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F1 discussion

Kobayashi’s future

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This topic contains 41 replies, has 18 voices, and was last updated by Avatar of Bradley Downton Bradley Downton 1 year, 7 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 42 total)
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  • #211938
    Avatar of Slr
    Slr
    Participant

    I was speaking to a journalist in Suzuka who also had the job of interviewing the drivers in the Paddock Club for the guets. He knows the drivers and teams very well.

    He said that Sauber find KK hard to deal with and he will be replaced next season

    @garns Was that before or after Kobayashi got his podium?

    I think we won’t find out Sauber’s line up until after Brazil. Kaltenborn said to Sky Sports that Kobayashi is not required to find sponsorship for the team to retain his seat, which I hope is true.

    I hope Sauber don’t give Gutierrez a drive next year, he definitely needs at least another year in GP2 or preferbly somewhere else. He showed some promise this year, but he’s also been reckless and downright stupid.

    I don’t know what to make of Hulkenberg possibly going to Sauber. I would be a bit surprised if he joined them to be honest. I imagine Force India wouldn’t want their main rivals to take Hulkenberg of them, so I don’t know what’s going to happen there.

    #211939
    Avatar of Bosley
    Bosley
    Participant

    Hulkenburg won’t go to Sauber, it’s a sideways step for him and he wants to be either moving forward up the grid or staying put.

    #211940
    Avatar of duncanmonza
    duncanmonza
    Participant

    Hulkenberg won’t go to Sauber and I’m pretty sure Alguersuari has already signed with them. The question is whether they will get Kobayashi or Gutierez alongside him. It will probably come down to money. I get the vibe that Sauber and Kobayashi is not going to be an item next season.

    #211941
    Avatar of TheJudge
    TheJudge
    Member

    I thiink that FI is never a chance for Kamui or Hulkenberg or Algersuari. I will be very surprised if the team can built a car as fast as this if they end up just with Sahara backing. Anyway it will be interesting to watch,where the drivers move. I was always dreaming about Koba at ferrari,but I guess Domenicalli won’t let that happen.

    #211942
    Avatar of Antonio Nartea
    Antonio Nartea
    Participant

    Hulkenburg won’t go to Sauber, it’s a sideways step for him and he wants to be either moving forward up the grid or staying put.

    With Force India’s downright HUGE financial difficulties, he might reconsider that.

    #211943
    Avatar of
    Anonymous

    I was speaking to a journalist in Suzuka who also had the job of interviewing the drivers in the Paddock Club for the guets. He knows the drivers and teams very well.

    He said that Sauber find KK hard to deal with and he will be replaced next season

    @garns Was that before or after Kobayashi got his podium?

    I think we won’t find out Sauber’s line up until after Brazil. Kaltenborn said to Sky Sports that Kobayashi is not required to find sponsorship for the team to retain his seat, which I hope is true.

    I hope Sauber don’t give Gutierrez a drive next year, he definitely needs at least another year in GP2 or preferbly somewhere else. He showed some promise this year, but he’s also been reckless and downright stupid.

    I don’t know what to make of Hulkenberg possibly going to Sauber. I would be a bit surprised if he joined them to be honest. I imagine Force India wouldn’t want their main rivals to take Hulkenberg of them, so I don’t know what’s going to happen there.

    SLR- I spoke to the journalist on the Friday arvo, so before KK got that podium position. While it was a great result (I was at Suzuka and after Mark was shunted on T2 was hoping KK would do something special and take a win) but the comments I was told (as per above) WAS NOT based on the guys ability to drive an F1 car, as we all know he can. He said that the cultural difference was the main issue and the team found that very difficult. So certainly not a slur on Kobo ability, but more a driver fit really.

    And to be honest if KK can get a 3rd, Sauber think Nico can also- and I agree.

    I will post a photo of me talking to Nico on the way into the Paddock and asking him about a Sabuer driver in 13. The cheeky grin m

    #211944
    Avatar of Kingshark
    Kingshark
    Participant

    OK. Over and over again I have heard on how Kobayashi, Hulkenburg and Di Resta are better drivers and to be honest it is getting tiresome. Not necessary here, but I’ve read it everywhere else on countless occasions. I admit this issue has been bugging me for a long time now, and it’s not just because I am a bit of a fan of Perez.

    For starters, time and time again I have heard how both Force India drivers and Kobayashi are more consistent than Perez. Well, for one, the fact that Di Resta is 26, Kobayashi too is 26, Hulkenburg is 25 yet Perez is only 22 simply cannot be ignored.

    Age is indeed a very important factor in F1. It gives a driver more experience and focus. The vast majority of people don’t even develop a judgement vs error part of their brain until their mid-20′s. Yes, Perez still does make mistakes, but he will learn from them. Alonso made countless mistakes in 2003-04, and Vettel in 2008-09. So what? Young drivers gain experience like that.

    Another thing is that people claim Perez’s podiums were lucky. Well, he certainly wasn’t lucky in Malaysia. He started 9th, and constantly made up places in the pits and via overtaking, and before you knew it he was second. If anything, he was very unlucky due Sauber’s conservative strategy and losing some 7 seconds to Alonso because they pit him a lap later for slicks.

    His podiums at Canada and Italy were indeed lucky to some extend, but how come so many other drivers who attempted to go on the optimal one-stop strategy such as Alonso and Raikkonen in Canada, or his own teammate in Monza were not able to achieve the results he did? Because he was able to capitalize on the opportunities delivered to him, taking every advantage of his fresher tires possible. Something neither Mclaren or Lotus haven’t been able to do all season.

    Can he save tires? Hell, he can do it better than anyone else on the grid. Is he fast? He certainly is. Can he drive in the rain? See Malaysia for any further reference? Can he race wheel to wheel? He has shown flashes of brilliance but also inconsistency, it will come. Does he have potential? You bet your arse he does!

    #211945
    Avatar of raymondu999
    raymondu999
    Participant

    I’m not convinced on the tyresaving business. His famous one-stop-less strategies have mostly (if not all) come from times when he hasn’t made Q3, generally allowing him to start all his stints on fresh tyres, while at the same time not being quick enough to cause undue degradation on the tyres.

    The Sauber in my view is very good on the tyres – chief designer Matt Morris said as such in the past – that he foresaw that the Sauber would be one of, if not the outright, kindest on its tyres of the 2012 cars. Let’s not forget that Kobayashi has at times been able to do ultralong stints too – and Perez has at times been unable to do them too. The inconsistency leads me to believe that for each particular driver’s personal style, it just clicks with certain characteristics of certain race tracks to unlock tyresaving capability

    #211946
    Avatar of Michael
    Michael
    Participant

    I don’t want to generalize but I think everyone will agree that Japanese people are more difficult to deal with especially since the language is such a barrier. Plus, it’s hard for them to resonate with the rest of the world. How many Japanese bands do you know who rival Pink Floyd?

    Does anyone know Southern All Stars, Chemistry or Chage and Aska besides me?

    That being said I do like Kamui Kobayashi and I do hope he does get to keep his seat at Sauber or at some other team in F1. The chances would have been much better for him if there was a Japanese constructor.

    As for his performance this year, I think he has done as well as Perez. Obviously, Perez is positioned to score more points through the 1 pit strategy and the difference between them in points is just the 18 points from Malaysia where Perez didn’t make a single pass and got P2… Unfortunately, that put huge pressure on Kamui to do well this season and his score is not really indicative of his ability rather indicative of the pressure of a crazy P2 position by his teammate…

    #211947
    Avatar of Todd
    Todd
    Participant

    Kamui to Lotus would be interesting, although very very unlikely.

    #211948
    Avatar of Kingshark
    Kingshark
    Participant

    @raymondu999

    The Sauber in my view is very good on the tyres – chief designer Matt Morris said as such in the past – that he foresaw that the Sauber would be one of, if not the outright, kindest on its tyres of the 2012 cars.

    It’s easy to discredit the driver for what he has done and give it all to the car. You are a Vettel fan, right? Sounds familiar? Sauber is a good car on its tyres, but so are Williams and Lotus.

    Let’s not forget that Kobayashi has at times been able to do ultralong stints too – and Perez has at times been unable to do them too.

    By far the other way around is more common though.

    The inconsistency leads me to believe that for each particular driver’s personal style, it just clicks with certain characteristics of certain race tracks to unlock tyresaving capability

    Yes, but Perez has been able to capitalize on these advantages and turn good pace into several podiums, the finisher is often underestimated. Something that despite having a good car, Mclaren and Lotus have failed to do over and over again this season.

    #211949
    Avatar of raymondu999
    raymondu999
    Participant

    @freelittlebirds Japanese people are VERY easy to WORK with. Probably the easiest people you ever work with. If you ever get a Japanese colleague, or partner – you’ll see what I mean

    Obviously not every Japanese person would fit that stereotype – but yeah.

    @kingshark I hear what you’re saying, but I’m still not convinced. As Kaltenborn said after the Japanese GP, some of Perez’s podiums have come from a gamble which turned out nicely. His inability to beat Maldonado to the GP2 title – even when Maldonado basically took a holiday in the last 5 races – not finishing any of them. That’s even though Hulkenberg had something like two times Maldonado’s points when they were gp2 teammates. He’s never been a star qualifier either in any category. Not to mention he hasn’t scored a single point since the McLaren announcement.

    Bottom line is – there’s no point arguing over this as we’ll just end up going in circles. But the fact is that the opinion on Perez being a future top driver is still not unanimous – which IMO is a telling sign that Perez hasn’t proven it beyond doubt that he is a future star. We’ll see next year how he fares against Button…

    #211950
    Avatar of ShaneB457
    ShaneB457
    Participant

    @kingshark

    OK. Over and over again I have heard on how Kobayashi, Hulkenburg and Di Resta are better drivers and to be honest it is getting tiresome.

    I honestly feel as though Perez, Kobabyashi, Hulkenburg and Di Resta are very evenly matched. They have all proven themselves in relatively competitive cars and all look to have enormous potential. There is no point arguing over who is better, as we would just be splitting hairs really. We will see if checo has what it takes to perform at a top team next year, and possibly even to be a future world champion.

    As for KK. Well I do feel quite sorry for him at this stage. He is a wonderful racer and very aggresive, which is unique nowadays apart from Hamilton and Maldonado (the latter maybe too agressive). To lose a driver of his racing ability would be quite sad to see. Its just a shame that F1 has become more and more about the money and not because of pure driving skill.

    I hope Sauber keep hold of him, or at least that the F1 2012 season is not his last in F1.

    #211951
    Avatar of Michael
    Michael
    Participant

    @ShaneB457

    You make a good point – KK is one of the few remaining aggressive drivers. If KK and Schumacher both leave then there won’t be many aggressive drivers in F1 and the sport will suffer.

    #211952
    Avatar of raymondu999
    raymondu999
    Participant

    @freelittlebirds @shaneb12345678910
    Aggressive – as a driver or as a racer? IMO there are more aggressive drivers out there, but maybe not aggressive racers.

    The distinction in terms of – Driver being aggressive in terms of their throttle applications, steering inputs, braking etc – how they actually “drive” the corners. Aggressive/smooth racers are more about how risk averse they are – are they a sort of Paul Di Resta type “just keep things clean, and don’t risk too much in overtaking and defines” or the Lewis Hamilton type “I’ll try to overtake him here – and if it works I look a genius, if it doesn’t I look an idiot.”

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