Group Admins

  • Profile picture of Keith Collantine

Group Mods

  • Profile picture of damonsmedley
  • Profile picture of Bradley Downton

F1

Public Group active 50 minutes ago

F1 discussion

Is it right that speeding in the pitlane warrants the same penalty as taking out another driver?

This topic contains 4 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of Girts Girts 2 years, 9 months ago.

Viewing 5 posts - 1 through 5 (of 5 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #130842
    Profile photo of GeorgeDaviesF1
    GeorgeDaviesF1
    Participant

    Speeding in the pitlane and ruining someones race are on different levels of seriousness

    #191470

    Well, looking at it this way, they are both offences that place other people in serious danger and result in a genuine risk of injury and/or death. So you could argue they really are on the same level of seriousness.

    #191471
    Profile photo of Asanator
    Asanator
    Participant

    Speeding in the pitlane results in a fine pre-race or usually a drive through mid-race. Your ‘taking out another driver’ could range from a slight brushing of endplate against rear wheel to full on t-boning somebody out of the race and the penalties can be varied from nothing at all through grid penalties to a full on race ban or multiple race ban.

    The reason many drivers are given drive through penalties (which is what I assume you are referring to) is so that the offending driver receives some sort of race disadvantage/penalty without the need for black flagging them.

    What would you prefer, an instant black flag for every incident??

    #191472
    Profile photo of GeorgeDaviesF1
    GeorgeDaviesF1
    Participant

    No, for example Belgium 2010, Vettel got a Drive through for t-boning Button and ending his race, yet the same penalty would be applied for speeding in the pitlane or cutting a corner. Its just a thought I had

    #191473
    Profile photo of Girts
    Girts
    Participant

    Speeding in the pit lane gives one a clear advantage over his competitors, a crash usually doesn’t. That’s why drivers shouldn’t be punished for ‘causing avoidable collisions’ at all, unless they collide deliberately.

Viewing 5 posts - 1 through 5 (of 5 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.