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Pictures: Porsche officially reveal 919 Hybrid LMP1 racer

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  • #250732
    Profile photo of Keith Collantine
    Keith Collantine
    Keymaster

    Here are Porsche’s official launch pictures of the 919 Hybrid LMP1 which will contest this year’s World Endurance championship and Le Mans 24 Hours.

    Porsche 919 Hybrid, 2014

    Porsche 919 Hybrid, 2014

    Porsche 919 Hybrid, 2014

    Porsche 919 Hybrid, 2014

    Porsche 919 Hybrid, 2014

    Porsche 919 Hybrid, 2014

    Porsche 919 Hybrid, 2014

    Porsche 919 Hybrid, 2014

    Porsche 919 Hybrid, 2014

    #250733
    Profile photo of Keith Collantine
    Keith Collantine
    Keymaster

    Porsche 919 Hybrid technology detail, 2014

    Porsche 919 Hybrid technology detail, 2014

    Porsche 919 Hybrid technology detail, 2014

    Porsche 919 Hybrid technology detail, 2014

    Porsche 919 Hybrid technology detail, 2014

    #250734
    Profile photo of Keith Collantine
    Keith Collantine
    Keymaster

    Here it is with the 911 RSR in a complementary livery:

    Porsche 911 RSR and 919 Hybrid, 2014

    Porsche 911 RSR and 919 Hybrid, 2014

    Porsche 911 RSR and 919 Hybrid, 2014

    Porsche 911 RSR and 919 Hybrid, 2014

    Porsche 911 RSR and 919 Hybrid, 2014

    #250735
    Profile photo of Keith Collantine
    Keith Collantine
    Keymaster

    And here’s the obligatory press bumpf:

    World premiere: 919 Hybrid for Le Mans

    Porsche returns to the great motor sport stage. The sports car marque is sending a cutting edge technology platform, the new 919 Hybrid, to race in the top LMP1 category of the World Endurance Championship (WEC), which includes the renowned 24 Hours of Le Mans. On the race track and at the Geneva International Motor Show, the LMP1 prototype will be accompanied by the new Porsche 911 RSR, another world premiere in Geneva.

    Technology transfer from race course to streets

    Motor sport is as much a part of Porsche as the numeric sequence 911. The first sports car from Zuffenhausen was sent to race at Le Mans back in 1951, ie shortly after the company was founded.

    Ever since, knowledge acquired in competition has benefited the company’s production models. Developments such as dual ignition, disc brakes, the dual-clutch transmission and powerful hybrid drives were first proven out on the race course before they were introduced into street models. As a result, there is always a race car within every Porsche.

    In 2014, Porsche is returning to the top class of endurance racing after an absence of 16 years. Consequently, the engineers had to develop the new Porsche 919 Hybrid from scratch. The new WEC regulations for LMP1 race cars gave them an unusual degree of freedom, while focusing on such technologies with great future potential such as hybridisation, engine downsizing and a systematic approach to lightweight design. Instead of pure power, the focus is now on clever ways to enhance fuel efficiency: only those with fuel-efficient cars are competitive. For a long time now, Porsche has called this ‘Porsche Intelligent Performance.’

    The 919 Hybrid is the most complex race car that Porsche has ever put on wheels. It benefits from the know-how that Porsche acquired in producing the 918 Spyder plug-in hybrid super sports car, as well as the hybrid versions of the Panamera Gran Turismo and all-wheel drive Cayenne. At the same time, the LMP1 racer – as a unique test laboratory that is subjected to the unrivalled innovative and competitive pressures of motor sport – has maximum relevance when it comes to the future of sports cars.

    Porsche also continues its commitment to GT racing

    In tandem with the LMP1 project, Porsche is also taking on the intense competition in the GTE classes at Le Mans and in the WEC. It is once again sending its own GT factory team to the races with two 911 RSR race cars that boast 470 hp of power output. The successor to the successful 911 GT3 RSR – with which Porsche customer teams have earned numerous victories and titles in international endurance championships since 2004 – crowned its racing debut last year at the Le Mans 24 Hours by placing first and second. The rear-wheel drive 911 RSR is based on the 911 Carrera ‘Type 991’ – the seventh generation of the sports car icon. It is distinguished by its intelligent lightweight design and refined aerodynamics. In preparation for the new racing season, Porsche engineers further improved it in many aspects.

    Porsche 919 Hybrid

    Pioneer technology for World Endurance Championship

    Porsche is returning to the top category of the famous endurance race classic at Le Mans and the World Endurance Championships (WEC) for sports cars with its newly-developed 919 Hybrid. The LMP1 prototype, which is designed for extreme efficiency, is the most complex race car that Porsche has ever built.

    It serves as a research platform for fundamental technology to be used in future production models, with its combination of two different energy recovery systems and a downsized, turbocharged engine. So the real winner of Porsche factory racing is already clear: it is the customer.

    The World Endurance Championship (WEC) for sports cars launches into a new era, beginning on 20 April at Silverstone in Great Britain. The season highlight, the 24 Hours of Le Mans, follows in June. The newly formulated regulations of the top class of the World Championship has completely changed in focus. From now on, the sporting performance of the LMP1-H prototypes will be rated in direct relationship to their energy efficiency. While the allowable fuel quantity per lap was reduced by around 30 per cent compared to the prior year, the amount of energy of the obligatory hybrid systems that can be used in the race was dramatically increased. This shifts technology into the forefront that is most significant for future production vehicles. From the perspective of Porsche, that is a decisive argument for a return to the top league of sports car racing.

    Maximum efficiency of all elements as development goal

    Porsche engineers are taking on the challenges of the WEC regulations with innovative solutions and all the creativity they can muster. The development of the Porsche 919 Hybrid began in mid-2011 – literally on a blank sheet of paper. As newcomers, the team had to do without the greater experience that their competitors in the LMP1 category enjoyed.

    However, they were able to access the know-how that Porsche had acquired in its racing success with the 911 GT3 R Hybrid and the 918 Spyder super sports car, which is also hybrid-driven.

    The exceptional efficiency of the highly complex technology of the Porsche 919 Hybrid is the result of a carefully balanced overall concept. From the combustion engine to the energy recovery systems, chassis and running gear, aerodynamics and driver ergonomics, the sum of all individual components forms an exceptionally effective unit. It all serves one goal: maximum sporting performance within tight fuel economy constraints.

    In choosing a hybridised drive concept, the newly formulated WEC regulations gave the Porsche engineers great freedom. The drive system of the new LMP1 race car is based on a four cylinder petrol engine that is as compact as it is lightweight. It performs load-bearing functions within the chassis based on its V-angle construction, which also offers thermodynamic advantages. The petrol engine, which reaches a maximum engine speed of around 9,000 rpm, is a front-runner in terms of its downsizing philosophy with 2.0 litres displacement, direct injection and single turbo charging.

    It also features two different energy recovery systems. Fundamentally new and especially innovative is the recovery of thermal energy from exhaust gases. An electric generator is used here, which is powered by the exhaust gas stream. The functionality of the second hybrid system is known from the Porsche 918 Spyder. Here, a generator on the front axle utilises braking phases to convert kinetic energy into electric energy. It is also stored in highly-advanced water-cooled lithium-ion battery packs until the driver needs the extra energy. Then the front generator is operated as a single electric motor and drives the two front wheels via a differential in the acceleration phases. This gives the Porsche 919 Hybrid a temporary all-wheel drive system, because the petrol engine directs its power to the rear wheels in a conventional way.

    Powerful hybrid drive for the 8 megajoule Premiere Class

    Intelligent management of this additional available energy assumes a special role here. Of course, the strategic focus of the racing engineers is always on the most efficient use of available power. This means an optimal lap time. The driver can choose from several automated drive modes that have an effect on vehicle dynamics as a function of the traffic situation, course layout and weather conditions. At this point, the developers made use of knowledge gained by Porsche with the 911 GT3 R Hybrid, including at the 24 Hour race on the Nürburgring.

    The allowable petrol fuel consumption depends directly on the amount of electrical energy that the driver can call up per lap in what is known as the ‘Boost’ function. Race rules distinguish between four levels ranging from 2 to 8 megajoules (MJ). Porsche is developing the 919 Hybrid for the ‘Premiere Class’ with an energy recovery capacity of 8 MJ. This requires the use of high-performance energy recovery and storage systems, which necessarily need to be larger and heavier. A flow meter device also limits the amount of fuel flow. For example at Le Mans, the turbocharged petrol engine, which is driven at full load for 75 per cent of the 13.65 kilometre lap, only has 4.64 litres of fuel available. In the 2-MJ class, the figure is 5.04 litres.

    Factors for success: Low weight and efficient aerodynamics

    In motor sport and in the production models, Porsche has always devoted a lot of attention to the theme of lightweight design. This continues to be the case with the Porsche 919 Hybrid. Despite the addition of many new technical systems, race regulations have reduced the specified minimum vehicle weight by 30 kg to 870 kg compared to the prior year. This is definitely an ambitious requirement. The specialists at Porsche are approaching this target value by intensive optimisation of even the smallest of details. As is the case for road-going Porsche sports cars, the following applies to the 919 Hybrid as well – and very undogmatically: the right material is always used in the right place for the intended purpose.

    As in Formula 1 racing, the chassis of the new Porsche 919 Hybrid consists of a carbon fibre monocoque with a sandwich construction. It combines low weight with a very high degree of torsional rigidity and safety. As a result, it offers a foundation for precise wheel location via multi-link suspension – an important pre-requisite to exploit optimally under all conditions the full potential of race tyres from development partner Michelin that are just 14 inches wide (previously 16 inches).

    According to the race regulations, the Porsche 919 Hybrid must not exceed a length of 4,650 mm and a height of 1,050 mm, and vehicle width must be between 1,800 and 1,900 mm. The car’s aerodynamics have been fine-tuned in over 2,000 hours of wind tunnel testing since February 2012. Aerodynamics make an important contribution to the overall efficiency of the race car and reduce air drag while supplying the increased cooling air needed for the hybrid drive and the downforce needed for high cornering speeds. The aerodynamic design of the Porsche 919 Hybrid can be modified for different course characteristics.

    Safe and functional: Optimal working conditions for the driver

    Driver ergonomics play a crucial role, especially in endurance races like the 24 Hours of Le Mans. The engineers therefore devoted a lot of attention to the layout of the cockpit. The drivers have a good view of race events thanks to their somewhat higher seat position in the chassis compared to the previous LMP1 rules. In night-time hours, LED four-point headlights that were specially designed for the Porsche provide clear visual conditions.

    Their distinctive form was created in co-operation with Style Porsche, the design studio for production models. Here too, this modern lighting technology will benefit all Porsche customers in the future.

    Countdown: Around 200 employees and 6 drivers look forward to the season start

    In mid-May 2011, Porsche decided to return to the World Endurance Championship and the 24 Hours of Le Mans with an LMP1 factory team. Consequently, the Porsche Motorsport centre in Weissach was expanded considerably, and a service garage and administration building were added. Today, around 200 employees participate in the engineering, construction and use of the Porsche 919 Hybrid. Fritz Enzinger (age 57) assumes overall management of the LMP1 project. Responsible for technology is engineer Alexander Hitzinger (Dipl.-Ing., age 42). Andreas Seidl (age 38) is team leader.

    The cockpits of the two Porsche 919 Hybrid cars are shared by experienced Le Mans Porsche

    drivers Timo Bernhard (Germany, age 33), Romain Dumas (France, age 36) and Marc Lieb (Germany, 33) as well as Brendon Hartley (New Zealand, age 24), Neel Jani (Switzerland, age 30) and former Formula 1 driver Mark Webber (Australia, age 37).

    The 2014 WEC season includes seven 6-hour races and the world famous 24 Hours of Le Mans (14 – 15 June) as a season highlight. On Easter Sunday, 20 April, the racing begins at Silverstone, Northamptonshire, UK. After Spa-Francorchamps in Belgium (3 May), there are other world championship races on the programme in Austin (Texas, 20 September), Japan (Fuji, 12 October), China (Shanghai, 1 November), Bahrain (Sakhir, 15 November) and Brazil (São Paulo, 30 November).

    Porsche LMP1: a look at the team for the 919 Hybrid

    The LMP1 team in Weissach includes over 200 people. It’s the mixture that does the trick: endurance racing experience, company expertise and fresh Formula 1 know-how. This also applies to the team leaders and the six factory drivers.

    Fritz Enzinger, Vice President LMP1 (Austria, age 57)

    This native of Styria was employed in the services of BMW for thirty years. He was in positions of responsibility in victories at Le Mans in 1999 and in Formula 1 successes. At the end of 2011, he switched to Porsche and began to build up the LMP1 project in Weissach. Building, personnel, vehicle – organising everything from scratch was an irresistible challenge. Two goals spur him on: first, to create sustainable top sports organisational structures for the company. Second, to score a 17th overall victory for Porsche at Le Mans as quickly as possible. Raising Iceland ponies is his hobby for unwinding, a passion that he shares with his wife and daughter.

    Alexander Hitzinger, Technical Director of LMP1 (Germany, age 42)

    At the end of 2011, he turned his back on the Formula 1 World Championship to join Porsche. He was fascinated by the opportunity to be involved in the continuation of the great motor sport history of the marque. As technical director of the LMP1 team, the Bavarian was responsible for the development of the 919 Hybrid – a vehicle of high complexity with a lot of potential for genuine innovations. The engineer has a long résumé of experience in various high-class motor sport categories. His positions included ‘Head of F1 Development’ for the English race car engine builder Cosworth and most recently ‘Head of Advanced Technologies’ at Red Bull Racing. He is married and has two children.

    Andreas Seidl, Team Principal (Germany, age 38)

    What is fascinating about motor sport to Seidl, an engineer, is the immediate feedback that it offers. Every modification undergoes a stress test in competition, and the test bench is public. This Bavarian can handle the pressure. It is the results that count. He is enthusiastic about the team spirit and the perfect staging of a race weekend – in both its technical and organisational aspects. At BMW, Seidl was responsible for testing and race events in Formula 1 racing. When the company returned to DTM racing, he was racing director and immediately attained the Championship title. Mission completed. At Porsche, the father of two found a new challenge.

    Drivers of the Porsche 919 Hybrid

    Timo Bernhard (Germany, age 33)

    He knows how it is to win the most famous sports car race in the world. In 2010, he was part of the victorious Audi team at Le Mans together with Romain Dumas and Mike Rockenfeller. He wants to do that again. “To do this with Porsche would be awesome. It’s impossible to describe my enthusiasm for the brand.” Bernhard, who began his Porsche career in 1999 as a Junior Driver, has attained seven overall victories in 24 hour races – five times on the Nürburgring and once each at Le Mans and Daytona. Endurance racing is not his only passion: in 2013, he won a stage of the German Rally Championship in his homeland of Saarland, driving a 911 GT3.

    Romain Dumas (France, age 36)

    He lives and breathes Porsche. When the Swiss domiciled driver is not racing with the Porsche factory team, he is off on a private mission. Such as at Pikes Peak, in Macau or in the French Rally Championship, where he won four stages in 2013, driving a 911 GT3 RS. His resume includes seven overall victories in 24 hour races – the Le Mans win in an Audi along with Timo Bernhard and Mike Rockenfeller in 2010, four times at the North Loop of the Nürburgring and twice at Spa in Porsche race cars. The Mediterranean is not far from his birthplace of Alès, and boats are another of his long cherished passions. Dumas’ most recent passion, however, is named Gabin, who was born in late 2013.

    Brendon Hartley (New Zealand, age 24)

    From the generation of computer kids, a highly sought-after simulator driver with Formula 1 experience and a genuine racer. As a teenager, he left his home ‘Down Under’ to pursue a professional career in Europe, which really took an upward swing in 2007 with the Championship title in the World Series by Renault. As a Formula 1 test driver, he missed the thrill of competition, so Hartley turned to sports car racing. To him, the most emotional race in the world is the 24 Hours of Le Mans. “A rollercoaster of feelings; never have I seen so many grown-up men with tears in their eyes.”

    Neel Jani (Switzerland, age 30)

    A Swiss citizen with Indian roots, an experienced endurance driver, who was hooked on Porsche even as a child. Sunday excursions in the back seat of his father’s 911 shaped his future. Formula Renault, Champ Car World Series, victory in the A1GP series, several years as a Formula 1 test driver – for a long time, single seater racing took centre stage. Jani, who lives in the Swiss city of Port with his wife Lauren, drove in his first Le Mans race in 2009. In 2011, he won the Le Mans Series with Rebellion; in 2012, he just missed the podium at Le Mans, finishing in overall fourth place, once again in the LMP1 Rebellion. “At Le Mans, it is only possible to compete for the overall victory with a top factory team.”

    Marc Lieb (Germany, age 33)

    As a 20 year-old, the native of Stuttgart won the Porsche Junior Driver Selection. Ever since, he has celebrated Porsche victories across the globe, including five overall victories at 24 hour races: four times at the Nürburgring and once in Spa. At Le Mans, he won in the GT class with Porsche – now he wants to compete in the top category there as well. The young father of two has not only applied his talents to the development of race cars; the services of the vehicle technology engineer were also highly appreciated in the development of the 918 Spyder. In autumn 2013, he set the course record on the North Loop of the Nürburgring with the super sports car.

    Mark Webber (Australia, age 37)

    This Formula 1 star – with 215 Grand Prix races, 13 pole positions and nine victories – has taken up the challenge of sports car racing. Born in Queanbeyan (New South Wales), he moved to England in 1996. Formula Ford, Formula 3, sports cars, Formula 3000, Formula 1. The outdoor sports enthusiast still has a score to settle at Le Mans. In 1999, he rolled over twice in his AMG Mercedes CLR due to an aerodynamic problem. What Porsche means to him: “Super highly-developed sports cars that can make do without over-statement – perfect in every mood and in every scenario.” He lives with Ann Neal (and their many dogs) in Aylesbury (UK).

    #250736
    Profile photo of Tomsk
    Tomsk
    Participant

    Bit of an Earthdreams moment for me. Whose stupid idea was that? It doesn’t even all fit on the car – maybe the second car says:
    HE
    IGENT
    RMANCE
    And for those of us watching from the usual height, it’ll look like an Audi.

    #250737
    Profile photo of Keith Collantine
    Keith Collantine
    Keymaster

    DMG MORI? More like OMG LOL.

    A couple of thoughts on the press release:

    1. Did I miss something or have Porsche still not officially confirmed the engine is a V4?
    2. Note that Porsche can’t resist getting a dig in at Mercedes in the Webber biography

    #250743
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    Love the car better with the zebra look. For once Porsche manages to disappoint me a little. Well, it’l be fast for sure.

    #250744
    Profile photo of BasCB
    BasCB
    Participant

    Hm, not the most interesting looking LMP1 car I have seen in the last 2-3 years, and the livery? Up to par with the Sauber of 2 years back, no win there either. LEts now hope they do go fast and get that one settled!

    No Keith, can’t find any official part where the V4 is confirmed either.

    #250753
    Profile photo of Keith Collantine
    Keith Collantine
    Keymaster

    Some more pictures of the car ‘in the flesh’:

    Porsche 919 Hybrid, Geneva Motor Show, 2014

    Porsche 919 Hybrid, Geneva Motor Show, 2014

    Porsche 919 Hybrid, Geneva Motor Show, 2014

    Porsche 919 Hybrid, Geneva Motor Show, 2014

    Porsche 919 Hybrid, Geneva Motor Show, 2014

    Porsche team, Geneva Motor Show, 2014

    #250754
    Profile photo of ajokay
    ajokay
    Participant

    Beautiful. If you like grey and white. Apparently viewed above down all those straight lines spell out the middle section of that “Porsche Intelligent Performance” sponsor on the side.

    Lazy.

    The shape of the car is very nice, though.

    #250757
    Profile photo of Keith Collantine
    Keith Collantine
    Keymaster

    @BasCB Oh wait – yes they have:

    Our choice of combustion engine was born out of an efficiency-optimised approach: a highly compact, turbocharged four-cylinder 2-litre engine with direct fuel injection.

    http://www.porsche.com/uk/motorsportandevents/motorsport/worksracing/racingcars/919-hybrid/technology/

    #250758
    Profile photo of BasCB
    BasCB
    Participant

    Ah, although it still doesn’t say V4 om there, just a 4 cylinder!

    #250761
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    Could be a straight four?

    #250763
    Profile photo of BasCB
    BasCB
    Participant

    from images they showed earlier (see Racecar Engineering) its pretty clear that its a V4 @ardenflo (see r)

    #250764
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    Ah yeah, stupid me. Am just curious about what it is as they haven’t mentioned it yet.

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