Red Bull no closer than in Australia – Vettel

F1 Fanatic Round-up

Sebastian Vettel, Red Bull, Silverstone test, 2014In the round-up: Sebastian Vettel admits Red Bull are no closer to Mercedes’ performance than they were at the beginning of the season.

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Your daily digest of F1 news, views, features and more.

Seb: We haven’t closed the gap (Sky)

“Right now the gap is very big and we haven’t really closed the gap since race one.”

McLaren abandons ‘going radical’ (ESPN)

Eric Boullier: “There won’t be any radical change now. We’re going to push as hard and as long as possible the development of this car as long as we can carry the concepts over to next year’s car.”

FIA rejects Raikkonen penalty claims (Autosport)

“Although the FIA accepted that Raikkonen would not have crashed if he had slowed down dramatically, it is understood the governing body believed that any other driver would have rejoined the track in the same manner.”

Stat Centre: The British Grand Prix (Red Bull)

“Sebastian’s early stop got him out of traffic with the McLarens – but it meant a one-stop wasn’t possible for him.”

The First Time – with Marussia’s Max Chilton (F1)

“The first thing I did after getting signed by an F1 team was winning the GP2 race in Singapore! I won the feature race straight after being announced as Marussia reserve.”

Saison 2014 (Canal +)

Over half an hour of onboard footage from the British Grand Prix.

Tweets

Comment of the day

Arki is pleased Fernando Alonso and Sebastian Vettel were left to sort it out between themselves at Silverstone:

I am extremely glad that there was no intervention by Charlie Whiting or the stewards in the magnificent Vettel/Alonso tussle during the British Grand Prix.

I was very fearful that a penalty for being too defensive or the breaking of another the myriad of rules governing (limiting) driver engagements would be handed out and that would have been a travesty. That battle was entirely the sort of thing I watch F1 for and since I have rejoined the scene in the past couple of seasons the over nannying of such encounters has been disappointing to say the least.

Don’t get me wrong, I absolutely see the need for stewards (and some of the driver stewards are epic guys) but in my opinion there is too much intervention and criticism of overtakes and/or when two cars come together.
Arki (@Arki19)

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On this day in F1

Michael Schumacher notched up his tenth win from the first eleven races of the 2004 season in the British Grand Prix. He lined up fourth in the grid, but this was in the days of ‘race fuel qualifying’, and once his rivals had pitted he was in the lead within a dozen laps and on his way to victory.

Here’s the start of the race with Kimi Raikkonen taking the early advantage from pole position:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mI3pMFA7clw

Image © Red Bull/Getty

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120 comments on Red Bull no closer than in Australia – Vettel

  1. Keith Campbell (@keithedin) said on 11th July 2014, 11:11

    Not related to today’s roundup items but back to the 18” wheels – Charles Pic and Pirelli give some further details in the sky article here:

    http://www1.skysports.com/f1/news/24247/9377572/charles-pic-warns-new-18-inch-pirellis-would-be-a-big-challenge-for-the-f1-teams

    Have to say, it doesn’t exactly sound promising from a performance point of view, although hopefully Pic’s comments are mostly due to it being a prototype tyre and the car not being set up correctly for them. But at least Pirelli answered my question on overall weight of wheel + tyre:

    “The total weight, including the rim, is around 4 kilograms heavier.”

    • beneboy (@beneboy) said on 11th July 2014, 12:05

      It’s way too early to be thinking about the performance of those tyres, the ones used this week are an early development model that are for data gathering only so they’ll be extremely conservative in design and compound to ensure they don’t have any blowouts in early testing. If Pirelli are hoping for these to be used in 2016 then it gives them over a year of development before we see anything like a finished design.

      • J. Danek (@jdanek007) said on 11th July 2014, 20:25

        @beneboy @keithedin – Paul Hembery has said already that the running of the 18″ set-up was done only so that Pirelli could make photos and video of the actual tire/rim combo to present to decision-makers later – so they wouldn’t have to use artist’s renderings…

        No performance analysis should be based on this single photographical outing.

    • Keith Collantine (@keithcollantine) said on 11th July 2014, 20:55

      @keithedin By the way the point about the weight was covered here earlier.

  2. petebaldwin (@petebaldwin) said on 11th July 2014, 11:11

    Regarding COTD (@Arki19) – that’s the problem with F1 at the moment. If someone goes for a daring dive down the inside and the other driver yields, it’s called “a great overtaking manouver.” If the other driver doesn’t yield and they come together, it’s called a “stupid move.”

    There seems to be no room in F1 for the fact that sometimes a driver will go for something and unfortunatey, it just doesn’t work out. Happens in racing all the time but with F1, someone always has to be to blame.

    • Jason (@jason12) said on 11th July 2014, 12:33

      +1000
      If the overtaking driver takes the racing line at a corner, forcing the other driver to use the less optimal part of the track, if the driver being overtaken decides he’s not having that and bangs his car against the overtaking driver, strangely the overtaking driver gets penalised.

      No wonder there’s been such a reduction in daring manoeuvres.

    • Sven (@crammond) said on 11th July 2014, 14:28

      While I think I agree with your point, I also think that those “daring dives down the inside” always are a bit stupid, and not at all “great overtaking manouvers”. Those who try deserve to get the door shut and be involved in an incident every now and then.
      A really great overtaking manouver is set up at least one, if not several corners before, and avoids any chance of the defending driver to shut the door in time.

    • Keith Collantine (@keithcollantine) said on 11th July 2014, 20:57

      @petebaldwin

      There seems to be no room in F1 for the fact that sometimes a driver will go for something and unfortunatey, it just doesn’t work out. Happens in racing all the time but with F1, someone always has to be to blame.

      I’m partly playing devil’s advocate here, but isn’t this what we expect from what is supposed to be the pinnacle of motor racing? If these are the best drivers in the world they shouldn’t be taking speculative dives up the inside and there should be consequences when they take a rival out.

  3. Yobo01 (@yobo01) said on 11th July 2014, 11:17

    I agree with Vettel. Actually, I was surprised to hear so many people from RB in the first few races saying “we are definitely improving and closing the gap little by little”. I didn’t see that. In the first race Red Bull finished second, in the second GP Vettel came very close to outqualifying Hamilton and he challenged Rosberg in the middle of the race. The situation has not improved since then.
    Sure, the RB10 right now looks much better to drive than a few races ago, but Mercedes has improved just as much.

    • Keith Collantine (@keithcollantine) said on 11th July 2014, 20:57

      @yobo01

      in the second GP Vettel came very close to outqualifying Hamilton

      In fairness that was because qualifying was wet – Red Bull have been closer in wet qualifying all season long, as was also the case in Silverstone.

  4. Jason (@jason12) said on 11th July 2014, 12:36

    we haven’t really closed the gap since race one.

    Maybe, but RIC has a race victory and is constantly scoring podiums.

    Maybe it’s because of his positive attitude in that he chooses to see the glass as half-full and not as half-empty.

  5. Adam Hardwick (@fluxsource) said on 11th July 2014, 13:46

    Not sure I agree with COTD. The corners both before and after Vettel’s move on Alonso, Vettel went outside the track limits. He wouldn’t have been able to overtake without doing so – or I’m sure he would have done. How can that be fair? I’m all for encouraging close racing, and avoiding over harsh penalties, but if you overtime while not keeping within the track limits, surely you MUST give the place back?

    I’m wouldn’t have supported Vettel getting a drive through or other time penalty. But for all those saying “this is what we want, close racing”, how much more close racing would you have had if Vettel had been required to overtake legally? 1 more lap? 2? till the end of the race?

    To, me Vettel is now simply a cheat (possibly Alonso too, although his weren’t as noticeable when I watched). Which to me makes those exciting laps pointless.

    And as for encouraging drivers to go on the attack, what about encouraging drivers to defend? We’ve seen many occasions over the past couple of seasons where a driver has simply not defended to avoid spoiling their own race. It’s going to be even worse now – why bother defending when they guy behind can just leave the track to overtake?

    • Yobo01 (@yobo01) said on 11th July 2014, 20:37

      Well, the thing is that we are talking about very small off tracks. I mean, it’s not like one of them jumped a chicane or carried an insane amout of speed through a corner and used the runoffs. This year they’ve been quite strict with track limits, last year going a bit wide at Copse wasn’t a problem at all.
      I mean, Copse is a blind, fast corner. It’s a difficult corner by itself, if you are side by side and you go slightly wide it’s no big deal in my opinion.

    • Keith Collantine (@keithcollantine) said on 11th July 2014, 21:04

      @fluxsource

      The corners both before and after Vettel’s move on Alonso, Vettel went outside the track limits. He wouldn’t have been able to overtake without doing so – or I’m sure he would have done. How can that be fair?

      Vettel did not exceed track limits at Luffield before he passed Alonso at Copse (unless you count Woodcote as the preceding corner, which is just an acceleration zone).

      More pertinently, you can just as easily make the case that on earlier occasions where Vettel might have been able to pass Alonso he was unable to do so because Alonso exceeded track limits. If race control weren’t going to enforce the rules on Alonso why should Vettel obey them?

      To, me Vettel is now simply a cheat

      Well he’s not, you’re just holding him to a higher standard than Alonso. After all Alonso was the only one of the pair to actually be warned for not obeying track limits. Had the stewards given Alonso a warning but then punished Vettel for the same without giving him a warning it would have been hypocrisy.

      • Adam Hardwick (@fluxsource) said on 11th July 2014, 21:25

        @keithcollantine

        Vettel did not exceed track limits at Luffield before he passed Alonso at Copse (unless you count Woodcote as the preceding corner, which is just an acceleration zone).

        My mistake – I didn’t notice the preceding corner in the race at the time, and was basing my comment on a report I read. The point still stands for the following corner though.

        More pertinently, you can just as easily make the case that on earlier occasions where Vettel might have been able to pass Alonso he was unable to do so because Alonso exceeded track limits.

        You’re absolutely right – exactly the same arguments apply to Alonso. I just felt my post had been long enough without repeating the same again.

        Well he’s not, you’re just holding him to a higher standard than Alonso.

        See above. If it was up to me on Sunday, I would have given Vettel the same warning Alonso received at the first instance of the offence. When the fighting heated up, I would have asked their respective teams to remind them of the rule, and the enforcement, and – if it was continued by both – given both a penalty of some kind. I realise it’s a difficult call sometimes, but if they’re both breaking the rules, then give them the same punishment. That way the stewards don’t decide the outcome of that particular fight, but it still enforces the fact that racing must take place actually ON the track.

        We’d already had times deleted during qualifying for exceeding track limits, why is the race different?

    • how much more close racing would you have had if Vettel had been required to overtake legally?

      How much would we have had if Alonso had been required to defend legally? Quite a bit less, I suspect.

  6. Imre (@f1mre) said on 11th July 2014, 15:36

    “it is understood the governing body believed that any other driver would have rejoined the track in the same manner.”

    So, if everybody ignores red lights, ignoring red lights is legal and the right thing to do.

    • David not Coulthard (@davidnotcoulthard) said on 11th July 2014, 16:46

      @f1mre No, it’s if everybody fails a math test concerning congruency, it probably isn’t the students’ fault.

    • Paul A (@paul-a) said on 11th July 2014, 19:27

      No. What they’re saying is that all drivers would have done the same thing AND “his car was unsettled by a bump as it ran through a patch of grass.” This makes it either a “racing incident” or “an unavoidable accident” or … whatever … but they couldn’t blame Raikkonen. It quietly suggests or implies that the owners of Silverstone should maybe look at the (in hindsight) invisible “bump” (or at least mow the lawn so that it becomes visible!) Nothing wrong, just unfortunate, bad luck.

      • Keith Collantine (@keithcollantine) said on 11th July 2014, 21:09

        @paul-a In which case I hope the owners of Silverstone point out there is a perfectly serviceable strip of tarmac connecting the run-off to the circuit, which Raikkonen for some reason chose not to use.

        I think it takes excuse-making for Raikkonen to extremes to call the bump he hit “invisible”. It may have been hard to see from inside an F1 car cockpit at speed but that’s what track walks are for.

        • Paul A (@paul-a) said on 11th July 2014, 22:57

          Not disagreeing with you in any substantial manner, I was only trying to “refine” what the stewards decided — and they are quoted as saying “the governing body believed that any other driver would have rejoined the track in the same manner” and this despite some drivers having possibly done a “track walk.” Although how many did, and exactly what they looked at, I have no clue.
          [As an aside, I find it quite easy to hit bumps in my lawn, walking behind my mower at 3 m.p.h. -- and as you so rightly say that's very different from lying in an F1 car at over a hundred...]

        • I imagine a track walk of the old hockenhiem was a packed lunch affair then . :)

  7. sato113 (@sato113) said on 11th July 2014, 18:09

    I love these canal oboard vids!

    • Awesome eh!
      i love the onboard stuff
      Alonso got taken quite by surprise(asleep) with Bottas pulling up,
      How come we can still watch this stuff?
      and Burnees men in black aren’t tearing it down like you tube footage ?

  8. Nick (@npf1) said on 11th July 2014, 22:06

    I have to say, looking at that 2004 Silverstone video, I honestly think my Schumacher favoritism was keeping me attached to F1 at that point. I literally remember nothing but Button’s helmet, Minardi driving without sponsors to remember John Walton (and subsequently losing Wilux as sponsor, which subsequently collapsed) and Trulli’s crash about that weekend.

    It’s weird, but looking back, I really did prefer 1998, 2000, 2003 and 2006 to seasons like 2004 and especially 2002. At least 2004 had a shake up behind Ferrari, I guess..

  9. SauberS1 (@saubers1) said on 11th July 2014, 22:08

    I wonder why doesn’t McLaren want to put the resources to next car.

  10. J. Danek (@jdanek007) said on 11th July 2014, 23:16

    The ONBOARD video is great, but WHY at 24:46 is the video blurring/obscuring some logo(s) on Williams’s car?

    This seems rude.

  11. Red Bull no closer ????

    Well they most certainly are closer than in Australia.
    after that round they were equal on points to ZERO,
    now they are running 2nd in WCC
    62 points ahead of the Red Tractors.

    But I get it,
    no closer in performance,
    But is anyone?

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