Group Admins

  • Profile picture of Keith Collantine

Group Mods

  • Profile picture of damonsmedley
  • Profile picture of Bradley Downton

F1

Public Group active 16 hours, 17 minutes ago

F1 discussion

How did Button end up ahead of Perez in Spain?

This topic contains 31 replies, has 15 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of matt90 matt90 1 year, 7 months ago.

Viewing 2 posts - 31 through 32 (of 32 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #236574
    Profile photo of Nick
    Nick
    Participant

    @matt90

    The secretism deosn’t matter- there’s simply a clear-cut difference between letting your team mate through so that he can go and finish a further few places ahead, and swapping the drivers in the lead for no benefit in that particular race when both drivers are mathematically still in the hunt for the championship.

    I never mentioned secretism. And in both cases, Hamilton and Alonso were much more likely to win the title. To say 2008 wasn’t in favor for the title, but 2010 was, seems strange to me. Math or not, Heikki nor Felipe were going to gain that many points at that point in the season.

    To call that fanboyism is showing a delusional misunderstandnig of the large number of differences between the two cases. It strikes as the same kind of ignorance that people displayed when they thought Glock let Hamilton win the title.

    I only used the word fanboy to desribe my fandom of Schumacher in 1999. I used the word bias. I shouldn’t have to explain bias as opposed to fanboyism to you. Fanboys post ‘schumaker is gay’ on YouTube, you and I are biased in our judgements because we enjoy certain drivers and teams over others, as do 99% of the rest of F1 viewers worldwide.

    I even called the races different, but stated they were both ugly cases of team orders. What more do you want me to say? I really don’t understand the need to set up a stawman in the form of the Glock-2008 conspiracies either.

    @Kingshark
    I wouldn’t call McLaren sainted, not anymore, but the fact is Ferrari was a hot target in the international autosport media for years. Dutch magazines spoke ill of any trace of team orders post 2002, ranging from Massa falling behind Schumacher after pit stops, to Raikkonen supporting Massa in late 2008. It figures Hockenheim 2010 was so broadly reported, with the impact from Austria and USA 2002 in mind. McLaren has a better PR department and, under Ron Dennis, was much less prone to criticism. I’ve heard more people talk about this thread’s radio message, than Hockenheim 2008, or even Melbourne 1998 (although I only have magazines to remind me of that.)

    #236575
    Profile photo of matt90
    matt90
    Participant

    @kingshark
    “I bet that if Massa let Alonso through, who a few laps later overtook the lead 2 cars to win the race, people would still be complaining about team orders.”
    I didn’t complain when the Ferrari drivers swapped positions at the end of the 2007 and 2008 championships. Don’t assume that just because people didn’t like Alonso and Massa swapping that they are ardent Ferrari haters who would complain regardless of the situation- you are still ignoring the fundamental difference of allowing a faster team mate through so that he can attack others and get a net benefit for the team, and simply swapping the drivers around at the front.

    @nick
    Sorry, I was actually replying to wsrgo before. I didn’t take any issue with your comment. I should have made that clearer!

Viewing 2 posts - 31 through 32 (of 32 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.