Whiting denies DRS has made passing too easy

F1 Fanatic Round-up

Lewis Hamilton, Fernando Alonso, Circuit Gilles Villeneuve, Montreal, 2013In the round-up: FIA race director Charlie Whiting denies the Drag Reduction System has made overtaking too easy.

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Whiting insists DRS beneficial for F1 (Autosport)

“It still requires extreme skill from the driver. It is not as if it’s turn on, overtake, go, done.”

Surtees anniversary draws hope from loss (Reuters)

“Mr Ferrari agreed with me at the end, just before he died actually, that we’d both made a bit of a mistake in that we’d lost probably championships together with the parting that we did in 1966. That again was a bit impetuous.”

LaFerrari-based race car spied (Autocar)

“Reports that Ferrari is using the car to put mileage on its new 2014 F1 V6 are also said to be incorrect, as this would break the sport’s regulations.”

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Comment of the day

@Paul-A on budget capping and F1′s future:

In the beginning F1 developed as the fastest, top end of motor sport (now the ??pinnacle??) and attracted designers, manufacturers, drivers and fans (then called ??spectators?? and ??magazine readers??.) Over the last maybe twenty or so years it has seen an insidious input of ??spectacle?? and ??rules?? ? not all good, not all bad ? but all requiring more money and as any economist will tell you, there is a snowball effect in that you have to spend more and more in order to obtain more and more.

I don?t know how much the teams spend on ??rule compliance?? or how much the FIA puts into ??rule writing?? and ??rule enforcement?? covering design, testing, racing, tracks, etc… But if F1 wants to remain the ??pinnacle?? then innovation within very broad guidelines is an absolute necessity. Nit-picking minor details is counter-productive, very expensive and curtails innovative development.

As to the spectacle, the finances are outrageous. If Mr Ecclestone?s personal fortune and family trust were properly re-invested in F1, there would be no more talk of budget caps or pay drivers for years to come.

So, what do we want? The ultimate expression of the fastest man and machine combination? Or the flamboyancy of World Wrestling Entertainment with its tabloid driven squabbling? It all comes down to the freedom of achievement compared to the dreary, messy, over-regulated current state of affairs that is still called Formula One.
@Paul-A

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On this day in F1

1994 F1 seasonJordan revealed their 1994 F1 contender, the 194, 20 years ago today.

Rubens Barrichello, who was the team’s only confirmed driver for the season ahead at that point, put the first laps on the team’s fourth F1 car.

Also, happy 31st birthday to Adrian Sutil.

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55 comments on Whiting denies DRS has made passing too easy

  1. andae23 (@andae23) said on 11th January 2014, 8:14

    Whiting added that there are no plans to change the way that the DRS is used.

    Sigh

    • Girts (@girts) said on 11th January 2014, 14:50

      @andae23 I was disappointed to hear this, too.

      Whiting is also saying that “if [the cars] are at the same speed at the beginning of the DRS zone, they will be alongside at the braking point. That’s the whole theory of the DRS.”

      You study engineering so you can obviously judge this better but isn’t it a strange theory? I mean, cars will rarely be at the same speed at the beginning of the braking zone because normally the car, who has caught the car in front, is faster (even without the DRS). For sure, the speed difference will not always be the same all over the circuit, which is why we still see exciting battles now and then, even when DRS is involved. But my impression is that most DRS passes are relatively straightforward and predictable, simply because the car behind is already faster and DRS just eases the task.

      My only hope is that this year more durable tyres will make the battles slightly more spicy as the defending drivers won’t have to care so much about nursing their tyres, which was often the case in 2013.

      • andae23 (@andae23) said on 11th January 2014, 16:51

        @girts I guess it’s a bit irrelevant, because the length of most DRS zones is not really calculated anymore (they probably were in 2011), but they determine the length by experience. So if a DRS zone proved to be ‘not powerful enough’, as in ‘an X number of drivers still struggled to overtake’, they make it longer. By now they probably have enough experience to apply this to new circuit as well, like Sochi and Spielberg.

        But to be honest, I gave up on trying to work out logic in any aspect of DRS :P

  2. It is not as if it’s turn on, overtake, go, done

    Yes…… that’s exactly what it is

  3. Juzh (@juzh) said on 11th January 2014, 11:09

    best thing would be to simply allow drs to be used by everyone say 5 times a race and be done with it.

  4. Hamilfan (@hamilfan) said on 11th January 2014, 11:43

    Dear Mr.Whiting,
    We don’t care whether DRS is easy to use or not . It’s unnecessary .

  5. Maciek (@maciek) said on 11th January 2014, 14:55

    Fantastic cotd @Paul-A, my sentiments precisely, but much more eloquently put than i could have done.

  6. zomtec (@zomtec) said on 11th January 2014, 19:11

    One DRS zone is good on some circuits, some need two but it’s unnecessary on others like Montreal and Monza. The worst about DRS is that it ruins classical overtaking spots like the hairpin in Montreal. People on the grandstands must have been shocked to see the drivers avoiding overtaking there.

    • PeterG said on 11th January 2014, 23:32

      The worst about DRS is that it ruins classical overtaking spots like the hairpin in Montreal. People on the grandstands must have been shocked to see the drivers avoiding overtaking there.

      All part of why me, My family & friends didn’t go to Montreal last year for the 1st time since 1990.

      I attended in 2011 & 2012 & sat at out usual spot at the hairpin, Saw far too many examples of cars backing out of overtakes into the hairpin thanks to the drs zone.

      Worst part about the Montreal drs zone is that not only does is make the passing far too easy but its also placed where there are no grandstands so what’s now classed as passing isn’t even done where any fans can see it apart from on the tv screens.

      Not going to Montreal this year either & won’t be going back there until drs is banned. Don’t even watch every race anymore either & pretty much everyone i know who used to watch f1 & attend Montreal are the same, All thanks to the drs which seems to be turning more people off f1 than attracting new people to it.

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