Hamilton denies Ricciardo dream home pole position

2014 Australian Grand Prix qualifying

Daniel Ricciardo, Red Bull, Albert Park, 2014The cars may not make as much noise as they used to but the Melbourne crowd more than made up for that when, for a few fleeting moments, it looked like their home driver was going to get pole position.

The chequered flag was already out in Q3 when Daniel Ricciardo, bravely risking intermediate tyres on a wet track, went fastest in his Red Bull.

But seconds later Lewis Hamilton arrived to spoil the party and give Mercedes the pole position everyone expected them to start the season with.

An action-packed qualifying session saw rain showers, a world champion in the barriers and some impressive rookie performances.

Q1

With the track dry but the skies darkening the drivers were eager to take to the track as qualifying began. Some were queued up at the pit lane exit including the two Mercedes drivers.

Nico Rosberg was advised to let Hamilton leave first – the rules state that the first driver to arrive in the queue has priority – and the team also warned him to set a lap quickly as rain was on its way.

It took a little longer to arrive than expected, giving all the drivers the chance to set a time in dry conditions. The only one who failed to take advantage was Pastor Maldonado, though from the difficulty he was having with the Lotus you’d have been forgiven for thinking the track was wet.

Romain Grosjean was also struggling in the other Lotus. Even before the rain arrived the pair looked likely to be the two slowest qualifiers.

Aside from Lotus’s struggles Q3 had a familiar look. Both Marussias failed to make it through – though Max Chilton unusually out-qualified Jules Bianchi – and Marcus Ericsson’s Caterham also failed to progress.

Team mate Kamui Kobayashi, however, bounced back from the team’s dire problems on Friday to take his car into Q2.

Drivers eliminated in Q1

17 Max Chilton Marussia-Ferrari 1’34.293
18 Jules Bianchi Marussia-Ferrari 1’34.794
19 Esteban Gutierrez Sauber-Ferrari 1’35.117
20 Marcus Ericsson Caterham-Renault 1’35.157
21 Romain Grosjean Lotus-Renault 1’36.993
22 Pastor Maldonado Lotus-Renault

Q2

Rain was not what most drivers wanted as they contemplated their first qualifying session of the year on a parkland circuit in new cars with brutal power delivery and often unpredictable braking characteristics.

The latter definitely applied at Toro Rosso, whose drivers had struggled with their brakes in practice. Jean-Eric Vergne was particularly apprehensive ahead of Q2.

It turned out he needn’t have been. Remarkably, both Toro Rosso drivers claimed a place in Q3, including rookie Daniil Kvyat.

Both Williams drivers also progressed though Valtteri Bottas found the conditions a handful, sliding off at turn nine and then spinning at turn one – though the latter happened moments after he set fastest time.

With conditions improving rapidly towards the end of the session the timing of the final laps was crucial. While Fernando Alonso took the fastest time in the Ferrari team mate Kimi Raikkonen caught traffic at the end of his lap and could only manage eighth.

His attempt to improve further was scuppered when his car got away from him at turn four. The Ferrari wiped its nose off against the barrier and with most of the other drivers already ahead of him and on their last laps, Raikkonen was doomed to elimination.

He wasn’t the only world champion to miss the cut. Jenson Button, three times a winner at the Melbourne track, was also knocked out – though his team initially misinformed him that he’d made it into Q3.

But the biggest surprise was Sebastian Vettel. While team mate Ricciardo frequently popped up near the top of the times the reigning world champion could only manage 13th.

Drivers eliminated in Q2

11 Jenson Button McLaren-Mercedes 1’44.437
12 Kimi Raikkonen Ferrari 1’44.494
13 Sebastian Vettel Red Bull-Renault 1’44.668
14 Adrian Sutil Sauber-Ferrari 1’45.655
15 Kamui Kobayashi Caterham-Renault 1’45.867
16 Sergio Perez Force India-Mercedes 1’47.293

Q3

Further rain fell as the extended 12-minute Q3 shoot-out began, leading most drivers to take to the track on wet weather tyres. Alonso was an exception: he started the session on intermediates but switched to wet weather tyres for his final run.

But Alonso didn’t figure in the fight for pole position. That was conducted between the Mercedes drivers as expected and – surprisingly – Ricciardo’s Red Bull. He put intermediate tyres on for his final run, indicating the Red Bull wants for nothing in the area of downforce.

Rosberg went off at turn nine shortly after beginning his first run. The time lost hear would cost him later – he completed his final lap moments after the chequered flag came out, while Ricciardo and Hamilton had just begun their final runs on an improving track.

Massa’s Williams nearly got away from him on the curved run to turn ten. But the same area caught out Daniil Kvyat who clipped the barrier in his Toro Rosso. Fortunately for his rivals, the yellow flags were not needed.

Ricciardo hesitated slightly at the final corner, feeling a strange sensation at the front of the car which he thought might be related to debris, but when he crossed the line and took the fastest time off Rosberg the crowd went crazy.

They were subdued somewhat by Hamilton’s subsequent improvement, which denied Ricciardo his pole position, but a front row start for the Red Bull driver was beyond the team’s expectations heading into the weekend.

Kevin Magnussen also stood out on his debut for McLaren, claiming fourth on the grid having been their only representative in Q3.

Top ten in Q3

1 Lewis Hamilton Mercedes 1’44.231
2 Daniel Ricciardo Red Bull-Renault 1’44.547
3 Nico Rosberg Mercedes 1’44.595
4 Kevin Magnussen McLaren-Mercedes 1’45.745
5 Fernando Alonso Ferrari 1’45.819
6 Jean-Eric Vergne Toro Rosso-Renault 1’45.864
7 Nico Hulkenberg Force India-Mercedes 1’46.030
8 Daniil Kvyat Toro Rosso-Renault 1’47.368
9 Felipe Massa Williams-Mercedes 1’48.079
10 Valtteri Bottas Williams-Mercedes 1’48.147

2014 Australian Grand Prix

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141 comments on Hamilton denies Ricciardo dream home pole position

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  1. Patrick (@paeschli) said on 15th March 2014, 7:39

    First time I heard the new engines by the way. They sound great IMHO, quieter but the sound itself is deeper and more pleasant.

    • Best thing about the new engines? Hearing the roar of the crowd as the drama unfolded. Quieter engines lack the shock and awe factor, but they bring F1 closer to the fans.

      • Patrick (@paeschli) said on 15th March 2014, 8:09

        Yeah but hearing the crowd sheer when Vettel don’t make it into Q3 … I’m not sure I want to hear things like that ^^’ But maybe we ‘ll be closer to the feeling of the fans on track from our TV, which is great indeed.

        On the sound again, I didn’t hear any differences between the engines (Mercedes, Ferrari and Renault) but I will be paying more attention to that tomorrow.

        • Don Simon (@donsimon) said on 15th March 2014, 10:21

          I had a right old barney with a bunch of Australians under the podium in Singapore. They need to grow up. He risks his life for their entertainment and they boo. I’m a LH fan and I would never think of booing another driver.

          • Funkyf1 (@funkyf1) said on 15th March 2014, 11:42

            In response to the booing of Lewis, it was not aimed at Lewis because of dislike, it was because he had just knocked the home boy off the top spot. Daniel has fans as well

          • Jason (@jason12) said on 15th March 2014, 16:55

            It’s strange that ‘civilised’ nations have this culture of booing in a lot of sports.

          • socksolid (@socksolid) said on 15th March 2014, 18:07

            @Jason:
            “It’s strange that ‘civilised’ nations have this culture of booing in a lot of sports.”

            Only “civilized nations have this culture of booing… really? Have you ever been or even seen a football match, motor race or other sporting competition held in any “uncivilized” country? I’m sure you just as much booing in sweden, usa, india, russia, nigeria and sri lanka…

          • Mike (@mike) said on 15th March 2014, 18:21

            @funkyf1

            Australians are not mature about this kinda thing.

        • Prof Kirk (@prof-kirk) said on 15th March 2014, 11:18

          @paeschii

          hearing the crowd sheer when Vettel don’t make it into Q3 … I’m not sure I want to hear things like that

          Next to me During Qually was an Aussie bloke who seemed to know his F1 stuff when he talked. His friend was some British bloke who was openly spoken that he had no clue what was going on.

          When Vettel was confirmed out in Q2, The loud Aussie guy initiated the mockery cheer as Vettel drove by and his British friend asks “What’s wrong with him?” the aussie bloke turns around “Because he’s the German bad guy”

          **sigh..

          • Sport was pretty much invented as a way to compete with other communities (including countries) without killing each other and sparking wars. Getting exasperated at stuff like this is to misunderstand human nature.

            Also i really dont think they’re significantly risking their lives, none has died in 20 years. The danger is no greater than say what a firefighter would face and I’d expect them to take competitive chat on the chin if I was playing rugby or something with one.

            Finally i think the cheering was more just because vetted destroyed webber and hadnt got the best of ricciardo, not necessarily anything to do with vetted you could’ve put any driver in that situation (having beat an outgoing aussie driver and then being out qualified by the new one) and expect a cheer.

        • matt90 said on 15th March 2014, 16:14

          I think cheering a changing of the guard is much better than booing. Far less vindictive to me.

      • The fans were outstanding what a magic saturday!

      • But what happens when we go to Shanghai? When the tracks are deafeningly empty? Brazil will be a dream though!!

      • Banburyhammer (@banburyhammer) said on 15th March 2014, 9:05

        I was only listening on Five Live but the crowd going crazy when Ricciado took pole was great, and you could hear the dissapointment when Hamilton snatched it off him. This could be a massive uninteded consequence of the qieter engines – that you can now hear the buzz, the atmosphere or lack therof of the crowd.

        Silverstone, Monza, Catal and Interlagos will have no problem with that, and Im sure that even with only 50,000 at Spa, the Kemmel Straight is rocking on race day. One of the great experieces in sport is the sound of the crowd react to events on the pitch/arena etc.
        I can imagine that any races (cough Bahrain) that have nobody attending can no longer be glossed over with clever angles as the lack of buzz will be absolutely deafening, and with how bad that comes across on TV, it may force Bernie to actually do something sensible regarding race allocation/fees.

        Hopefully, anyway.

    • nidzovski (@nidzovski) said on 15th March 2014, 8:35

      Same here. First time that I heard the engines and you know what? We are paying too much attention to that habit. I mean of course the engine noise was for a century a big part of car racing but is it the main reason why we like racing? It will take some time to get use to it but F1 was always pioneer in many engineering revolutions so expect the others to follow their example. I mean it could be all electric in the not so far future. What would be our comments than? I love F1 in which ever form it comes.

    • BaKano (@bakano) said on 15th March 2014, 9:14

      There are two things about the noise that is leaving me a bit confused.
      When the cameras are filming the track the noise is not very good and actually reminds me of the “onboard” footage from MotoGP bikes.
      When seeing onboard footage of the cars, the sound is great.

      And there is no doubt the reduced decibels will allow for new experiences. Earlier in Q1 Alonso locked his fronts whilst braking for T1 and it was clearly eared. Never before I have noticed so loudly a locking tire on track!

      • Lucas Wilson (@full-throttle-f1) said on 15th March 2014, 9:49

        Just thinking. After pre-season testing we were likening RB’s 2014 season to Ferrari’s 2005 season. I could be more like Ferrari’s 2006 season.

      • Funkyf1 (@funkyf1) said on 15th March 2014, 11:46

        @bakano I agree totally with your comments, there are many more things that are now audible which is great, but to not be able to hear a car approaching is a concern. Sitting at the end of the main straight the only way I knew a car was coming was by watching the big screen, something I have never had to do before. Not a fan

        • Allan Kobanawa (@allanlol86) said on 15th March 2014, 12:23

          In regards to the sound, I miss the very loud engines from previous years.. I reckon that was the thing about F1. I understand that racing is not about how much noise you make, but many people corelates F1 and big noise and for some people that are not really into F1, they will be “Oh that’s it!? the V8 supercars sounds louder!”.
          Watching my videos from previous years, the sound cannot be compared!

          There was quite a lot of booing to VET today at the circuit.. Well, seems F1 fans are also similar to soccer fans haha

          Today when RIC got provisional pole the crowd went nuts! Subsequently, when HAM got pole, I went nuts only by myself.. hahaha If I were in a soccer stadium standing at the opposite crowd and did that, I might have been in the hospital by now ;P

          Excited for tomorrow’s race!
          Go Lewis! Go Kamui! Go Massa!

    • matt90 (@matt90) said on 15th March 2014, 23:17

      I really think that FOM need to record them better. I know they’re quieter, but often I could barely hear them over the commentators. They aren’t that much quieter, but they seem to be doing a poor job of either catching or playing the audio.

  2. Mitch (@mwyndo7) said on 15th March 2014, 7:40

    Fantastic effort from Dan today, qualifying is his specialty and we saw that today. Now he just needs to keep a cool head in the race and bring home the points.

    • kpcart said on 15th March 2014, 14:07

      why do you say qualifying is his specialty? he will keep a cool head in the race, lets home the Renault engine and ers stay cool so he can finish the race. if it rains, I think he has a chance at the win.

  3. Blackmamba (@blackmamba) said on 15th March 2014, 7:42

    Now that’s how you impress your new boss at your new job. This boy just might ruffle Vettel like Webber never could!

  4. The Blade Runner (@thebladerunner) said on 15th March 2014, 7:43

    Very exciting quali. We’ll worth getting up for!

    Superb drive from Danny but have to mention K-Mag.

  5. craig-o (@craig-o) said on 15th March 2014, 7:43

    Awesome effort by Magnussen today. Like Hakkinen he outqualified his world champion teammate in his first race for McLaren, like Hamilton he puts it in P4 in his first race for McLaren. Meanwhile Perez qualified behind Kobayashi. Perhaps McLaren called it right?

  6. BasCB (@bascb) said on 15th March 2014, 7:44

    I saw someone note on the live blog, how its curious that Magnussen qualified in 4th for his first race at McLaren, just like Hamilton did 7 years ago.

    Also, this session sets up both the race tomorrow and the season nicely. Mercedes seems not to be as far ahead as feared, while Red Bull are not as far off as feared. But Vettel will have something new to worry about if Ricciardo has a good race, because it seems he has met his match in qualifying that Red Bull!

    • dragoll (@dragoll) said on 15th March 2014, 7:48

      @bascb A little difficult to take too much out of todays qualifying from the teams. Most were trying to ‘survive’ the conditions. Rosberg was imho set to take Pole until he ran off at turn 9, but that is why this is a sport, because at the end of the day anything can happen.

      • BasCB (@bascb) said on 15th March 2014, 7:51

        I am sure that the wet helped the Renault engined cars for qualifying, because when its wet and you can’t get the power down, having less of it is not so much of a problem @dragoll. I read that Hamilton did his lap mostly in the top gears, showing how he was not comfortable appying the torque. I agree that had it been dry we would have most likely have seen a Ros-Ham front row quite a bit clear of the rest.

        • dragoll (@dragoll) said on 15th March 2014, 7:59

          I watched HAM’s pole lap, he was very much on the edge of adhesion, all credit to him for getting the pole, he did well :)

        • Jeanrien (@jeanrien) said on 15th March 2014, 8:35

          @bascb To complete the difference dry-wet … important mention to cooling, much more effective when moisture in the air (or wet) probably limiting overheating and bringing the engine back toghether (also due to unavailable full power as you mentioned)

      • Jason (@jason12) said on 15th March 2014, 17:10

        1:0 in Quali in favour of HAM so far.

        Let’s see what happens at Bahrain in the next race.

    • OneBHK (@onebhk) said on 15th March 2014, 11:44

      @bascb Let’s not compare Magnussen with Hamilton, who had more than 22,000 km in testing in a F1 car, prior to his first GP

    • 72defender (@72defender) said on 15th March 2014, 13:35

      I disagree with your assessment about the performance deficit. Had it been dry conditions the Mercedes would have stormed to pole by a very comfortable margin.

      • kpcart said on 15th March 2014, 14:09

        which shows the drivers in their squad are not the best, to be split by ricciardo…

      • BasCB (@bascb) said on 15th March 2014, 16:09

        Well, but if it had been dry than its pretty likely that the Williams would have been far closer @72defender and likely Alonso could have come a bit closer too. As for the race – apart from not knowing much about who uses more fuel, I do think that Mercedes are likely to have a solid long run pace advantage.

    • Mashiat (@) said on 15th March 2014, 17:16

      Magnussen did better than Hamilton did in 2007 because in those days, it was a McLaren and Ferrari front 2 rows 90% of the time unless of course in special circumtances. And the McLaren was way better than the 3rd best car. And if memory serves, Lewis wasn’t fuelled too much.

  7. Tyler (@tdog) said on 15th March 2014, 7:46

    Brilliant to watch live, being in the stands when Dan briefly went to P1 was an incredible experience.

  8. Ean (@ean) said on 15th March 2014, 7:46

    My prediction a month ago that Red Bull will be on the front row came true and I wonder what the people that wrote sarcastic remarks on that say now , Kvyat , Riccardo and Magnussen were the real stars

  9. gpr (@rajesh) said on 15th March 2014, 7:47

    such a pity that the author chose not to write how vettel was eliminated, be impartial….. “But the biggest surprise was Sebastian Vettel. While team mate Ricciardo frequently popped up near the top of the times the reigning world champion could only manage 13th.”

    • dragoll (@dragoll) said on 15th March 2014, 7:50

      @rajesh I’ve seen 2 interviews with VET himself, and another 3 with RIC post Qualy and none of them know why… A little rough, its not like RAI who binned it.

    • Rory said on 15th March 2014, 7:54

      You are kidding right? Vettel looked uncertain the whole session. Kimi’s off did not play a part.

    • nackavich (@nackavich) said on 15th March 2014, 8:11

      I sat at turns 1-2 and Vettel seemed not to get on the power as confidently, and the car was very unstable compared to Dan, who’s throttle application was beautiful out of turn 1.
      Obviously a setup issue, but I haven heard any of the interviews.

      • Patrick (@paeschli) said on 15th March 2014, 8:27

        Vettel is a good guy, despite what people think of him. I think he doesn’t want to say something like “It’s the team’s fault, they messed up my setup.”

      • BasCB (@bascb) said on 15th March 2014, 16:12

        Its rather more likely that his car ran into some kind of trouble because in Q1 Vettel was pretty much there or thereabouts, but in Q2 he was just nowhere compared to the other car, sliding all over, having to correct and seeming to be unsure of himself @nackavich

  10. djdaveyp85 (@djdaveyp87) said on 15th March 2014, 7:48

    Might rhyme a lot here…

    But I have to say..

    I’m a fan of Dan, he was the man in Qualifying.

    Rhyming aside I am a total Hamilton fanboy. I’m hyped about Ham’s pole but man Dan’s performance impressed me most today. And that smile, you can’t hate anybody that smiles like that!

  11. Bruno said on 15th March 2014, 7:49

    Vettel on Q2? Williams on the points zone? Two rookies at Q1? Well, thats some good news for F1 2014 folks, this year going to be a hell of a championship! The turbos noises are amazing, btw! Can’t wait sunday!

  12. Red Andy (@red-andy) said on 15th March 2014, 7:53

    All the fuss about Renault-powered cars and we get three of them in the top ten. The woes of Lotus seem to be about more than just the engines…

    Though I suppose the big test will be how they perform in race trim. Lots of unknowns. I feel like we know no more than we did at the end of testing.

    • dragoll (@dragoll) said on 15th March 2014, 7:57

      I think the woes of Lotus began with their money problems late 2013. They’re not just 1 month behind, they’re a long way behind because they couldn’t develop their car.

    • Patrick (@paeschli) said on 15th March 2014, 8:01

      3 Renault engines in the top 10, only one Ferrari … which engine is a dog now? :)

    • Eric Morman (@lethalnz) said on 15th March 2014, 8:05

      we know one thing and that the top drivers are the ones that can drive the pants off a car when needed,
      the rest are not happy when it comes to having to perform above the car rather than just push it to the limit of the designer.

    • OneBHK (@onebhk) said on 15th March 2014, 11:49

      @red-andy I reiterate, Australian GP throws throws up anomalies regularly… Wait till China to see the first real glimpse of the pecking order

    • BasCB (@bascb) said on 15th March 2014, 16:17

      It seems that Red Bull is not far off the truth when they mention being down on power but having good downforce. The rain seemed to make that downforce advantage a bonus and with power not mattering that much because no one was able to fully use that in the slippery conditions anyway they were suddenly there (well, not they, rather Ricciardo and the STR to an extent). I guess its safe to say that both the STR and the RBR will be very good once they get their power unit to work better with their cars.

      As for Lotus, yeah that is looking bad. Maldonado was slipping around just like everybody else was doing in Q2 but during the dry part of Q1! That car is defenitely far from ready.

  13. Alan Miller (@alanmiller) said on 15th March 2014, 7:57

    Well disappointed with Vettel’s qualification. Although there have been some rumor running about that the engine mapping software went to pot.

    Really happy to see Daniel really push that RB10 and show his true skill! I predict (although tentatively) that RBR are well in the running for the WCC by driver quality alone. I feel a little more secure in that the RB10 isn’t looking quite like the dog that it was predicted to be.

  14. Patrick (@paeschli) said on 15th March 2014, 8:00

    To explain Riccirado surprise qualifying, could it be he is more used to running a car that struggles a bit coming from a Toro Rosso with less downforce?

    • Eric Morman (@lethalnz) said on 15th March 2014, 8:11

      your onto it Patrick,
      the impression is the cars need to be driven not just pushed to the limit of the design,
      it has been such a long time coming, at last we can see the driver who can drive the pants of a car, this season will show possibly the best drivers up front rather than the best cars.

      • Patrick (@paeschli) said on 15th March 2014, 8:24

        I agree with you, but this doesn’t prove Vettel is not a good driver yet. His car is more than 2 seconds of Ricciardo’s pace and that isn’t normal, I believe Horner when he says there something wrong on Seb’s car.

        However it could be really strange with Ricciardo taking the championship this year ^^

        It’s a pleasure to see the drivers struggling with the car like that, I’m all in for 2014.

        • Junpei (@junpei) said on 15th March 2014, 14:37

          I think the championship is much more about the mental pressure. Being the underdog has the luxury of no pressure. Being a championship contender could be much more stressful especially if someone’s breathing down your neck. Remember the Massa-Hamilton or Vettel-Alonso fights recently, when any mistake could tip the balance towards the other. It was probably 2 teams and 2 drivers having heart-attacks at every corner in those last few months.

          Also, I’m not a fan of double points, unfair to the smaller teams, but from a driver’s perspective it should really be steadily increasing points in every upcoming race. But that would only work nicely if all the cars were the same and only driver ability and development would matter.

        • Junpei (@junpei) said on 15th March 2014, 14:40

          And let’s not forget my favourite, Schumacher’s last season at Ferrari. The second half of that season made me like Schumacher, when I was never a fan before.

    • McKenzie (@mckenzie) said on 15th March 2014, 17:12

      @paeschli – After the qualy was over, Alan McNish (in the BBC highlights) compared Vettel’s driving with Ricciardo’s. He did this by looking at onboard footage of both drivers in the cockpit.

      Vettel was clearly fighting the car, judging by the way he was working the wheel. Ricciardo, on the other hand, was much smoother and he seemed to have much less need to correct the car through steering inputs.

      Quite what that means is impossible to say. We’ve heard that Vettel’s car suffered from a software issue and that may explain the difference in styles – on this occasion. Regardless of the reason for the difference in the styles of the two drivers, there was no doubt that they were very different in the footage shown by McNish. Ricciardo seemed to be able to coax the car through the corners without any untoward sliding around: Vettel had his hands full.

      So you could be right; maybe Ricciardo’s previous experience is a factor. I don’t think it was just the wet conditions that caught Vettel out. We know Vettel can drive well in wet conditions. I suspect Ricciardo is better suited to this style of driving – low downforce.

        • McKenzie (@mckenzie) said on 15th March 2014, 19:23

          I’d have to collect it on behalf of Alan McNish @full-throttle-f1 :b His analysis was pretty good.

          Vettel was certainly struggling with the car whereas Ricciardo was not. Can’t be the wet weather because Vettel drives well in the wet and Ricciardo didn’t find the car nearly as much of a handful as Vettel did. Unless Vettel’s car had a software problem that affected the handling, Ricciardo seemed to be the better driver today. Apart from possible wonky software, both drivers were driving the same car in the same conditions, albeit Vettel’s set up might have been radically different.

          If the cars were set up (roughly) the same, and Vettel’s software issue wasn’t significant to the handling of his car, Ricciardo seems to have driven much better than Vettel did today. McNish’s comparison showed the difference in style quite clearly.

  15. Jack (@jmc200) said on 15th March 2014, 8:01

    The first round of the fascinating inter-team battles. As I expected, Hulk smashed Perez, Alonso made a mockery of Kimi and Kobayashi did a great job. The rookies all did such a good job! The Lotus is a dog, holy crap.

    • Mashiat (@) said on 15th March 2014, 8:39

      Yeah. I wonder where all the people that kept saying “Alonso will know what it feels like to be Number 2″ and “Kimi will definitely out-qualify Alonso as he is better over one lap” have gone. Gone to cover their faces in shame presumably

      • Jay Menon (@jaymenon10) said on 15th March 2014, 9:23

        Haha..thats exactly what I said. Where are all the Alonso haters now? He’s wiped the floor (ok thats probably a bit much)..with Kimi so far. Having said that, Ferrari is not quick enough, as usual. When will they ever start with a quick car? Sigh…

      • evered7 (@evered7) said on 15th March 2014, 9:26

        I think most of it was wishful thinking. But Kimi is not yet comfortable with the car and I believe he will push Alonso more than Massa ever did in qualifying as well as in the race.

        Will need to wait for the European leg to start to see the trend arising.

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