FIA confirms Q3 changes to encourage more running

2014 F1 season

Sebastian Vettel, Red Bull, Singapore, 2013The FIA has confirmed further changes to qualifying ahead of the first race of the season.

Updated Sporting Regulations published by the FIA today include a series of changes intended to encourage drivers who reach the final stage of qualifying to set a time.

Any driver who reaches Q3 must now start the race on the set of tyres which he set his fastest time with in Q2. As before, this only applies if dry weather tyres were used for both Q2 and the start of the race.

Every driver will also be allocated an additional set of “option” compound tyres. Those who reach Q3 may only use it in that part of qualifying, and those who do not reach Q3 may only use them during the race.

This increases the total allocation of dry-weather tyres for each driver this year to 13. This is an increase from 11 last year, including the extra set of “prime” specification tyres for first practice which was previously announced.

The durations of two of the sessions have also been changed. Q3 has been extended by two minutes to 12 and Q1 shortened by a corresponding amount, in order to give drivers more time to set laps in Q3.

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99 comments on FIA confirms Q3 changes to encourage more running

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  1. Kingshark (@kingshark) said on 12th March 2014, 18:57

    This is far too confusing. It would make a lot more sense if FIA introduced “qualifying only” super-soft tyres.

      • mike-e (@mike-e) said on 13th March 2014, 3:28

        Why not just get rid of the rule that you have to start on the tyre you qualify on? Then people would go out in Q3 with the only incentive of improving their grid slot….. no wait…. thats too simple.

        Why not spin a wheel, and whoever it lands on gets a free pass to use 13 extra sets of uber soft tyres and gets a 2 lap headsl start? Does that sound more like something the FIA might impliment?

    • Chris Brighton said on 12th March 2014, 19:40

      It really isn’t confusing.

      • Spencer White (@jojobudgie) said on 12th March 2014, 20:23

        Yes it is.

      • BJ (@beejis60) said on 12th March 2014, 20:38

        Agreed Chris. Short story: person with fastest time in Q3 gets pole.

        • JimmyPuc said on 13th March 2014, 7:31

          As opposed to the fastest time in Q3 not getting pole last year? Wouldn’t it be way simpler if teams had their 13 sets of tyres for the weekend and complete freedom in their strategy?

      • It is confusing. They should make the sports regulations more clear and less dfficult to understand in order to attract a new audience. I mean, I understand what’s been said here, but I’d understand if someone else doesn’t. It doesn’t makes sense either. Just keep it simple and give drivers who reach Q3 an extra set of SuperSoft’s.. How difficult should it be?!

        • Kingshark (@kingshark) said on 12th March 2014, 20:55

          It really isn’t confusing.

          Maybe not to us, but what about the viewers who are new to F1? I prefer it if F1 to be simple and straight to the point. There is a reason to why European football is so much more popular than American football or Baseball – people prefer simple sports more than overly complex ones.

          • Not here in america, and these are the stupidest people in the world here. And if you want F1 simple, then idk what to tell u. Cuz it aint.

          • Irejag (@irejag) said on 12th March 2014, 23:40

            I live in North America and I don’t find American Football complicated at all. But then again, I am a fan of the sport, so I pay attention to the rules and understand them.
            F1 is kind of the same. We as fans might understand these new rules, but to outside observers, they seem odd and confusing.
            That said though. It would have been a lot easier to just make a rule stating that if you make Q3, you have to set at least (insert number) of laps. If you don’t, you get penalized 3 – 5 grid spots down from 10th. To me that would be a much better incentive to put in a lap time.
            Just saying…

          • drmouse (@drmouse) said on 13th March 2014, 15:41

            I prefer it if F1 to be simple and straight to the point.

            F1 will never be simple. It is, by it’s very nature, a complicated sport. All the technical and sporting regulations required mean it will always be complex and difficult to understand by a casual observer.

            I remember asking when I was much younger (still in primary school) why they couldn’t put a bigger engine in to make it go faster, and why they couldn’t put a cover over the cockpit to improve aero. The answer of “because they aren’t allowed” didn’t sit well with me at that age (in fact, in many ways it still doesn’t)

    • Jason (@jmwalley) said on 13th March 2014, 12:48

      Yeah, this is turning something really basic—ranking cars/drivers in order from fastest to slowest—into something really complicated. Imagine trying to explain all this to a new fan. It is stupid and unnecessarily complicated.

  2. This is a stupid rule , why do they have to start on Q2 tyres?? takes a lot of strategy out of the window.
    I have never understood someone starting from P10 with worn out softs and the man from P11 starting on fresh softs

  3. So if you’re not in the top 10 you get given a free pair of brand new tyres and if you are you have to use them? Am I missing something? Why should they get a brand new set for not qualifying high up?

    • Keith Collantine (@keithcollantine) said on 12th March 2014, 19:06

      @nico21 Presumably because those tyres would have to mounted onto wheels anyway, so this reduces the chances of 14 more sets of tyres being thrown away unused every weekend.

      • HoHum (@hohum) said on 12th March 2014, 19:14

        Maybe we need to go back to tyres that have a shelf life longer than 7 days.

        • BasCB (@bascb) said on 12th March 2014, 19:33

          But no one is going to buy the exta wheels to have them lie around. Not to mention storage of all these tyres allocated to a specific car and then keep track of how many to bring to what race @hohum. It would only work if they used the same compounds for each race and Pirelli would take care of storing them in between the races.

          • HoHum (@hohum) said on 12th March 2014, 19:41

            @bascb, point taken, I was thinking of an earlier, simpler time, when they did use the same compounds for each race, but we can’t go backwards, what next ? turbocharged engines?

          • BJ (@beejis60) said on 12th March 2014, 20:40

            @bascb Two extra sets of wheels is hardly a large increase in expenditure for these teams…

          • BasCB (@bascb) said on 12th March 2014, 21:07

            I see you didn’t understand it really @beejis60. Its not 2 extra sets. They need 2 sets fitted with the softer compound for that track. But you can have supersofts, softs or mediums as the softer tyres in a weekend and those would/could all be lying around for some of the cars. that means shipping all those extra sets from the track to pirelli for storage and then back out for the next track where they are needed. And keep in check how many tyres were fitted for what car and how many were returned, and how old they are etc.

          • mike-e (@mike-e) said on 13th March 2014, 3:36

            Or they could have the sets in their garage for the race, and if they use a set of the softer tyre in Q3, they could take that set of wheels+tyers back to the pirelli truck where the man there would swap that single used set for a new set, out of the 10 spare new sets he brings to the meeting for that specific reason. Its not rocket science, they are all the same size and spec, and its not hard for a professional to change a tyre and balance the wheel.

      • Jimmy_D (@jimmy_d) said on 13th March 2014, 5:45

        @keithcollantine, surely they can just ask the teams to hand the tyres back after qualifying is over.

        The idea that even teams that to get to Q3 also get an extra set of tyres has thrown me off a bit. I can’t help but feel that this is helping non-Q3 teams more in the race than the Q3 teams.

  4. Sir OBE said on 12th March 2014, 19:02

    So they’ve never heard of that one “keep it simple”?

    Why don’t they just award one additional set of option tires for every round of quali? That way you get one more set for Q2, if you reach it, and if you reach Q3, you get one more set again, for that part of quali. It only makes sense. And do away with the rule of starting a race on a tyre on which you’ve set your fastest time.

  5. HoHum (@hohum) said on 12th March 2014, 19:10

    Sounds like another FIA own goal to me also, it still leaves the drivers that don’t make it into Q3 with an extra set of brand new option tyres. Perhaps they are looking for a way to handicap by the back door.
    It should be fairly easy to come up with these regulations in a manner that does not advantage slower cars nor disadvantage faster cars, and vice-versa, but the FIA and Bernie seem to be constantly overcomplicating things to achieve some secret objective of their own.

    • Mike (@mike) said on 12th March 2014, 22:12

      it still leaves the drivers that don’t make it into Q3 with an extra set of brand new option tyres.

      How so?

      • if you use the extra set in Q3 you have to give it back
        25.4.a (…) One set of “option” specification tyres may only be used during Q3, by those cars that qualified for Q3, and must be returned to the tyre supplier before the start of the race.
        but if you don’t make it to Q3 you have the extra set for the race!
        25.4.a (…) One set of “option” specification tyres, which were allocated to cars which did not qualify for Q3, may only be used during the race.

        I don’t like that bit!

      • HoHum (@hohum) said on 13th March 2014, 13:47

        @mike, did you read the article?

    • “It should be fairly easy to come up with these regulations in a manner that does not advantage slower cars nor disadvantage faster cars, and vice-versa, but the FIA and Bernie seem to be constantly overcomplicating things to achieve some secret objective of their own.”

      Secret objective? The whole qualifying-tyre situation was clearly invented for the explicit purpose of disadvantaging the top 10, by making them start the race on worn tyres and removing the possibility of an option/prime choice. IMO, it hasn’t really worked, because 1 hot lap + 2 in/out laps isn’t enough to make a significant difference.

  6. Mads (@mads) said on 12th March 2014, 19:11

    Why does it have to be so terribly complicated?
    Let the drivers who start Q3 replace a set of tyres, used only in Q3, with a brand new set of the same compound. And then let them start on whatever they like.
    That would encourage running in Q3, allow for more variety in what compound they start the race on, and it would be pretty straight forward.

  7. andae23 (@andae23) said on 12th March 2014, 19:13

    First of all, this is a great example of the FIA overcomplicating things to make their vision work. It would be better to remove the ‘start on the set of tyres you qualified on’ altogether, but instead they insist on making things even more confusing than they already are.

    Secondly, the new rules will move the problem from Q3 to Q2: the midfield teams will not want to risk running too fast in case they might have to start on a scrub set of tyres. The frontrunner teams will do their utmost best to only just make it into Q3, so they have the best tyres as possible at the start of the race. As a result, the first 13 minutes of Q2 will see no running at all, while the last 2 minutes will see all drivers running.

    • HoHum (@hohum) said on 12th March 2014, 19:19

      @andae23, you’r right, probably it’s all to do with not admitting to having made a bad rule to start with, couldn’t lose face now, could they?

    • Better the midfield than the front runners honestly

    • petebaldwin (@petebaldwin) said on 12th March 2014, 22:35

      @andae23 – To an extent but it does work much better having it affect Q2 than Q3. You had cars not running at all so that they could start on brand new tyres. If you don’t run in Q2 now, you’ll qualify right at the back so it’s not an option.

      If midfield teams go slow to start on newer tyres, it’s not a huge loss. I hated seeing teams like Toro Rosso do a great job to get into Q3 and then now run at all…

      Obviously sacking off the rule in general would be better but if it has to stay, I’d rather it in Q2.

  8. petebaldwin (@petebaldwin) said on 12th March 2014, 19:16

    Extra set of tyres makes sense for Q3 but I cannot understand the concept of them having to start the race on their Q2 tyres…. Why!?

    I’m not massively against it as I don’t really think it makes much difference but I just don’t understand the reason for doing it!

    • RandyMandy (@randymandy) said on 13th March 2014, 4:58

      Last season ,teams like Merceds and Redbull sometimes used only prime tyres in Q2 to save all the options for Q3 and race.
      So this year, they have to use options in Q2 if they want to start the race on option tyres. This is good for teams having clear qualifying advantage as they can easily reach q3 on options without the need to push much on those tyres and then they can push even more in Q3 without worrying about damaging those tyres in their Q3 laps.

  9. Easy to understand really, they want to encourage teams to go for pole rather than sit on tires. In most cases, the q2 tires will only have a couple of laps on them. The teams that get into the back half of q3 usually put a fresh set on to get there and that is why they sit out q3, not much to gain everything to lose. By making them start on q2 tires, they take away the incentive to sit, both with the free set of tires and the fact that 11 and back will be pushing from behind on new tires. The fact that it was advantageous to start 10th on new tires rather than 7th on old ones has been negated and im all for it. The rule might have unintended consequences, as in the extra set for the race enabling 11th and back to run longer stints and having fresher tires at the end, but that was going on anyway. The problem was front running cars backing off in the first stint to negate that advantage. IE the mercs in Monaco

  10. In_Silico (@insilico) said on 12th March 2014, 19:19

    I’m not a huge fan of Q3 now being 12 minutes long, as on most track’s each driver will most likely be able to do 3 flying laps at the most. I’ve always felt that a big challenge of qualifying is that you have limited time to really put down a quick lap, i.e only 2 laps. It’s not a change I would have implemented.

    • Mike Dee (@mike-dee) said on 12th March 2014, 19:25

      I think the problem is at Spa where it is very difficult for 10 drivers to set two flying laps when the whether is wet. Last year’s pole was just over 2 minutes. This means 2:15 minutes outlap, 2 minutes flying lap, 2:15 minutes inlap, ~1 minute refuelling and 2:15 minutes outlap need to be completed in 10 minutes. This is just doable for one driver. If you have 10 drivers, all trying to find some space, it is impossible.

    • BasCB (@bascb) said on 12th March 2014, 19:36

      In part its because of how the hybrid part allows you to use a lot of energy in one lap, but only recharges that amount over 2 laps – so if you use the maximum for a hot lap, you cannot immediately do another hot lap.

  11. Mike Dee (@mike-dee) said on 12th March 2014, 19:19

    This might encourage teams that would normally make it to starting position 9 or 10 to only try to be 11th fastest in Q2.

  12. Racer (@racer) said on 12th March 2014, 19:21

    I have a better idea, just let all the drivers start on whatever tyres they want.

  13. StefMeister (@stefmeister) said on 12th March 2014, 19:29

    Changes to Q1/3 session length seems a bit pointless, I don’t recall there been a situation with teams struggling to do 2 runs in Q3 when it’s been 10mins.

    If there so desperate to see all 10 cars run in Q3 despite the fact we won’t see them all on TV anyway, Just take away the rule forcing anybody to start on the tyres they qualify on & give everyone in Q3 2 brand new sets of soft’s. Simple!

  14. Guy (@sudd) said on 12th March 2014, 19:54

    I’m not sure which way to lean on this. Lets wait and see how it works on track. It could just work. However, I don’t think Q3 needs to be extended. Just shorten Q1 alone. The problem in Q3 is not a lack of time, its trying to time yourself to be the last driver to cross the line. Doesn’t matter if its 10 or 12 minutes, you’re just trying to get that minuscule advantage for being the last car on track. You could give them an hour and they won’t go for maximum attack until the final 2-3 minutes.

  15. BrawnGP said on 12th March 2014, 19:58

    …and the jokes keep on coming courtesy of the fia

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