Todt scraps budget cap plans for 2015

F1 Fanatic Round-up

F1F CSIn the round-up: Jean Todt admits that the FIA will not enforce a budget cap in 2015 as originally planned.

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Formula 1 cost cap plans abandoned according to FIA’s Jean Todt (Autosport)

Todt: “Most of the teams were in favour of the cost cap, but I understand that all the teams that are part of the Strategy Group are against it now. So clearly, if the commercial rights holder, and if six teams, which means 12 of 18 are against, I cannot impose it. It’s mathematics. So in this case, no more cost cap.”

Jean Todt, Christian Horner, Helmut Marko, Bahrain International Circuit, 2014

F1 bosses agree to look into ways to increase engine noise (Autosport)

“After a series of meetings over the Bahrain Grand Prix weekend to discuss the current state of F1, Autosport understands that unanimous agreement was reached for action to be taken regarding the noise. A working group is to be set up by the FIA to look into the matter, with a view of making sure that the turbo noise can increase as soon as possible.”

McLaren boss Ron Dennis urges squabbling F1 to respect the future (Sky)

Dennis: “There has to be a time, and I think that time is now, when we take a more socially-responsible position. The simple fact is that we live in a world where resources are depleting and the environment is being threatened. Yes, we are Formula 1, yes we are the pinnacle of motorsport, but being the pinnacle of motorsport means we have to have the latest technology”

‘We were not good enough – Vettel (ESPN)

Vettel: “It’s a shame we couldn’t get further up because Daniel proved there was a little bit more to get. I couldn’t really get to that bit so I’m not happy with my day. For some reason we seem to be very slow down the straights, and not just against the Mercs. We pushed hard… but obviously we were not good enough today.”

Exclusive Vijay Mallya Q&A: It’s great to break our podium jinx!

Mallya: “It is a very special moment. My job was always to make this team climb up the ladder – steadily. I always believed that 2014 – with all the new regulations – gave us a new opportunity. And so far what a good season it has been!”

Button says McLaren now second to Mercedes (Racer)

Button: “The only team that was quicker than us today was the Mercedes, Force India was obviously competitive, but I think we would have fought them very well at the end but we didn’t get the opportunity.”

FIA president resists demand for rule changes (BBCF1)

Jean Todt: “Do you hear [championship leader] Nico Rosberg complaining? Did you hear [world champion] Sebastian Vettel complaining last year? Those doing well aren’t complaining, those that aren’t, are.”

Honda and Ford could power new F1 teams in 2015 (Racecar Engineering)

“Meanwhile the Haas Automation entry could utilise Ford branded Cosworth engines, the English firm has recently opened a new office in Detroit and developed its own power unit for the 2014 season, but refused to put it into production without [an original equipment manufacturer] partner.”

Screw you Guys, I’m going home (The Buxton Blog)

“One wonders why Ferrari and Red Bull are suddenly so concerned over the opinions of the fans, when every poll conducted in the independent domain over double points repeatedly sees well over a 95% dislike of the rule, and yet they have not seen fit to push for its eradication.”

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Comment of the day

With yesterday’s thrilling Bahrain Grand Prix set to become one of the most popular races ever on ‘Rate the Race’, jonny705 feels that despite the drama, it wasn’t quite deserving of a full ten out of ten…

I think people are getting slightly carried away with the rating, probably (and understandably so) because it’s been so long since we’ve had any real battle for the lead and such brilliant drama up and down the field.

But it’s almost as if we’ve forgotten how good F1 can really get.

This was a Grand Prix jam-packed with action, tension, drama from start to finish. Team mates flouting the pleas of their superiors, two different approaches to strategy that kept us guessing throughout the race’s entirety, and a spectacular crash that hopefully sends a message to the FIA that changing the shape of the noses won’t deny us fans the occasional amazing sight of a flying/flipping/barrel-rolling car. You can’t ask for much more.

But was it as good as Brazil 2012? Not quite. Plenty of on-track drama, but it lacked that extra spice – a championship wasn’t at stake, and final-race showdowns will always have that added bit of tension (or at least they did before they messed with the points).

Was it as good as Canada 2011? Nowhere near. That is the definition of a race that had pretty much everything you could ask for.

A 10/10 race is one where you get a special feeling inside, one that tells you that you’ve just watched something very special. Think long and hard, did you get that feeling as Hamilton crossed the line? If the answer is yes, you need to go and watch one of the two aforementioned races. If not, it’s because this race was a very good 9/10. Excellent Grand Prix, but to make it a 10 it needs something truly sensational – a driver coming back from nowhere, for example.
jonny705

From the forum

Happy birthday!

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On this day in F1

McLaren won their second race in a row at the start of the 1984 season 30 years ago today, Niki Lauda leading home team mate Alain Prost at Kyalami. Derek Warwick was third for Renault, a lap down.

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113 comments on Todt scraps budget cap plans for 2015

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  1. Tyler (@tdog) said on 7th April 2014, 0:57

    Personally, if Haas make it to the 2015 grid I think they would be mad not to try to secure the Mercedes engines that McLaren will be giving up (assuming Merc is happy to keep supplying 4 teams).

    • BJ (@beejis60) said on 7th April 2014, 3:40

      @tdog I believe Haas has ties with Ferrari here in the states and I believe that was in their proposition to use their PU’s, however, I do agree with you in the necessity to pick up that empty Merc supply slot being vacated.

      • BasCB (@bascb) said on 7th April 2014, 10:51

        Yeah, I understood his intention had been to go for package with a Ferrari engine and Dallarra chassis (almost next door to Ferrari for good cooperation) too @beejis60, but I guess that with current engine competitiveness, they would be crazy not to have a look at getting Mercedes engines.

        But who knows, they could end up with Ferrari still, or indeed lure Ford (Cosworth built) back, as Racecar engineering hints at

    • OOliver said on 7th April 2014, 7:28

      I read somewhere that Haas was aiming for 2016.

  2. OmarR-Pepper (@omarr-pepper) said on 7th April 2014, 1:23

    Last year, even when Vettel won a GP, I rarely gave 10/10 (especially when he ran far ahead alone, that’s not a 10/10). Before that, even with battles for the lead, I rarely gave 10/10. Today the race (as far as I read about it, honestly I just saw the 1st lap and the period after the safety car) I saw that the “race” was divided in Ham vs Rosberg and the rest. i understand Ham fans are amazed, and his was definitely a great drive against a tough teammate, but I agree with the COTD: While the other teams mess up far behind, race won’t be 10/10. Mercedes is now 11/10 (my honest congrats to Mercedes), but every race is becoming as Indy 2005, when the Ferraris flew and th Jordans and Minardis fought for leftovers. This season is Indy 2005 with 2 real racing cars and 20 privileged spectators.

    • Mike (@mike) said on 7th April 2014, 2:27

      It was a great race. If you are only interested in who wins then for sure. It’s a 1 on 1. But that’s doing a huge disservice to the sport, where the best racing is often in the midfield.

    • Aditya F. Yahya (@adityafakhri) said on 7th April 2014, 3:42

      I’m one of the guys who rated 10/10, and maybe I get too carried away with the amazement that I didn’t feel for quite long time. I mean, what is best GP last year? British? When the tyre is like ‘boom boom’ everywhere?
      Despite the domination of Mercedes, both their driver is still racing hard. The rest of the field is also packed with good performance of Force India, Red Bull, and Williams. not forget to mention the moment when Maldonado crashed into Guti, which is quite frightening.
      Personal emotion for me isn’t always when your favorite driver winning in fashioned style (i.e. Kimi, Suzuka 2005) or mega closing race (i.e. Brazil 2008 and 2012), but also when the racing like this is happened: what grand prix should be like.
      Whether it’s 9 or 10 is too close to call I admit, but is it really matter when you got racing like this?

      • frood19 (@frood19) said on 7th April 2014, 10:44

        the best race last year was malaysia, but people got too wrapped in the team orders thing that the rating was low. brazil 2012 was awesome (partly because david coulthard used the line: “Vettel’s coming into a wet box”), but it kind of fizzled out when hulk crashed, everyone started letting vettel through (thanks schumacher…), and we had the safety car, so i don’t think that race was as good as yesterday’s. brazil 2008 on the other hand…

    • Keith Campbell (@keithedin) said on 7th April 2014, 8:42

      @omarr-pepper “I just saw the 1st lap and the period after the safety car”

      I don’t think you can really critisize people for voting it a 10/10 when you didn’t even see most of the race. It was fantastic stuff throughout (although i missed a lot too from watching highlights only). Each to their own, but personally i think complaining that there was no racing between 2nd and 3rd places is being pretty fussy on what constitutes a ‘great race’.

    • Cosmas (@cosmas) said on 7th April 2014, 10:06

      For the past 4 years most people complained about RBs superiority that made races boring.
      Vettel WHEN he was winning was most of the times 0.1-0.3sec per lap quicker.
      This year the mercs in this 3 first races where 1-3sec quicker than any other team.
      That is 10 times more. So the wtc is already over.
      Yesterday ROS failed to take advantage of a unique opotunity since luck gifted him 10sec and a better tyre. This was a clear message who is the fastest guy in the team and who 99.99% will be the WDC.
      Looking at the odds in a betting site leaves no space for any doubt:
      http://www.skybet.com/formula-1/formula-1-2014-season
      Ham winning the wtc has an odd of 0.53 and mercedes 0.08!!!! has this ever happen again?? in any sport??
      After all this in mind , depsite a race with so much action and overtakes, how can anybody be optimistic that this season would be exciting and worth watching?
      This is good only for mercedes and Hamilton fans.
      FIA changed the rules in the past to slow down RB more than once, why is it so bad and unfair to make the same to the mercs?

      • Mersault said on 7th April 2014, 13:35

        This is total nonsense. Vettel’s dominance was boring because most of the time only he was in the dominant position. And on the rare occasions that wasn’t true, Red Bull imposed (or at least tried to impose) team orders.

      • Nick (@npf1) said on 7th April 2014, 15:44

        So the wtc is already over.

        God forbid something interesting happens that isn’t for the lead/the championship!

        Is Chilton making an amazing overtake on Kobayashi less impressive than Rosberg passing Vettel with DRS?

        You people do my head in…

    • JCost (@jcost) said on 7th April 2014, 14:08

      @omarr-pepper I rated the race 9 because it was a all-Mercedes affair at the front but it had a very important ingredient for a good race: Drama. That’s why Canada 2011 was epic and that’s why Brazil 2008 was the best season finale and one of the best races I’ve ever see.

    • Max Jacobson (@vettel1) said on 7th April 2014, 14:55

      I do also agree with comment of the day, though not necessarily on Canada 2011. Absolutely, it was a very, very good race but the red flag period is what robbed it from being a 10 in my opinion (and too many safety cars). It falls into the high 9 category I feel, along with Bahrain.

      Fully agreed on Brazil 2012 though. And as other races in recent times go, Brazil 2008 perhaps and Japan 2005.

    • Breno (@austus) said on 8th April 2014, 0:37

      If you didnt watch it, why are you saying it wasnt good? Is the race basically just the leader, nothign else matters? Tell that to Hamilton, how he won his title by finishing 4th.

  3. Tenerifeman (@tenerifeman) said on 7th April 2014, 1:26

    Haas and Honda? That’s the route I would take if I was Haas.

    • G Breese (@breesegp) said on 7th April 2014, 11:33

      @tenerifeman that option won’t be open to them until at least 2016 as mclaren have an exclusive deal with Honda for 2015, so if they do join next year and want Honda they’re going to have to find a supplier to fill the 1 year gap

    • Paul A (@paul-a) said on 7th April 2014, 19:23

      Remember the 1964 season? The first Honda engine in F1 — a v12 mounted transversely — 5-10% up on power over the competition, but bad on reliability, mostly overheating. Reminds me of 2014…

  4. trotter said on 7th April 2014, 1:39

    Is has to be said, regarding the personal opinion of how emotionally immersive the race was, it really depends on what part your favorite driver played. As much as people are trying to be objective when rating races, the last bit, that emotional aspect, will always depend on what part your favorite driver played. For Alonso’s or Vettel’s fans, this was probably very exciting race to watch, but not emotionally immersive.

    That said, some races really feel like history in the making. One of those I can remember was back in 2005 when I think Alonso really announced himself. He already had a win in 2003 and numerous pole positions by then, already leading the championship after 4 races and 3 wins, but Imola 2005 was something else. I wasn’t even his fan back then but I was left with a sense of witnessing something monumental. Kimi’s win at Suzuka that same year was awesome, and even thought he was my fav driver at the time, I didn’t really feel that excited. Maybe because the championship was over or because it was more of a comeback than a real fight for the lead, but that’s just how I personally experienced it. One other I remember was Spa 2000. When I saw that overtake, I was breathless, left with a feeling that this was too good to be real. Almost choreographed.

    Today’s race was amazing and battles were really thrilling. I’m sure today’s race was really the edge of a seat stuff for Lewis’ fans, but I think that 9 is a realistic mark, while 10 will always require a personal, emotional drain of surviving a monumental battle with your favorite driver, against their arch-nemesis. Ideally in a title-deciding cliffhanger. :)

    • matt90 (@matt90) said on 7th April 2014, 1:53

      I get that. Hamilton is the driver I support most, so felt that way today. It felt like it might carry championship weight too, as it could prove to be important for shaping it. As it is likely to come down to these 2, a race where Hamilton snatched a win from Rosberg felt important, even early in the season. A 14 point swing and the momentum it gives could be quite meaningful, and considering the problem Hamilton had in Australia it felt somewhat redemptive.

    • In_Silico (@insilico) said on 7th April 2014, 1:55

      That doesn’t apply to me really because I’m a fan of all drivers. Yes maybe there are a few which I perhaps like more than others, but in every race or season, I just want to see great close racing and be entertained, regardless or who comes out on top – (the only time that changes is when a driver is dominating, whether that be the case in a race where he’s miles in the lead or over the course of the season). Overall when watching F1 or any other sport, there are two main things which I want it to be. Close and entertaining.

      • trotter said on 7th April 2014, 2:22

        You should really let your emotions get out a bit. It really brings the whole sport to life that much more. Sweating in the seat. The crushing disappointment when they lose at the end of a nailbitting season, or the incredible joy when they win in the same circumstances.

    • bull mello (@bullmello) said on 7th April 2014, 3:10

      My favorite drivers did not fare all that well in this Grand Prix and it was still the best race I’ve seen in a long time. In fact, I would rather see a great race like this than to see a boring race that my favorite driver wins.

      • trotter said on 7th April 2014, 3:40

        I would rather see a great race like this than to see a boring race that my favorite driver wins.

        I would rather see you read what I said and process it, before replying like this to it, because I said something completely different.

        • HoHum (@hohum) said on 7th April 2014, 4:24

          @trotter, yes, you said something different, are we only allowed to express opinions that agree with yours? not much point in that.
          I agree totally with @bullmello even though I don’t have a favourite driver atm (but Dan is right up there).

          • trotter said on 7th April 2014, 4:44

            If someone isn’t going to bother to read what you wrote before responding to it, what’s the point of responding to it?

          • HoHum (@hohum) said on 7th April 2014, 5:05

            I’m pretty sure we both read it.

        • bull mello (@bullmello) said on 7th April 2014, 5:54

          @trotter – I read what you said and got it. Then wrote my comment based on what my thoughts were after reading your comment.

          You said, in part:
          Is has to be said, regarding the personal opinion of how emotionally immersive the race was, it really depends on what part your favorite driver played. As much as people are trying to be objective when rating races, the last bit, that emotional aspect, will always depend on what part your favorite driver played

          I said:
          “My favorite drivers did not fare all that well in this Grand Prix and it was still the best race I’ve seen in a long time. In fact, I would rather see a great race like this than to see a boring race that my favorite driver wins.”

          People may have different reasons for level of emotional involvement while watching a sporting event. In any sporting event these days I’m more involved emotionally in the contest quality than whether any team or driver wins. Maybe I just have a different perspective at my age than when I used to get emotionally wrapped around my favorite teams or drivers.

          You said:
          Today’s race was amazing and battles were really thrilling. I’m sure today’s race was really the edge of a seat stuff for Lewis’ fans, but I think that 9 is a realistic mark, while 10 will always require a personal, emotional drain of surviving a monumental battle with your favorite driver, against their arch-nemesis. Ideally in a title-deciding cliffhanger.

          I totally get what you’re saying, for me it’s not that way. For one thing, my truly favorite driver is Jim Clark, but he doesn’t race any more. So, I guess I’ll probably never rate a race a 10 according to your rating system. Actually my rating system is way different than most here and that’s OK, to each his own.

          Anyways, my comprehension level is adequate, my opinion is different than yours. No need to get grumpy about it. :-)

          • trotter said on 7th April 2014, 6:15

            I do agree with what you are saying. To be more precise, I understand and I really see your side of it. Sorry for my grumpiness, but I get a feeling that many people are too obsessed with trying to be as formal and as objective as possible, while it’s really not necessary. Getting carried away with seriousness of the rating. Let it go, relax. That’s why I said that emotions will always play a part and I think they should, or at least, there’s nothing wrong with it. I get a feeling that everyone is a bit to tight up and is acting as if they have to be an impartial judge in a real courtroom instead of relaxing, enjoying and expressing themselves and their emotions. This is a fans’ site and as long as people are civil, there’s no reason to withhold emotions. No one should judge anyone if they feel that race was better just because their fav driver won.

            Regarding Jim Clark, I can see what you are saying. I don’t think I’ll ever support a driver like I support Alonso. To be honest, I’m really sick and tired of F1 politicking and I’m just holding in there with Fernando until he finally gets that third one. After that I really might stop bothering with it because with all this mid-season lobbying, Bernie’s raping of the sport, I get a feeling as if we are in a constant struggle just to sit, relax and enjoy it. I don’t know if I’ll find a driver to really support after Fernando is gone. I started with Senna back in 93, than Schumi, but detested him since that faithful day at Jerez in 97. After that I went back with McLaren, whom I got affection for while watching Senna in 93. Supported Mika wholeheartedly and lost a bit of interest after he retired. 2002 being a walkover didn’t really help. :) I really liked Montoya from the moment he joined and in 2003 really got a new admiration for both him and Kimi, while I saw Alonso as someone who is yet to deliver (since Kimi and Juan) were already in the title fight. Coincidentally, Alonso turned to be a nemesis in 2005 since I was a McLaren and Kimi supporter, but I was definitely in admiration of him. Then with that opening race at Bahrain, I really started rooting for him, when I saw him go head-to-head with Schumi again.

            Always liked F1 because it’s really superior to other classes, but I’m really having a love-hate relationship these days. Now that I think of it, for the last 10 years really, but lately it’s getting really tiresome.

          • bull mello (@bullmello) said on 7th April 2014, 6:44

            @trotter – Agreed on the ratings. This is a fan site where you really get a wide variation of different ratings for a wide variety of reasons. It really is informal and even a bit humorous sometimes.

            Hope we can enjoy more races like this one!

          • DaveD (@daved) said on 7th April 2014, 21:16

            …with all this mid-season lobbying, Bernie’s raping of the sport, I get a feeling as if we are in a constant struggle just to sit, relax and enjoy it.

            To me, this is the most important statement on the site and what is truly threatening the sport. Yet it gets almost no outrage. Double points? Sure, that sucks. DRS, yep, gimmicky. Too little engine noise? I don’t care, but some people do.

            Bernie raping the sport and the politics of the teams? Horrible and eating the sport like a cancer. But nobody seems to make an issue of that.

  5. matt90 (@matt90) said on 7th April 2014, 1:45

    Excellent Grand Prix, but to make it a 10 it needs something truly sensational – a driver coming back from nowhere, for example.

    Seeing Hamilton hold off Rosberg during the last 10 laps provided that for me to some extent. Not from nowhere, but given the safety car it certainly seemed like a tall order. Most people were sure he would lose it, but he held on through great defensive driving, with the pressure staying on for longer than it did during the last couple of Bahrain races with Vettel and the Lotus.

    Also, seeing the same 2 drivers in the lead passing one another on about 4 or 5 separate occasions is very rare. Although we didn’t see much of it, Hamilton was under constant pressure during the first 15 laps (from then on it was more obvious). It did die down for a 20 lap period, although even then there were other things happening and as we were aware of how important that gap was going to prove (not that it did in the end) it felt rather tense. Then the end was fantastic. To have a race where the lead is pressured that much throughout, with so many attempts and between the same 2 drivers felt gladiatorial, and that marked it as a very special race for me- in a different way to Brazil 2012 or Canada 2011.

    • FlyingLobster27 said on 7th April 2014, 9:05

      As good as it was, a 10 does warrant something sensational and, I’d add, agreeing with COTD, unexpected. It had been a long time since we’d had a battle for the lead, it had been a long time since team-mates had been allowed to fight for a win to the end, which, on top of the action at all levels, makes this race exceptional, but no-one can honestly say that, barring technical issues, they didn’t know which car was going to win. We might get to that level of unpredictability soon… second half of the year?

      • matt90 (@matt90) said on 7th April 2014, 13:12

        but no-one can honestly say that, barring technical issues, they didn’t know which car was going to win.

        There were definitely a few times when I wondered if the Mercs would come together and give victory to whoever was sitting in third at that particular moment.

  6. clay (@clay) said on 7th April 2014, 1:49

    Being fair, it was an exciting race, and all the DRS haters seem to have nothing to complain about today! I think the DRS tweaks for this year seem to have worked. Great racing from Lewis and Nico, congrats to Mercedes for letting them race, but scary that they pulled 1.5 to 2 seconds a lap on the rest of the field after the safety car. Good luck on catching them this season.

    I still rate Suzuka 2005 as the best race ever that I have watched live, but maybe as a Kimi fan the underdog fight from the back will always have a special place for me. This race was pretty good though.

    Also how good would it be for not one but two new engine makers in F1 next year, along with 2 new teams? I did like the comment made by one of the commentators that RBR should try and get the Mercedes contract that McLaren is giving up at the end of the season. I don’t think it will happen but it might actually provide some competition for the silver arrows up front.

    2014 is not a lost cause just yet… Thank you F1!

  7. Deej92 (@deej92) said on 7th April 2014, 1:51

    I have a feeling we might see some sort of Honda B team on the grid, like Super Aguri were. Heck, it could even be them (they’ve entered Formula E).
    Also, if we were to see the Ford name back in F1, that would be the first time since 2004 with Jordan! Hopefully Ford (Cosworth) do come back, making it five engine manufacturers on the grid – a healthy number.

  8. reg (@reg) said on 7th April 2014, 2:26

    Increase turbo noise as soon as possible? Yikes. The noise from the turbo is coming through already load and clear, we don’t need more of that. I don’t like the new engine noise but I’d rather listen to the other mechanicals we are experiencing now than have the teams somehow amplify the turbo or the noise of the current engine itself.

    The current engines don’t seem to be going beyond 12K RPM but the design limit is at 15K. Not sure why the teams cannot find more power in this unused part of the band, I would speculate as a non-engineer that it is related to the fuel flow limit, with the engine getting fuel starved in the higher RPMs so they just short shift before it is an issue.

    Remember this? The Mercedes prediction was pretty bad…

    • hobo (@hobo) said on 7th April 2014, 18:41

      @reg – According to all the discussion surrounding the sound and revs issue, it is fuel flow limit that is keeping it near 12k instead of the 15k limit.

      I think the flow rate rule is redundant and unnecessary given the total fuel amount limit, but if they remove it it will put more strain on the engines. With engine limits as they are, it may be difficult to accomplish both (increased power/flow/noise) that come with 15k RPM and engine reliability.

    • PWP... (@indyf1fan) said on 7th April 2014, 22:01

      If the “F1 Bosses” are committed to increasing engine noise, their priority is certainly not on racing to win. There is a conflict of interest here… I get fan satisfaction but why are they trying to fix a stupid direction from the FIA. They should have a myopic focus on winning… Let the FIA feel the heat from Bernie and the sponsors on stupid green direction…let natural consequences prevail and stop covering up the underlying issues. F1 is plastic when it does not honor the ruthless quest of victory. F1 has a “1″ in it because it is supposed to be fastest and on the edge…not lately. GP2 is getting more of my interest this year so far.

  9. Mackeine Loveine (@cocaine-mackeine) said on 7th April 2014, 2:38

    I´m from Mexico, and I got that feeling when Perez crossed the line in third. Although he didn´t won the race, I waited for more than a year for a podium from this mate. And also because since Brazil 2012, we haven´t seen such a hot-contested race, were every one including the leaders fought every meter of the track. I justify my 10/10, having already watched the two mentioned races.

  10. bull mello (@bullmello) said on 7th April 2014, 3:06

    Good news that the budget cap is scrapped. It would end up being nothing but more negativity and acrimony for the sport. The policing of the cap and the penalties inflicted would challenge the actual racing for F1 headlines. Who wants to see that?

    F1 is a business and all the teams involved are in business to succeed. It is up to them to decide how much to spend and how to spend it. What if Apple or Google were told how much they could spend and on what they could spend it on? How successful would that be? Those companies are more successful because they have the freedom to innovate without cost restrictions and they are responsible for their results.

    In that light, why are some teams more successful while spending less? That is what the less successful teams that spend more need to find out. Look at Lotus vs. McLaren (or Ferrari) in the 2013 season. Or, look at Force India vs. Ferrari so far in the 2014 season. It isn’t always how much you spend, it’s more how you spend it and use resources most effectively. If a team is more successful, they have a better chance for more sponsorship.

    If F1 is doomed without a budget cap (as some might say), why are two new teams willing to jump into F1? Are they stupid? I don’t think so. You don’t get enough money to get into F1 by being stupid. They know how much this sport costs and they still want to get in. Let Mr. Haas (and anyone else) decide how much he wants to spend to build a winning team.

    F1 can be considered to be the pinnacle of motorsport by continuing to advance the technology of racing as they are doing now. F1 needs to quit putting itself down and realize its own worth. A budget cap is draconian, backwards thinking for a high tech progressive sport. F1 should be proud of its history while racing forward into the future.

    • Adam Blocker (@blockwall2) said on 7th April 2014, 3:19

      @bullmello +1

      I agree. My problem is that a cost-cap is the first step towards a spec series.

      Not that there is anything wrong with a spec series, but F1 is not that. In fact, F1 is supposed to be the complete opposite, 11 (or more) teams competing to build the fastest racing machine within the rules from the ground up, not buying some chassis from Dallara that can’t build an F1 car (ex. HRT F110, it was a rubbish base car that HRT then didn’t develop)

    • BasCB (@bascb) said on 7th April 2014, 10:56

      I don’t agree that it is good news at all @bullmello, although it was pretty much expected ever since the ones voting on it were those that will have to give up some goodies by adhering to it.

      I think this is a shortsighted vote by those that gain from doing so and will greatly damage the sport long term, making life harder for those that get less “sign up to break the unity cash” from Bernie.

      • bull mello (@bullmello) said on 7th April 2014, 16:04

        I know some fans disagree and I respect your opinion @bascb . The silliest thing is that those teams voting on it periodically pretend that they would vote for a real budget cap with teeth in it when they know they would never agree to that. Lip service is all it is.

        I just don’t see how a budget cap would really work without inflicting more problems on the sport than it solves. I would like to see a more equitable distribution of moneys to all the teams, but as long as Bernie is around that will likely not improve.

      • hobo (@hobo) said on 7th April 2014, 18:49

        @bascb – I agree. While there are certainly issues and potential problems that would have to be overcome with implementing and policing a spending cap, not having one is dangerous to the long-term viability.

    • Rooney (@rojov123) said on 7th April 2014, 12:39

      F1 should be proud of its history while racing forward into the future

      That is exactly the point. The unending spending spree should be history. And sustainable growth for “ALL TEAMS” should be the future. Or if by future you mean-”Lets just keep doing what we did for the past 50 years until teams run out of money and collapse under their own ego”, then that isint a formula most people would be interested in.

      • bull mello (@bullmello) said on 7th April 2014, 16:24

        @rojov123 – I would like to see a plan for a budget cap that could really work, be agreed upon by all parties and not inflict more negativity on the sport than it resolves.

        For example, how and when would penalties for violations be served?
        Fines? – That would just be a cost of doing business for the wealthier teams.
        Future race grid penalties or bans? – What about at the end of a season, perhaps when a team has won the championship? Will the penalties be served the next season? What if the team is no longer in F1, they just get away with it?
        Demotions or disqualifications? So, then we have the accounting police finding alleged violations after races have been run, maybe even after a season is concluded and then the FIA hands out demotions and DQs?

        How can any of those solutions be a positive thing for F1? Those are only a few scenarios, it could get even worse if implemented. One can imagine the headlines for F1 if any of these situations actually occur.

        I’m not saying what we have now is perfect or even good. The moneys distributed to teams could be done much more equitably and that would put more money right back into the sport. As it stands now, anyone in F1 or getting into F1 in the future knows that it takes a ton of money and they better bring enough. Teams need to be wiser with their resources like Lotus last year and Force India so far this season.

        I would love to proven wrong about a real solution to make budgets more fair and equitable for all teams in F1. So far that solution does not seem to exist.

        • BasCB (@bascb) said on 7th April 2014, 18:47

          I guess it would have to be a combination of taking away championship points and inflicting a cumulative penalty on the budget for the coming year(s), maybe also a penalty to points tally, like the one that teams like Juventus and Milan got when they bought results large scale in Italy @bullmello.
          But I agree with you that in the current setup its not likely to be agreed upon and we should all be reluctant to see Bernie have anything to do with the money side!

          • bull mello (@bullmello) said on 7th April 2014, 22:12

            @bascb – “But I agree with you that in the current setup its not likely to be agreed upon and we should all be reluctant to see Bernie have anything to do with the money side!”

            It becomes more apparent every day that Bernie is the single worst thing about F1. He plays all ends against his middle just to maximize his profits and retain control. I used to think he was a necessary evil and that F1 could be worse off without him. I no longer believe that. It is more obvious than ever he is not the caretaker of F1, rather the pillager of F1′s capital resources and goodwill. The sport would be better of without him.

  11. Fer no.65 (@fer-no65) said on 7th April 2014, 3:31

    “One wonders why Ferrari and Red Bull are suddenly so concerned over the opinions of the fans, when every poll conducted in the independent domain over double points repeatedly sees well over a 95% dislike of the rule, and yet they have not seen fit to push for its eradication.”

    THAT! just that…

    • mantresx (@mantresx) said on 7th April 2014, 4:51

      Someone should’ve asked that question to Luca, although I can already imagine what he would answer… it doesn’t affect racing bla bla bla.

      The truth is, no one wants to disagree with Bernie, you could even say they’re scared of him and that’s unsettling, everyone’s willing to fight against Todt and the FIA (just look at Red Bull) but not Ecclestone.

  12. HoHum (@hohum) said on 7th April 2014, 4:38

    “We are listening to the fans” well actually to the 30% that agree with Bernie. What about the 67% that like the new sound/volume, I thought it was perfectly fine to begin with but each race it seems to improve. I will be very unhappy if it gets artificially increased, and let’s face it only boy-racers put megaphones or cans on their exhausts to make the sound louder without any other benefit. Go on then, jerk the other knee, jerks.

  13. xbx-117 (@xbx-117) said on 7th April 2014, 5:34

    In response to COTD, “And all I can say to that is bull****.”

    • OOliver said on 7th April 2014, 7:40

      What was so fantastic about Canada 2011, One driver came from behind in the wet conditions to win, yes that was spectacular, but then what was the competition like for all the other runners?
      Nature didn’t interfere with the race, yet we had all the cars bunched up together, well at least in different groups, and the battles were sustained all through the race.
      A race doesn’t have to be a championship finale before it ranks as exciting, after all, the entire season is for the championship. Drivers are battling for wins which is the reason they go racing.

  14. TMF (@tmf42) said on 7th April 2014, 5:37

    Mercedes outsmarted the rest and they deserve every win they score and I really like the new formula. And if the racing is good then I’m not concerned with a one sided championship even if I don’t support Mercedes or either of their driver.

    To LDM who suddenly is super concerned about the future of F1, I only have to say, “give up the privileges and divide the money more equally then less cost saving is necessary and development freezes wouldn’t be necessary to that extend that it makes it impossible for Ferrari and Co. to catch up quickly.”

    All the problems F1 still has are just self inflicted and if people in charge remain selfish and silly then there is no cure for them.

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