Raikkonen and Alonso may be ‘recipe for disaster’

F1 Fanatic Round-up

Kimi Raikkonen, Ferrari, Bahrain, 2014In the round-up: Alan Jones warns sparks could fly between Ferrari team mates Kimi Raikkonen and Fernando Alonso this year.

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Keeping Track – Episode 32 (Australian Grand Prix via SoundCloud)

Alan Jones: “I think it’s potentially a bit of recipe for disaster! I can’t see Kimi sort of pulling over and letting Alonso through.”

Ecclestone hopes every race will be like a wet race (Reuters)

“I hope every race is going to be like a wet race. Unpredictable is the word.”

Vettel ‘won’t be closest mate’ – Ricciardo (ESPN)

“Naturally, if I am competitive, I’m sure we’re not going to be the closest mates because he’s not going to like that and I’m not going to like getting my arse kicked if he’s going to be doing that.”

Symonds hails ‘superb’ Massa (Autosport)

“I didn’t know exactly what to expect because I didn’t know him particularly well before he joined Williams, but he is great.”

Chilton aiming for Melbourne points (The Telegraph)

“I’m hoping we can get that [first point] in Australia. If we can get some points there, then I might start to set myself some personal goals.”

Gerhard Berger suffers broken arm while skiing off-piste just over two month’s after Michael Schumacher’s life-threatening ski crash (The Independent)

“Former Formula One driver Gerhard Berger has suffered a broken arm while skiing in Austria, just 10 weeks after his old rival Michael Schumacher’s life-threatening accident that has left him in a coma in Grenoble University Hospital.”

Power steering (City AM)

“The closest F1 has to a successor is its chairman Peter Brabeck-Letmathe, appointed in 2012. However, he does not have hands-on experience running F1 and, as chairman of food and beverage group Nestle, is already busy.”

14 things to look forward to this Formula 1 season (F1 Rejects)

“What we are looking forward to is how everything else going on in the field will render these gimmicks completely unnecessary, thus sending the message loud and clear that F1 doesn’t need to superficially spice up the show.”

Looking ahead to Sebring and beyond (The way it is)

“If we’re not careful the interest in the sport is going to slip away. I’ve got three kids in college and one of them is interested in what I do, but the other two couldn’t care less. They don’t understand why people would drive around in circles wasting fuel. That’s what motor racing is to a lot of people and we have to work very hard to change those perceptions and make the sport more relevant.”

Video – why 2014 changes equal innovation, speed and intrigue (F1)

Something of a departure for the official F1 website – a video guide to the new season which even includes some classic F1 footage. And don’t miss the slimy sales pitch for the super-bonus-double-points-season-finale-bonanza.

Formula One season preview: Biggest change in decades to shake up F1 (Unibet)

My thoughts on the season ahead for Unibet.

Tweets

Comment of the day

@Infernojim sees an upside to the Mercedes-powered teams leading the early running:

I’d rather Mercedes be “dominant” than Ferrari or Renault. And I’m talking about dominant “power-train” here.

That means, Mercedes, Mclaren, Force India and Williams all up the sharp end. Whilst Mercedes (the team) do appear to have the edge, I think that the other Mercedes powered teams will all be strong, and that will lead to competition!

Ferrari’s other cars are only Marussia and Sauber, neither of which would compete with Ferrari properly if they were dominant; and the sense is that Ferrari will actually be pretty good anyway, just not quite as reliable as the Mercedes.

And in Renault you’ve got Red Bull, Lotus, Toro Rosso and Caterham. If Renault was dominant then Red Bull would be dominant, with Lotus giving them a push from time to time. And no one really wants to see that.

I expect that over time Ferrari and Renault will catch-up with Mercedes in terms of the power units, but if you’re going to start with one dominant power train I’d say Mercedes is the best that we could have asked for in terms of the relative competence and ability of each of the teams using them…

I’m so excited to see how this weekend pans out!
@Infernojim

From the forum

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On this day in F1

Alain Prost tested McLaren’s MP4-9 at Estoril 20 years ago today while he considered whether to scrap his plans for retirement following his 1993 world championship victory.

Meanwhile a four-day test at Imola concluded with Michael Schumacher quickest on a 1’21.078, 0.166s faster than the Williams of Ayrton Senna.

While all this was going on a shock announcement came from America which would have devastating consequences for IndyCar racing. Indianapolis Motor Speedway president Tony George announced plans to start a rival series in 1996. The split lasted 12 years and ruined America’s foremost single-seater championship.

Image © Ferrari/Ercole Colombo

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87 comments on Raikkonen and Alonso may be ‘recipe for disaster’

  1. Saddy said on 11th March 2014, 6:21

    I like Both Kimi and Alonso. But after looking at the pre season testing, it looks like Alonso is more comfortable with the new regulations and changes as compared to Kimi. They both have different style of driving so it will surly be close. However I dont care who is ahead or not as long as the fan (us) get some exciting racing. I am not a red bull hater but would like to see someone else win for a change. Mercs would be the new redbulls. Cant wait till Saturday…

  2. pH (@ph) said on 11th March 2014, 6:32

    My daughter has been reading HP & the Prisoner of Azkaban lately. This morning she’s been talking about it and I thought: How much the teams would pay for a time-turner at this stage.

  3. kyle dupell (@kyledupell89) said on 11th March 2014, 6:36

    Guys! Max Chilton made a funny

  4. infernojim (@infernojim) said on 11th March 2014, 7:34

    Cold! What a great start to the day!

  5. GeeMac (@geemac) said on 11th March 2014, 8:13

    But, inadvertently, what the 2014 season might dish up as a result is what the purist aficionados have been calling out for. A return to old-school values, if you will. Where close lap times and DRS-assisted passes don’t matter as much as a genuine battle for men to tame machines, where simply finishing is half the challenge, where mechanical elements are more of a determining factor than aerodynamic ones, and where drivers might be able to make more of a difference than they have in past seasons.

    Amen to that.

  6. Atticus (@atticus-2) said on 11th March 2014, 10:20

    Some interesting excerpts in this round-up.

    What we are looking forward to is how everything else going on in the field will render these gimmicks completely unnecessary, thus sending the message loud and clear that F1 doesn’t need to superficially spice up the show.

    “If we’re not careful the interest in the sport is going to slip away. I’ve got three kids in college and one of them is interested in what I do, but the other two couldn’t care less. They don’t understand why people would drive around in circles wasting fuel. That’s what motor racing is to a lot of people and we have to work very hard to change those perceptions and make the sport more relevant.”

    These are nice.

    I think that people could easily come to the conclusion of those two in the latter, if they, plainly speaking, see just that, because then that would mean the ‘other’ point is just not visible.

    The other point, I think, is the great unknown of who is the best. Which man and which machine. That’s why racing took and takes place in the first place – to decide, who’s faster, quicker, better. It’s the unpredictability element of racing, which draws masses of people, who’d like to see, who comes out on top. Because without racing, they would just not know. Those masses make racing a show, essentially.

    Now, what if we somehow get to know… Like, for instance, if someone and his or her team finds any kind of competitive advantage that keeps them at the front for a very very long period of time, say nine races in a row, four or five years in a row, people just get turned off. Enter the rulemakers, those who run the racing – and, incidentally, the show, which with its massive cash inflow keeps this level of competition alive – whose task is to ensure the unpredictability returns (or, if they’re good enough, stays), people return, cash inflow returns, competition stays alive.

    Now, here comes the hard part: the rulemakers do have to ‘spice up the show’ to help create new environment in which to find the best man and machine, but they must – and this is essential – have to make clever tweaks, else the first quote holds true.

    Examples for smart, fair (in other words sportsmanlike) rule changes: degrading (but not over-degrading) tyres with mandatory use of all compounds, anything which puts fuel strategy back in the picture (fuel limits, or refuelling with mandatory safety margins after disconnecting the fuel pumps), increasing the lifespan of parts to make reliability a bigger challenge (prompting unpredictability) with a knock-on effect on environment-friendliness and sustainability, etc.

    Examples for superficial, gimmicky changes: starting tyres, DRS, double points, you get the picture.

    See, it’s not that difficult to think about fair tweaks, which – this is the point – not only spice up the show, but sportsmanlike in character, as is fitting for racing and competition. And while I don’t envy the role of the rule-makers, honestly, they could do a better work by choosing the sensible changes over the latest ones. If rule changes only create show and does not bode well with racing and competition principles, those two guys (and, frankly, the masses of people) might just choose a reality show, any show, over F1 – because those, at least, are not wasting fuel while running.

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