mclaren were expecting when even the chosen one wouldn’t be able to get that car on the podium.

    I think he deserves another year. Same for Button, it’s not like he’s been much better…

    • GeeMac (@geemac) said on 12th November 2013, 9:20

      Button has out qualified Perez 9-8 and is 12-5 up in the races. Considering that Button isn’t exactly rated as the best qualifier on the grid and the huge gulf in the race results it is no surprise that McLaren are questioning Perez’s abilities. Throw in the apparently significant difference in abilities between Magnussen and Perez in the simulator and it doesn’t look good for Perez. There is also the more human side of it, Perez just doesn’t “feel” like a McLaren driver to me whereas Magnussen does.

      As I said in the forum (http://www.f1fanatic.co.uk/groups/f1/forum/topic/magnussen-in-mclaren/?topic_page=2&num=15#post-113838) bagging him at the end of this year would be harsh on Perez, but it can be justified.

    • BasCB (@bascb) said on 12th November 2013, 11:27

      I’d say we should rather understand this as McLaren wanting to give Magnussen the chance he deserves. They probably saw him coming already, although more likely would have wanted to give him a year in a Marussia or FI before promoting him. And a gamble on an impressive Perez last year was just the stopgap they were looking for.
      In the end the gamble did not pay off really (lacklustre car, no mexican money interests lured in and Perez not being a relevation but just a solid driver), but it did not hurt them either.

  6. Girts (@girts) said on 12th November 2013, 8:27

    There’s nothing wrong about signing Kevin Magnussen except the fact that now I’m feeling old as I remember watching his father race! Seriously, there’s been so much talk about sponsorships, investors and money lately that it’s refreshing to see a young talent making it to F1 purely on merit.

    It’s really sad that Perez’s McLaren career turned out to be so short and so desperately unsuccessful. For sure, no one expected him to win the title and there is no doubt that Perez himself hasn’t performed well enough but I think several podiums and a win or two would have been possible if the car hadn’t been such a dog. The last McLaren driver, who ended his career at the team without scoring a podium for them was Mark Blundell (in 1995).

    I also believe that the fact that McLaren has been openly chasing Alonso despite everything that happened in 2007 and is ready to take a rookie to replace Perez indicates that the team isn’t very convinced about Button’s ability to win another world championship.

    • Nick (@nick101) said on 12th November 2013, 11:22

      I also believe that the fact that McLaren has been openly chasing Alonso despite everything that happened in 2007 and is ready to take a rookie to replace Perez indicates that the team isn’t very convinced about Button’s ability to win another world championship.

      I see what you’re saying but find it more than a little annoying! After all, JB is the driver who has got McLaren the closest they have been to the title in the last 4 years finishing 2nd in 2011.

      Their last ‘great’ driver only managed a highest finish of 4th in the same time period.

      • danclapp (@danclapp) said on 12th November 2013, 17:56

        No no Ham WC mclaren driver 2008, also 1 point behind in 2007. More than Button could achieve. Also Button was soclose in 2011 lol, ha ha are u for real. He came 2nd by miles he besst Ham in his mid life crisis. If Ham came 4th were did JB come last year.

        • Nick (@nick101) said on 13th November 2013, 7:58

          He came 2nd by miles he besst Ham in his mid life crisis

          Oh, was Hamilton the only driver Button bet in 2011?? Funny, I thought he also beat everyone else on the grid (exept Vettel) including Alonso.

      • danclapp (@danclapp) said on 12th November 2013, 18:03

        @nick101

        Be honest with yaself for once he is talking truth its doubtful JB will even win another race(i hope he does as a brit). At east Ham is still about to enter his prime, Ham as been poor last 2 races but he as had poles, and should be 2 wins. Ham is 28, But is 33. Ham will have plenty of chances, we will see next year Merc are supposed to have the best engine, we may even see a shootout. Their is still clever people at thats team, im just not confident in JB now?, is that wrong to say? He is getting older, and he is still fairly slow in qually. That is all im saying 9-8 v Perez in qually is not good isit?

        • @danclapp while I am more fond of HAM than I am of BUT ( I still like both which is something alot of their fans seem to have a hard time doing). I agree with @nick101 to an extent, he did get highest in the championship in the “Vettel Years” for Mclaren. I think saying he may never win another race to be quite harsh. He is not a blistering qualifier, he does hustle the car forward, especially through strategy in the race. Another JB win may be more than just a dream.

  7. Alex Brown (@splittimes) said on 12th November 2013, 8:29

    McLaren yet to confirm. I wonder if this is gamesmanship to get a better deal on Perez? A lot of journalists reporting its truth, though.

  8. Kimi4WDC said on 12th November 2013, 8:34

    Can’t fault McLaren, they wanted similar impact Hamilton, Raikkonen or Vettel. They already have driver who drives well when everything is good, they want someone who can make impact day in and day. Worth a gamble.

  9. WilliamB (@william-brierty) said on 12th November 2013, 8:40

    What is it with F1 and rash decisions at the moment? OK, Magnussen definitely deserved a drive, but he didn’t deserve to be parachuted into a top team either, especially if it is to the detriment of a strong driver like Perez; who was massively improving in the second half of season. When I initially floated the idea of Magnussen potentially replacing Perez several months ago on this very forum, I was shot down by incredulity and allegations of being deluded; and couple that with increasingly strong showings from Sergio, and his replacement never even crossed my mind until this week. But here we are, in the cold reality of a gloomy November morning when the career of yet another young hopeful, Perez, is being thrown to the dogs. I don’t really see any real difference between Grosjean’s and Perez’s seasons. Both started quite poorly, but got increasingly stronger as the season progressed. However whilst one is being heralded as a team hero, the other is off down the job centre. The difference? Perez’s stronger performances aren’t as obvious as Grosjean’s because he isn’t at the sharp end of the field like Romain. But surely McLaren of all teams can still recognize a strong drive when it sees one? No? Oh, so it turns out that McLaren and Helmut Marko are one and the same…run, young hopefuls, run…

    On another note – How can the BBC possibly know that…

    McLaren’s analysis of Magnussen’s performance in their simulator suggests he is already faster than Perez

    Oh right, it’s Andrew “Assertion” Benson writing…

    • maarten.f1 (@maarten-f1) said on 12th November 2013, 9:12

      What makes you think McLaren doesn’t recognize a strong drive when they see one? Perhaps McLaren is seeing stronger drives by Magnussen in the simulator. It’s a cutthroat business, Formula 1. The number of potential drivers is much larger than the number of available seats, and you either make it or break it. You cannot take anything for granted.

      We only see the results, the team sees the whole picture. And they’re clearly not satisfied with the whole picture. I think Hamilton leaving the team came a bit unexpected to them and they had to sign someone, and that someone was Perez. Ferrari passed him up, and on hindsight, maybe a good decision.

      • Tifoso1989 (@tifoso1989) said on 12th November 2013, 10:27

        @maarten-f1

        What makes you think McLaren doesn’t recognize a strong drive when they see one?

        Sigining Sergio Perez is a good reason to think so

      • WilliamB (@william-brierty) said on 12th November 2013, 17:18

        @maarten-f1

        What makes you think McLaren doesn’t recognize a strong drive when they see one?

        The fact that they’ve obviously ignored Perez’s recent good form, including his Indian drive, by signing Magnussen. McLaren have handed Perez a substandard car, and because of its cross-channel-ferry-like understeer, Perez, who uses oversteer to rotate the car mid-corner has struggled all season. And details like that cannot, and should not be overlooked as they are very much the foundations of a successful season. And let’s face it, McLaren are essentially saying that they are bad at judging the talents of young drivers by dropping Perez, who was selected out of a market of drivers that also included a certain Nico Hulkenberg. Magnussen, as I have said time and time again as I will continue to do so deserves a seat in F1, but so does Sergio Perez.

    • GongTong (@gongtong) said on 12th November 2013, 9:56

      So, they have a seat to fill for a year and give it to a 22 year old who has shown SOME signs of talent. After a fairly mediocre year they make the (apparently) justified decision not to let him continue at the team so they can make space for… Their own highly promising, young driver academy, 21 year old.

      Yet you imply that McLaren have no time for helping out youngsters?

      Now, I think you should stop blaming the teams for the hopes of young driver’s being so slim and look to the governance. If there were more seats available, more young drivers would be getting a poke at this sport. If there were more testing opportunities they’d have more time to show their hand. If there was a cap on age for driver entry, they’d have longer in lower categories to get settled.

      I don’t know if any of the above solutions would necessarily be successful, but I certainly don’t think it’s fair to lumber the blame all on the teams.

      • WilliamB (@william-brierty) said on 12th November 2013, 17:38

        @gongtong – Yes, I am saying McLaren isn’t helping young drivers. Firstly, premature promotion is as bad a curse as any for a young hopeful. Now I’m not necessarily saying that Magnussen isn’t ready for F1, but I strongly doubt whether he’s ready for the onset of pressure that is coming his way through being parachuted into a top team. Now the paddock has a very short memory, so if Magnussen struggles to perform under motorsport’s most intense spotlight that’ll form most of the public perception of Kevin as opposed to any junior category heroics. In many ways Kovalainen’s career would’ve been much better had he spent several more seasons at Renault before being catapulted into a seat alongside “young gun benchmark” Hamilton. And it is the failure to acknowledge that different driver react in different ways that is going against both the McLaren and Red Bull driver programmes, who are both looking for another Vettel or Hamilton, but failing to realize the immense individuality of each promotion into F1.

        McLaren’s failure to accept circumstance also makes them accountable here. They failed to give Perez a good car. They also failed to give Perez the necessary oversteer with which he rotates the car. So how can Perez be expected to perform outstandingly? And when he does perform, such as he did in India, why must they turn a blind eye?

        I don’t think a larger number of seats is remotely desirable. Don’t we want F1 to be hard to get into? A premier category? Do you want F1 watered down by the Stefano Colettis and Facu Regalias of this world? I do however agree with you on an age cap.

        • GongTong (@gongtong) said on 15th November 2013, 12:59

          @william-brierty I’m not sure if you got it from my previous post or not, but to clarify, I am well opposed to “premature promotion”. I think it’s a serious problem, hence my suggestion of the age cap (Although that is a bit of a brutal solution).

          I agree that it seems reckless for a team to hope for a Vettel/Hamilton, however, there ARE a lot of options kicking about right now. Sadly, for Mclaren, none of the options are proven championship winners. I think they took a punt on Perez and decided it hadn’t paid off. We do have to bear in mind that Mclaren have nurtured many talents over the years and have access to a lot more data than us.

          As for comparing him to Button, it pains me to say it as a long-term fan of his, BUT, he is in the twilight of his career and it is widely acknowledged that he is terrible in a bad car. I think Perez would have needed to be beating him comprehensively to retain the seat.

          I definitely don’t want the sport watered down by the types you mention above. But I do think that we could EASILY fill 30 seats with top-tier drivers if teams weren’t so desperate for the money. With proper cost controls, we could have ten teams running three cars and jobs for the likes of Valsecchi, Kovalainen, Kobayashi et al. Of course it should be hard to get into, but any fan of the above drivers will agree; not this hard.

    • GongTong (@gongtong) said on 12th November 2013, 10:00

      Oh, and the the difference between Grosjean and Perez is simple. Romain is managed by his team principle. They have both stood by each other, it’s a fairly suspect conflict of interests but it seems to have worked out well.

      Perez on the other hand was being backed by Ferrari. As soon as a McLaren seat was on the table he cut the apron strings and chipped.

      As stated above by Marteen, it’s a cut throat game. In this case, it kinda worked both ways.

    • faulty (@faulty) said on 12th November 2013, 21:48

      On another note – How can the BBC possibly know [the simulator]…

      Team in-fighting, divided camps as has been rumoured?, Whitmarsh’s weakened figure being torpedoed?

      It seems the musical chair games will be danced to the tunes Maldonado and now Pérez can get the jukebox to play, with their monies.

  10. Osvaldas31 (@osvaldas31) said on 12th November 2013, 9:41

    I’m really glad that Magnussen is driving Mclaren next year (I hope these reports will come true). Many people say that Perez deserves another year. I would agree, if he was driving Sauber or other midfield team. But now he is driving Mclaren – a top team, which set high standards and he didn’t drive like a top team driver. He made lots of mistakes, he tried to stamp his authority by ‘dirty’ racing, but it didn’t impress anybody.

    Besides, rookie doesn’t necessarily have to start from back of the grid or midfield team. Some drivers start in a midfield team but never end up in a top team, although they deserve that (Hulkenberg may be good example if he doesn’t get that Lotus seat next year). Mclaren’s decision to give a race seat to Hamilton paid off more than anybody expected.

  11. Sam (@) said on 12th November 2013, 9:42

    On McLaren and Perez;

    Often drivers are without contract and they race like never before and I always wonder, where was that form in the previous races all season long. If they wanted that seat why didn’t they find the motivation to drive all that season fast and not just those few races.

    Take Perez now, he says ‘this is the most important weekend of my season’. So does he really believe that when he manages to get that McLaren onto the podium he will retain his seat for 2014? He had to perform all season and not just shine at two or three weekends. India did him good but in Abu Dhabi he really underperformed. Possibly stress and the idea that his career might be another Kovalianen-story without the victory.

    Take Ricciardo, Webber announces his retirement and all of a sudden Ricciardo qualifies three times in the top 10. Previous to that his average was 12th on the grid. 2,5 months ago he was anounced as a RBR driver and his form immediatly dropped dramatically scoring one point since Monza.

    Another example is Massa, everytime his seat at Ferrari was at stake he started to out-qualify Alonso. If Alonso wouldn’t be in for a championship like in 2012 he would also race him every race. Since he knows he cannot stay at Ferrari he scored 39 points. Out-qualifying Alonso 4 times in the last 5 races.

    So maybe a team like McLaren and Ferrari should work with one-year contracts and let their drivers know they can be sacked every race if they don’t perform. Put the pressure on and those who fail to perform under it don’t deserve to be in F1.

    • Prisoner Monkeys (@prisoner-monkeys) said on 12th November 2013, 9:49

      When a driver’s seat is under threat, the team usually tell them what they need to do in order to keep their seat, unless they prove to be completely incompetent. So when Perez says this is the most important race of his career, it’s probably because it’s his last chance to meet his targets. Given some of his recent races, it’s probably a points target.

    • Robbie said on 12th November 2013, 11:19

      I take your point to a small degree. While I do think it is valid to consider whether the threat of losing one’s seat makes a driver faster, I suspect most of the drivers in that position are already motivated enough and what we are seeing is coincidence moreso than ‘extra motivation’ by threat.

      Eg. FM’s Ferrari tenure has been questioned since 2010, so perhaps his recent form vs. FA has as much to do with FA’s bad back, a slowdown in car development now that RBR are the winners, and perhaps an FM that has no need to play second fiddle as his role in the team as he’s leaving, and they’ve already lost both Championships.

      SP saying this is a really important weekend does not mean he is saying the other weekends were not…he’s just stating a fact…and it’s no guarantee that means he will do better than other weekends. I suspect in other weekends where he seemed to underperform it was more because he was showing us his best, in a car that obviously lacks, which apparently is still not good enough for Mac, but I wouldn’t conclude he was showing us an unmotivated SP.

      Your suggestion does appear to hold a little more water regarding DR, but then his situation has (had) a different flavour to it and holds the concept that he is moving up within the same family, which is a bit different than most drivers experience, and it doesn’t appear that his job at TR was in threat…just that there was an opportunity to climb the corporate ladder, and it has worked out for him.

      Anyway, I doubt it is feasible to just replace drivers at the drop of a hat, on a race by race basis, and there are far more positive ways to motivate drivers on top of their likely already very high self-motivation, than a constant guillotine over their heads. Your suggestion sounds a bit to me like “the beatings shall continue until morale improves.”

    • mantresx (@mantresx) said on 12th November 2013, 16:17

      Take Ricciardo, Webber announces his retirement and all of a sudden Ricciardo qualifies three times in the top 10. Previous to that his average was 12th on the grid.

      Hehe you’re right, even Daniel admitted that he started to push a little more knowing that it was a competition to get the seat between him and Vergne, however, there’s a higher risk of making mistakes so I can understand why don’t drive like that all the time.

  12. Ben (@scuderia29) said on 12th November 2013, 9:47

    it would be very harsh to get rid of perez after just 1 season, its not like he’s driven awfully, erratic at times but he’s trying to impress in a poor car. They surely didnt expect him to do a hamilton. Its not like Button has completely shown him up and he’s certainly been closer to his world champion team mate than the other drivers partnering a champion (rosberg probably being the exception though) he needs to be given another year, i cant see how magnusson could perform better in his debut season in 2014 than a more experienced perez

  13. Funkyf1 (@funkyf1) said on 12th November 2013, 9:53

    It’s a done deal! Checo is looking for a drive along with Maldonado and the Hulk

    • Prisoner Monkeys (@prisoner-monkeys) said on 12th November 2013, 9:56

      I’d love to know your source on that, since McLaren won’t even confirm if Button has a seat next year.

    • JCost (@jcost) said on 12th November 2013, 10:54

      @funkyf1

      I can see the picture.

      Pastor calling President Nicolas Maduro asking for money to promote Venezuela and that he could convince Vijay Malia rebrand the team to Forza Venezuela and change the livery accordingly. If FI plan fails they could make Lotus change name to Scuderia Bolivariana PDVSA Lotus F1.

      Sergio Perez is “touring” with his bag half empty but he would sell the idea that the coming Mexican GP demands a strong local driver that Gutierrez isn’t and Force India or Lotus would welcome a good driver with his Mexican sponsors or Sauber would be pleased to have to young Mexicans in their early 20s as they drivers in 2014 fighting to partner their Russian teenager who would be given another year to mature his driving. If that happens, Sauber would welcome the name Sauber Rent-A-Car F1 Team.

      While Hulkenberg will be sending digital CVs including videos of his performances in different teams and highlighting his skills while making a point on bringing nothing but his skilful hands and massive feet…

  14. Todd (@braketurnaccelerate) said on 12th November 2013, 10:12

    What we’re missing about the Perez situation, is that it shows how high (or low, in this case) McLaren regard Jenson Button’s speed. They expected a 3rd year driver to come in to a new team, compete with and even beat Jenson from the get-go. Maybe they really wanted to get rid of Button after the 2013 season, but with an under performing Checo, they couldn’t dump their better driver.

    • Robbie said on 12th November 2013, 11:29

      You know for a fact that is what they expected of SP? Perhaps his role was to support the team’s veteran driver and assist in car development and to push the team forward, and didn’t do that to Mac’s satisfaction based on things we armchair fans cannot be privy to.

  15. zippyone (@zippyone) said on 12th November 2013, 11:02

    The Lewis article says ex-world champion! Really annoys me when people say that about any champ, he is still a world champion just not the current world champ, dinwits.

    • @zippyone
      He is a previous world champion. Isn’t that what “ex….” implies? That he has been the world champion? There is only one guy with the number 1 on his car, and the WDC trophy on his kitchen table. And that guy isn’t Lewis. So I don’t really see what is wrong about calling him an ex-world champion.

      • @mads If an actor recieved an Oscar in 2007, is he an ex-Oscar winner because other people have recieved similar trophies since then, or is he an Oscar winner for the rest of his life? I think it’s the same with the F1 title. It’s the sort of title that carries on throughout his career. If Vettel doesn’t win next year, will he be an 4 time ex-world champion? The “ex” part doesn’t really belong, imo.

        • @gicu
          There is quite a difference though. An Oscar is awarded to several people each year, and when they have it, no one can take it away from them.
          A world championship is a different matter however. Once you have won it, you are THE world champion. There can only be one reigning world champion at any time.
          The trophy is also a rolling trophy, so once you loose the championship you have to pass it on to the new world champion.
          That’s the way I see it anyway.

          • @mads
            Fair point, but I still think that once you’re a world champion, you’re always a world champion, not an ex. A world title winner. The fact that it’s a rolling trophy doesn’t mean that when you pass it on, you also lose the accomplishment you worked for the year before. I see it as being disrespectful for the driver, as it’s just as easy saying “the [year] F1 World Champion”.

          • zippyone (@zippyone) said on 15th November 2013, 20:10

            @mads

            No, to me the word ‘ex’ implies he is no longer a world champ, of course I realise he is not the current world champ, for example, a common use of the term ‘ex’ is that of an ex-wife/girlfriend which means she is no longer your wife/girlfriend.

          • @zippyone
            I don’t think we disagree on what ‘ex’ implies. My point is, exactly, that he isn’t the world champion any more. He has been a world champion. So he still stands as the 2008 world champion. But he isn’t the current world champion.
            Which is why I think that it is correct to speak of him, and anyone bar Vettel right now, as ex-champions.

          • zippyone (@zippyone) said on 15th November 2013, 20:28

            @mads No sorry I can’t agree with that, it is not correct to speak of any champ as ex-champions, Schumi is not an ex-champ, he is a champ, Alonso is not an ex-champ, he is a champ, Kimi is not an ex-champ, he is a champ, etc, etc.

            Likewise when Vettel is no longer the current world champ he will still be a world champ not an ex-champ. It is illogical to say ex.

          • @zippyone
            I think we should just agree to disagree and leave it at that, I don’t think either of us are going to convince the other. : )

          • zippyone (@zippyone) said on 16th November 2013, 14:38

            @mads Yes I agree to disagree but I am right though ;) (kidding!)

    • Michael Brown (@) said on 12th November 2013, 14:20

      There can be only one current World Champion, and that is Sebastian Vettel at the moment

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