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F1

Public Group active 7 hours, 7 minutes ago

F1 discussion

Inters in qualy

This topic contains 6 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by Avatar of  Anonymous 2 years, 11 months ago.

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  • #130115
    Avatar of Enigma
    Enigma
    Participant

    In Valencia, Monza, some other races and today, we saw drivers sitting out Q3 (or even Q2, like Force India in Catalunya) obviously to save tyres. So I was wondering, why don’t teams use inters in this cases, when they’re sure it’s not going to rain on race day? If Force Indias used inters today to set lap times, they’d still be able to choose which tyre to start on tomorrow and they wouldn’t waste dry tyres that way. And they’d beat Schumacher with that (if he hadn’t done it himself, if they had left the pits at the last moment perhaps).

    Rules allow this, but stewards, Charlie and the FIA wouldn’t like that, but it would be hard to do anything about it – what if someone did it in Q3 in Spa this year, when they were all running on dries but it was slightly wet? Would it be prohibited or allowed?

    It would surely be interesting to see someone do that and to see what would happen.

    #178934
    Avatar of DavidS
    DavidS
    Participant

    Doesn’t the track have to be declared wet for the teams to be able to use wet weather tyres? I’m not sure about that one, I’d need to consult the rule book.

    I’m guessing though that the FIA would take a dim view on going out on inters, just to set an uncompetitive lap time. If I was the steward making that decision, I’d force them to start on those inters.

    #178935
    Avatar of Prisoner Monkeys
    Prisoner Monkeys
    Participant

    If Force Indias used inters today to set lap times, they’d still be able to choose which tyre to start on tomorrow and they wouldn’t waste dry tyres that way.

    No, they wouldn’t – they have to start the race on the tyres they set their best time on, but the board is cleared at the end of each qualifying period. So if they set a lap time on intermediates, that would be considered their best time, even if they were faster in Q1 and Q2.

    #178936
    Avatar of raymondu999
    raymondu999
    Participant

    Incorrect, PM. Enigma is absolutely correct.

    Article 25.4e of the FIA F1 tyre regs says:

    At the start of the race each car which took part in Q3 must be fitted with the tyres with which the driver set his grid time. This will only be necessary if dry-weather tyres were used to set the grid time and if dry-weather are used at the start of the race

    I would surmise that the intermediates would be too difficult; and it would be dangerous for them to set a time on the inters. The compound in the inters is a different one; and the chemicals and oils inside work differently. Inters have a lower optimum temperature than the dry slicks; and because of the wet conditions, inter tyres are made to be able to heat up more easily as the water will cool them. Without this cooling effect from the water (as in your scenario the track is dry), and the greater ease with which inters can build up tyre temperature you will soon have overheating tyres.

    Overheated rubber becomes kind of bubble-gummy; kind of like an eraser. It in itself doesn’t have much grip left. This would also build to a great buildup of tyre pressure. (due to the added heat). This kind of bloats the tyres and they “balloon.” This would mean that although there is roughly the same area of rubber in contact with the track, the amount of rubber is actually less; again, less grip. Also, if the core of the tyre (as opposed to the surface; imagine if you will a steak; at times you find the crust and the inner “core” of it at different temperatures) gets too hot you’ll start to get the surface breaking apart from the tyres; which is what we know as blisters.

    Blisters themselves are not actually a performance issue (contrary to what some people believe). The rubber kind of “falls apart” on the tyre and that leaves patches where there are no rubber (kind of like bald patches in hair). The only performance concern of a blister is actually that reduced amount of rubber in contact with the road. However this begins to form kind of like a “perforated line” along the tyre; and so you’re dangerously close to a tyre structurally failing, and that, along with the loss of grip of the tyres makes it very easy to bin the cars.

    Basically, in a nutshell, running inters on a dry track (at speed) will mean a lot less grip, and you’re liable to structurally damage them

    #178937
    Avatar of Prisoner Monkeys
    Prisoner Monkeys
    Participant

    Incorrect, PM. Enigma is absolutely correct.

    Article 25.4e of the FIA F1 tyre regs says:

    Well, I’m pretty sure the FIA would have something to say about it, and send Force India back down the grid.

    #178938
    Avatar of raymondu999
    raymondu999
    Participant

    It’s one of those word vs spirit of the regulations things; I agree. But I don’t agree that the FIA have a case. AT most they would deem the inters to be classified as a “dry” tyre and make Force India start on the inters; or they could choose to go to the pit lane and change tyres

    #178939
    Avatar of
    Anonymous

    It’s an interesting point and I have no idea when they don’t do it tbh! The only thing I can of is that Brundle once drove full wet tyres on a bone dry track for the BBC and he complained the whole way through say there was no grip and it was awful so maybe they don’t do it because it’ll just increase the chance of a crash.

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