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Davide Valsecchi wins 2012 GP2 championship in Singapore

This topic contains 12 replies, has 10 voices, and was last updated by Avatar of AdrianMorse AdrianMorse 1 year, 11 months ago.

Viewing 13 posts - 1 through 13 (of 13 total)
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  • #132114
    Avatar of Keith Collantine
    Keith Collantine
    Keymaster

    Davide Valsecchi has become the 2012 GP2 champion after finishing ahead of Luiz Razia in the GP2 feature race at Singapore.

    Max Chilton won the race after pole sitter Luca Fiippi made a disastrous start. Filippi later crashed out at the last corner, bringing out the safety car which the race ended under.

    It was an anti-climactic end to a championship which had been closely-fought until Monza.

    The question now is whether Valsecchi, having captured the GP2 title in his fifth year in the category, has done enough to justify gaining a place in F1 next year.

    #210888
    Avatar of Prisoner Monkeys
    Prisoner Monkeys
    Participant

    The question now is whether Valsecchi, having captured the GP2 title in his fifth year in the category, has done enough to justify gaining a place in F1 next year.

    Given that it took him five years to win the title, I would say he hasn’t done enough to make it to Formula 1. Razia, too. It took them too long to become competitive, and they were only really at the front end because they were experienced and the GP2 grid has not been particularly impressive this year.

    #210889
    Avatar of AndrewTanner
    AndrewTanner
    Participant

    I just don’t see an opening for him to be honest. Perhaps if he had managed to keep up his performance more since Bahrain he would have turned a few heads but I fear he may have peaked.

    #210890
    Avatar of robk23
    robk23
    Participant

    I can’t see Valsecchi getting a drive in Formula 1, if it takes five years to win GP2 then that says it all. As I’ve said all season, the only current GP2 drivers who I think are worthy of F1 drives are Felipe Nasr and James Calado, maybe Esteban Gutierrez as well if he can get his act together.

    #210891
    Avatar of Bendanarama
    Bendanarama
    Participant

    I think its less a case of “Does he deserve a drive” and more a case of “Will a drive be available for him.” I don’t really see the mid-upper field teams taking a gamble with their lineups and I’m not sure who the lower end of the grid would want to bring him in without major sponsorship.

    AS for “does he deserve a chance at F1?”
    Yes. He won the GP2 championship. As far as I’m concerned he deserves a chance.

    #210892
    Avatar of Kingshark
    Kingshark
    Participant

    If Valsecchi doesn’t get a seat in F1 after a season in GP2 like that, then I’m afraid he’s another Pantano, sadly.

    #210894
    Avatar of Felipe Bomeny
    Felipe Bomeny
    Participant

    I think Razia will ultimately end up as a Red Bull reserve. Christian Horner, who runs the Arden GP2 team, said that Razia “deserves a drive”. Right now, Buemi is eyeing a Caterham drive. Petrov is probably leaving the sport due to a sponsorship drought and his successor will presuambly be Charles Pic. If Kovalainen is to swtich to Ferrari, McLaren, or Sauber, Buemi is an ideal replacement. His vacant reserve role would be filled by Razia, as I doubt any of the teams are interested in giving a full-time seat to either Valsecchi or Razia.

    #210895
    Avatar of Gabriel Fernando
    Gabriel Fernando
    Participant

    @kingshark
    But Pantano had a chance before going to F1, everyone knew how he was, but he did not have a chance like Grosjean.

    #210896
    Avatar of Younger Hamii
    Younger Hamii
    Participant

    I don’t see how Valsecchi & Razia’s relatively long experience in GP2 is of an hindrance in their need to step up to the next level. Glock spent just over half the duration Valsecchi & Razia have spent before becoming GP2 champion, so did Maldonado, even though his sponsorship was an influence in him getting a seat at Williams & Grosjean was in & out of GP2 obviously due to his horrid half-season at Renault in 2009. If we’re discussing about the amount of years spent in GP2 then Van Der Garde should be no exception.

    If anything, their experience should smoothen their step up to the next level of Motorsport rather than hinder it, whether it’s F1 or another single-seater series for them is questionable at this present but the gained knowledge of car setup, experience on tracks out of Europe (Bahrain, Malaysia & Singapore) & importantly for them personally, is the improvement & increased strength of them as drivers, it’s been better for them to improve in GP2 than jump to the next level & absolutely flop afterwards & lamenting in hindsight.

    #210897
    Avatar of Prisoner Monkeys
    Prisoner Monkeys
    Participant

    I don’t see how Valsecchi & Razia’s relatively long experience in GP2 is of an hindrance in their need to step up to the next level.

    Because you need to impress, and you need to impress quickly because there are younger drivers coming into the category all the time. Before 2012, Valsecchi had a handful of wins and podiums, but was wildly inconsistent and never finished higher than eighth overall. Likewise Razia; until this year, his best result was twelfth overall.

    Glock spent just over half the duration Valsecchi & Razia have spent before becoming GP2 champion, so did Maldonado

    I think you’re unintentionally proving your point here. If you were in a position where you had to choose between Glock and Valsecchi for a Formula 1 seat, would you pick the guy who took two years to become GP2 champion, or would you pick the guy who took five years?

    #210898
    Avatar of Keith Collantine
    Keith Collantine
    Keymaster

    The championship concluded with the Singapore sprint race, won fairly easily from pole position by van der Garde.

    DAMS wrapped up the teams’ title. Here’s the final top ten in the points standings:

    1. Davide Valsecchi – 247
    2. Luiz Razia – 222
    3. Esteban Gutierrez – 176
    4. Max Chilton – 169
    5. James Calado – 160
    6. Giedo van der Garde – 160
    7. Fabio Leimer – 152
    8. Marcus Ericsson – 124
    9. Johnny Cecotto Jnr – 104
    10. Felipe Nasr – 95

    #210899
    Avatar of AndrewTanner
    AndrewTanner
    Participant

    @robk23 I enjoyed watching Calado and Nasr as much as the next person, but they’re not deserving of an F1 seat justyet. Let’s see how 2013 goes for them.

    #210900
    Avatar of AdrianMorse
    AdrianMorse
    Participant

    It’s a bit sad for the current crop of GP2 drivers that no-one deserves a drive, because all the competitors are supposedly mediocre. There could be a little bit of truth in that, but I find it too easy to write off the entire GP2 field as weak. It’s not as if the drivers who stayed and performed well (occasionally) in recent years (Van der Garde, Ericsson, Leimer) suddenly dominated the ‘weaklings’. I think Valsecchi drove a strong and intelligent season, and is no less deserving of a drive in F1 than some of the drivers in F1 today. Of course, he hasn’t shown himself to be that good to be snapped up by McLaren, Ferrari or Red Bull, so he will need to find some backing, which may not be that easy in Italy at the moment.

    As for vacancies, I was surprised last winter by the number of last-minute driver changes, so perhaps we’ll see a few seats opening up again this year, too. Perhaps Glock will finally decide he has enough of running at the back and return to the US to drive Indycars. I’m not even sure Raikkonen will be driving in F1 next season. I haven’t seen him smile all year, and the last he labelled boring, just because he couldn’t find a way past a Mercedes. He’s also recently remarked that he’s not desperate to be in F1, and I’m sure his love for travelling hasn’t suddenly blossomed.

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