F1 Fanatic Live: F1 testing 2017

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1,643 comments on “F1 Fanatic Live: F1 testing 2017”

  1. I am curious whats stopping Mclaren do their own private tests in their makeshift place in the technology center just like Ferrari in the past and Mercedes when they had tyre problems?

  2. Thanks for joining in everyone, here’s the report on the final day:

    http://www.f1fanatic.co.uk/2017/03/10/raikkonen-leaves-ferrari-on-top-as-mclarens-misery-goes-on/

    And here’s the updated Lap Time Watch:

    http://www.f1fanatic.co.uk/2017/03/10/lap-time-watch-2017-pre-season-testing-day-eight/

    Thanks for following our coverage from the track over the last two weeks. We’ll be back in less than two weeks for the Australian Grand Prix!

    Before then the new IndyCar season will begin, see you this Sunday for the first race from St Petersburg.

  3. I get this feeling that Mclaren-Honda is set to retire both cars in the first GP. And even if they finish, they’d be behind everyone else.

    4 years of R&D, yet Honda seems unable to build a PU capable enough lasting a whole weekend, let alone closing performance gaps.

  4. 1. Kimi RaikkonenFerrari SF70H: 1’18.634 97 laps
    2. Max VerstappenRed Bull RB13: 1’19.438 (+0.804), 47 laps
    3. Carlos Sainz JnrToro Rosso STR12: 1’19.837 (+1.203), 116 laps
    4. Valtteri BottasMercedes W08: 1’19.845 (+1.211), 53 laps
    5. Lewis HamiltonMercedes W08: 1’19.850 (+1.216), 28 laps
    6. Nico HulkenbergRenault RS17: 1’19.885 (+1.251), 45 laps
    7. Sergio PerezForce India VJM10: 1’20.116 (+1.482), 118 laps
    8. Jolyon PalmerRenault RS17: 1’20.205 (+1.571), 30 laps
    9. Lance StrollWilliams FW40: 1’20.335 (+1.701), 113 laps
    10. Romain GrosjeanHaas VF-17: 1’21.110 (+2.476), 76 laps
    11. Marcus EricssonSauber C36: 1’21.670 (+3.036), 59 laps
    12. Fernando AlonsoMcLaren MCL32: 1’21.811 (+3.177), 37 laps
    13. Pascal Werhlein – Sauber C36: 1’24.940 (+6.306), 37 laps
    Last updated at: 17:17 CET

        1. Yeah, I’ve seen a video now (apparently just before the spin), looks like something broke, either a suspension or oil leaking onto the tyres, because the handling looked way too wobbly for his speed at that moment.

  5. It will be interesting to look at the total laps / mileages for the teams when this is all over. We can speculate over fuel loads and sandbagging, but reliability will be much clearer (yes – I’m looking at you McLaren).

  6. 1. Kimi RaikkonenFerrari SF70H: 1’18.634 72 laps
    2. Max VerstappenRed Bull RB13: 1’19.438 (+0.804), 33 laps
    3. Carlos Sainz JnrToro Rosso STR12: 1’19.837 (+1.203), 68 laps
    4. Valtteri BottasMercedes W08: 1’19.845 (+1.211), 53 laps
    5. Nico HulkenbergRenault RS17: 1’19.885 (+1.251), 45 laps
    6. Sergio PerezForce India VJM10: 1’20.116 (+1.482), 90 laps
    7. Lewis HamiltonMercedes W08: 1’20.199 (+1.565), 19 laps
    8. Lance StrollWilliams FW40: 1’20.335 (+1.701), 97 laps
    9. Jolyon PalmerRenault RS17: 1’21.211 (+2.577), 10 laps
    10. Romain GrosjeanHaas VF-17: 1’21.429 (+2.795), 54 laps
    11. Marcus EricssonSauber C36: 1’21.670 (+3.036), 59 laps
    12. Fernando AlonsoMcLaren MCL32: 1’22.412 (+3.778), 25 laps
    13. Pascal Werhlein – Sauber C36: 1’24.940 (+6.306), 23 laps
    Last updated at: 15:47 CET

  7. It is not that McL are last; it is just that they are lost!! How can one even imagine that F1 engine provider can provide such miserable performance, reliability and response?? What a shame.

    1. well.. not sure if only Honda is to blame here. There are lots of parts made by MCL and looking at last year there were some amateuristic designs ( like a broken rearwing and so on)
      So i do not count out MCL for some of the errors.

      1. I don’t see how you can assign any blame to Mclaren. Even if there are problems in the chassis, no one has found them yet because they haven’t gotten any running yet.
        2017 is 100 % blame assigned to Honda

    2. if i was MCL Fan i would blame Honda all the way because,OK last few years with the token changing the design was impossible, but this year they started and here again seems another trouble season…..

  8. 1. Kimi RaikkonenFerrari SF70H: 1’18.634 48 laps
    2. Max VerstappenRed Bull RB13: 1’19.438 (+0.804), 33 laps
    3. Carlos Sainz JnrToro Rosso STR12: 1’19.837 (+1.203), 44 laps
    4. Valtteri BottasMercedes W08: 1’19.845 (+1.211), 53 laps
    5. Nico HulkenbergRenault RS17: 1’19.885 (+1.251), 45 laps
    6. Sergio PerezForce India VJM10: 1’20.116 (+1.482), 65 laps
    7. Lance StrollWilliams FW40: 1’20.335 (+1.701), 71 laps
    8. Lewis HamiltonMercedes W08: 1’21.020 (+2.386), 6 laps
    9. Romain GrosjeanHaas VF-17: 1’21.429 (+2.795), 44 laps
    10. Marcus EricssonSauber C36: 1’21.670 (+3.036), 59 laps
    11. Fernando AlonsoMcLaren MCL32: 1’22.731 (+4.097), 19 laps
    12. Pascal Werhlein – Sauber C36: 1’24.940 (+6.306), 10 laps
    Last updated at: 14:59 CET

  9. So the latest 2017 issue seems to be that teams will have serious fuel amount issues (especially in Melbourne and Bahrein). The amount of fuel allowed is too little for the new changes, which means races will be … wait for it… fuel saving races! (oh the banter)

    1. Even if the fuel amount is increased, they are always going to run with the minimum amount required. So this will always be there I suppose.

      Until the other teams are equal in performance and adventurous in strategies to go for an extra pitstop and push all the way to the end.

      But the 4 PU rule is going to put an end to that I suppose.

      So it’s all dark either way :)

    2. There always has been and always will be fuel saving in F1 (without refueling) as any excess KG cost them dearly.
      Fuel saving is not as bad a tyre saving as it allows for more – and more strategic – racing during ‘non-saving parts’ of the GP

  10. Excellent use of ‘post-prandial’ by whoever’s manning the Force India Twitter account at the moment. There’s a phrase you don’t see often enough in F1.

    Fairly quiet at the moment, I think we may have seen the fast lappery for now, meaning Ferrari bag another two weeks of good publicity!

  11. So if the teams are able to change whatever they want on the engines now what exactly are they doing at the homologation and whats stopping Sauber from putting in hardware upgrades for the engine?

    1. Well, in Sauber’s case, I’d argue their largest constraint there would be money @rethla! But seriously, since it is a Ferrari engine, their einge supplier will have made it VERY clear that they are not able to even come close to anything like that. The Engines aren’t sold to a team, they are leased, including a crew to operate them, to analyse everything and to advice on setttings.
      Off course things are different for the ones that make the engines, but there is a process, because there are rules about providing the same engine to all supplied teams.

  12. I think Merc’s problem right now is trying to tame a beast as opposed to finding more. Corner exit speed on that merc is immense, Bottas having a bigger lift thru turn 9 than the rest, Lewis referring to the car as a ‘beast’ and just general opinion from track side observers (including Martin Brundle) kinda points to the fact that the car might be too fast. I could be wrong.

    1. it would be REALLY interesting if the expected horsepower advantage of the Mercedes unit turned out to be a hindrance. it would make for a really good season, with Mercedes dominating the faster tracks and struggling in the slower ones…

  13. Does any one have the information regarding best sector times per team for all three sectors? Usually this can be an indication of who is sandbagging. I know we all want to figure out if Ferrari or Redbull are actually going to challenge Mercedes this year, this might point to something.

  14. these cars should break f1 record lap times, but I they are 100kg heavier than the old 600kg cars, so they should be quite physical on the drivers. I wonder about the g forces on some hot days at some tracks…

    1. Physically Singapore seems to be the hardest on the drivers as is so humid, but not a high G force circuit, so it will be interesting so see at what tracks they struggle and who done their gym work, as opposed to posting photos at the gym :)

      1. Likely the race in Malaysia as it’s a high G track with plenty of high speed corners and hard deceleration zones plus the usual hot and humid conditions. That should be a real test of driver stamina his year!

        1. Yes good call there, same climate of Singapore of course.

          Some are saying it will be like the 80′ & 90’s where some drivers needed to be pulled out of the car, I don’t think it will as the physical fitness and diets are so much more advanced these days, but it will make them stand up and take notice- that’s ok, they get paid ok.

    2. The car weight doesnt affect how “physical” it is. If its high G forces its high G forces no matter what you are in. Theres no heavy wheel or janky shiftlever to hustle with so its basicly just keeping up with G forces while staying focused. With the drivers racking up several racedistances a day without braking a sweat i wouldnt be to worried about it though. Its mostly pr talks.

  15. Ferrari have made the fastest times on super softs and softs and mediums by over half a second if my calculations are correct. online comments from press at the circuit says they are the most stable car out there also. I think at the moment Mercedes only has enough to nearly match Ferrari. should be a great season. Redbull have not got much aero on their car yet, and are setting up a perfect base with their car to install quick aero upgrades. I think Ferrari v merc up to the Monaco gp, and then Redbull come to the fight.

    1. you really need to wait Melbourne before trying any conclusion, Mercedes in per-season are never very fast and then BOOM they pull a second out of the bag……

        1. Why not? It’s the last day of testing? You don’t sandbag, then turn the car up to max at Melbourne and something breaks there…. that would be lunacy. Personally, I would put Ferrari and Merc about level going into the first race.

          1. Why would they? if you lift on top speed on one of the straights you get to test everything and not reveal to the rest what times you can achieve, but still easily calculate them. Everybody’s hiding something, it’s what makes it exciting.

    1. Well i would assume they are 1 second or more quicker because of development and the rulechange is maybe adding another 5sec to that so its all in order. Maybe they didnt expect the teams making such huge improvements on their own.

    1. Should be possible. I think Red Bull is going to have a hard time matching that pace. Although it’s impossible to say what is going to happen in Australia, I do think Ferrari and Mercedes will have the upper hand.

  16. 1. Kimi RaikkonenFerrari SF70H: 1’18.634 42 laps
    2. Max VerstappenRed Bull RB13: 1’19.438 (+0.804), 26 laps
    3. Carlos Sainz JnrToro Rosso STR12: 1’19.837 (+1.203), 37 laps
    4. Valtteri BottasMercedes W08: 1’19.845 (+1.211), 46 laps
    5. Nico HulkenbergRenault RS17: 1’19.885 (+1.251), 45 laps
    6. Sergio PerezForce India VJM10: 1’20.116 (+1.482), 43 laps
    7. Lance StrollWilliams FW40: 1’20.335 (+1.701), 55 laps
    8. Romain GrosjeanHaas VF-17: 1’21.429 (+2.795), 39 laps
    9. Marcus EricssonSauber C36: 1’21.670 (+3.036), 59 laps
    10. Fernando AlonsoMcLaren MCL32: 1’22.731 (+4.097), 19 laps
    Last updated at: 12:50 CET

    1. I just hope they had about half a tank of fuel aboard, otherwise come race weekend in Melbourne and everyone turns up their engines and they’ll be sorry they got everyone’s hopes up.

    1. I started watching F1 around 1996-97, and I don’t remember them being massively handicapped with a Mercedes engine ever. Sure, it wasn’t as reliable as the Ferrari and Renault, but it could match them in performance pretty often.

      At no point would I say that Mercedes had severely handicapped Mclaren. Honda on the other hand has literally made Mclaren a back marker.

      1. Agreed, Mercedes always had performance even if they didn’t have reliability. Honda have not produced a good engine in some time. Their V8 engine was not good, deemed as heavy, not fuel efficient and peaky in its not so impressive power. The last competitive engine they produced was in the V10 era.

        McLaren though have little in the way of alternative options. It is very unlikely that Mercedes or Ferrari would give them an engine. Their original point is still valid, you are unlikely to win a championship as a customer engine team. However Honda really need to get some help in and listen to it!

          1. McLaren as you say do not deserve these engine troubles. MaddMe, where do you think they could go for an alternative engine supply?

        1. honda made a good v8 engine, what are you talking about? they all did in that era, the performance difference between the engines was only about 30hp.

  17. The average Honda engine lasts 30 laps. At this rate, they will need to supply 4 race engines per driver every race weekend. So that’s approximately 160 power units for an entire season!

  18. Current times:

    1. Max VerstappenRed Bull RB13: 1’19.491 18 laps
    2. Valtteri BottasMercedes W08: 1’19.845 (+0.354), 36 laps
    3. Nico HulkenbergRenault RS17: 1’19.885 (+0.394), 33 laps
    4. Lance StrollWilliams FW40: 1’20.335 (+0.844), 47 laps
    5. Carlos Sainz JnrToro Rosso STR12: 1’20.896 (+1.405), 22 laps
    6. Sergio PerezForce India VJM10: 1’20.950 (+1.459), 33 laps
    7. Kimi RaikkonenFerrari SF70H: 1’21.382 (+1.891), 25 laps
    8. Marcus EricssonSauber C36: 1’21.670 (+2.179), 52 laps
    9. Romain GrosjeanHaas VF-17: 1’21.714 (+2.223), 30 laps
    10. Fernando AlonsoMcLaren MCL32: 1’22.731 (+3.240), 18 laps
    Last updated at: 11:57 CET

  19. They must go back to Mercedes. It’s clear that Honda does not have any intention to get their act together. 3 Years and they have clearly shown no Progress.

    1. The point is that although they’d be faster than they are now, they would be too dependent on Merc for their liking. For example, apparently FI has weight issues because Merc lengthened the gearbox and they had to adapt.

      Not sure if it’s even true, but they point is of course Mercedes will build the engine first and foremost for their car, not their customers.

      McLaren wants to have the same relationship with Honda, and I can 100% agree that it’s the right idea to beat the likes of Ferrari and Mercedes instead of being dependent on them.

      They only thing is of course it’s not working out because the Honda engine is a piece of ….

      1. True but McLaren is no strager to Mercedes and had to act cause this situation is terrible. Look at RBR being good only their engine is not that great (Renault), McLaren know how to build good chassis but they lack a good engine so going back to Mercedes is the best option IMO

        1. Short term: absolutely. No doubt about it.

          Long term not so much because Merc will always be better at being Merc than Williams, FI and McLaren.

          McLaren weren’t satisfied with being a better Williams or FI, they wanted to be a long term championship contender. However, it’s quite obviously not working out. At all. The thing is, if they give up on their long term idea and go back to another engine supplier, where do they go from there?

          1. If I remember correct Mercedes had the same problems back in 2010 and needed 4 years to be a Top winning team but you could see every year making Progress. Honda hasn’t shown any Progress at all which is unnaceptable for one of the best manufacturers worldwide, not to mention their good past in terms of engines since the teams they worked with had the best results with their engines (Championships with Williams, Mclaren, 1999 Jordan Honda 3rd in the Championship, Prost Honda having their best finishes, BAR Honda). Their performance is unnaceptable today. Mclaren has to do something. Either they get their shit together and deliver in record time of 1 or 2 GP an engine that is close to the Top and reliable or remove themselves from F1 and stop torturing Mclaren with their amateurish ways.

      2. Mclaren needs to arrange a similar relationship with Mercedes as Red Bull did with Renault. I’m sure it will be more difficult to arrange as Mercedes’ works team is in a different league as compared to Renault…. but they will have to try and at least become Mercedes’ #1 customer team to stand a chance of even reaching the podium. With Honda, the best they can aim for is making it in to Q3.

    2. Not sure you can say they have no intention to get their act together, the Japanese have a very proud culture and don’t like to be embarrassed publically (more so than most other cultures) so this would be hurting Honda greatly.
      If they can actually get it together, well maybe that’s another story- I hope they do!

    1. That’s a really good time. With the US, it could easily be a low 1:18s. That would mean faster than the theoretical time set by Seb yesterday (1:18.7xx)

  20. Times at the Red Flag:

    1. Nico HulkenbergRenault RS17: 1’19.885 25 laps
    2. Max VerstappenRed Bull RB13: 1’20.110 (+0.225), 12 laps
    3. Lance StrollWilliams FW40: 1’20.335 (+0.450), 47 laps
    4. Valtteri BottasMercedes W08: 1’21.311 (+1.426), 25 laps
    5. Kimi RaikkonenFerrari SF70H: 1’21.891 (+2.006), 19 laps
    6. Marcus EricssonSauber C36: 1’22.101 (+2.216), 42 laps
    7. Sergio PerezForce India VJM10: 1’22.622 (+2.737), 28 laps
    8. Carlos Sainz JnrToro Rosso STR12: 1’22.638 (+2.753), 17 laps
    9. Romain GrosjeanHaas VF-17: 1’22.670 (+2.785), 23 laps
    10. Fernando AlonsoMcLaren MCL32: 1’22.731 (+2.846), 16 laps
    Last updated at: 11:20 CET

      1. If your watch was slow and unreliable.

        Could understand one bad trait.
        “McHonda is slow, but at least it’s reliable” or “McHonda is unreliable, but at least its fast”

        But, for three seasons its been this brutal combo. When will it end for this once great team?

  21. Hulkenberg has lowered Renault’s fastest time by posting a 1’19.885 on ultra softs.

    Meanwhile, Max Verstappen has finally set a representative time in the Red Bull of a 1’20.221 – only three tenths off the team’s best.

    1. Massa’s lap times were just as slow yesterday. I think they simply ran a completely different programme. I’m pretty sure they did tell Stroll to get his act together after last week, but seeing as that didn’t stop him from posting (relatively) fast lap times on Wednesday, it’s pretty unlikely that that was the reason for his slow pace.

  22. Other than Hulkenberg in the Renault, there have been no major improvements, milestones or incidents to really shout about so far this morning.

    Emphasis seems to be on longer runs. Stroll is already approaching 40 laps in the Williams.

  23. After the first hour:

    1. Lance StrollWilliams FW40: 1’22.123 25 laps
    2. Carlos Sainz JnrToro Rosso STR12: 1’22.638 (+0.515), 11 laps
    3. Kimi RaikkonenFerrari SF70H: 1’22.704 (+0.581), 7 laps
    4. Valtteri BottasMercedes W08: 1’22.731 (+0.608), 10 laps
    5. Fernando AlonsoMcLaren MCL32: 1’22.731 (+0.608), 3 laps
    6. Sergio PerezForce India VJM10: 1’22.970 (+0.847), 15 laps
    7. Nico HulkenbergRenault RS17: 1’23.345 (+1.222), 9 laps
    8. Marcus EricssonSauber C36: 1’25.345 (+3.222), 20 laps
    9. Romain GrosjeanHaas VF-17: (+), 10 laps
    10. Max VerstappenRed Bull RB13: (+), 4 laps
    Last updated at: 9:59 CET

    1. As Hulk mentioned, it helps keep fresh better. The driver does the job for half a day full out, then can relax and be fit for the next day. You can get more out of it that way.

      1. But for teams with drivers who have different driving styles, it causes more time for tune-ups, isn’t it?

        Time would be wasted aligning the car to suit the needs of a different driver during different halves of a day.

        Anyway, seems that the approach is doing something positive. Else why would more teams adopt it.

  24. Thanks as always for joining in guys, here’s today’s session report:

    http://www.f1fanatic.co.uk/2017/03/09/ferrari-fastest-but-vettel-keeps-pace-in-reserve/

    And as we head into the final day of testing a look at the fastest times by each team so far:

    1. Ferrari – 1’19.024
    2. Mercedes – 1’19.310 (+0.286)
    3. Williams – 1’19.420 (+0.396)
    4. Red Bull – 1’19.900 (+0.876)
    5. Force India – 1’20.161 (+1.137)
    6. Toro Rosso – 1’20.416 (+1.392)
    7. Haas – 1’20.504 (+1.48)
    8. Renault – 1’21.213 (+2.189)
    9. McLaren – 1’21.348 (+2.324)
    10. Sauber – 1’21.824 (+2.8)

  25. The times with only 25 minutes remaining:

    1. Sebastian VettelFerrari SF70H: 1’19.024 146 laps
    2. Lewis HamiltonMercedes W08: 1’19.352 (+0.328), 52 laps
    3. Esteban OconForce India VJM10: 1’20.161 (+1.137), 134 laps
    4. Daniil KvyatToro Rosso STR12: 1’20.416 (+1.392), 93 laps
    5. Kevin MagnussenHaas VF-17: 1’20.504 (+1.480), 102 laps
    6. Daniel RicciardoRed Bull RB13: 1’20.824 (+1.800), 112 laps
    7. Stoffel VandoorneMcLaren MCL32: 1’21.348 (+2.324), 48 laps
    8. Valtteri BottasMercedes W08: 1’21.819 (+2.795), 81 laps
    9. Pascal Werhlein – Sauber C36: 1’22.347 (+3.323), 33 laps
    10. Jolyon PalmerRenault RS17: 1’22.418 (+3.394), 53 laps
    11. Marcus EricssonSauber C36: 1’23.330 (+4.306), 88 laps
    12. Felipe MassaWilliams FW40: 1’24.443 (+5.419), 67 laps
    13. Lance StrollWilliams FW40: 1’24.863 (+5.839), 85 laps
    Last updated at: 17:35 CET

    1. Very much appreciate all pictures, and a big ‘well done’ for always finding the appropriate pictures with your articles.

      Just out of interest, where do you find those images, and do you have to pay for them or does copyright mentioning suffice.

  26. Interesting long run comparisons…

    Vettel (medium tyres): 1:23.22; 1:23.493; 1:23.792; 1:23.859; 1:23.795; 1:23.734; 1:23.679; 1:23.618; 1:23.546; 1:23.403; 1:24.390; 1:24.197; 1:24.268; 1:25.106; 1:25.818; 1:25.900; 1:29.662; 1:24.716; 1:24.978; 1:26.457; PITS

    Bottas (soft tyres): 1:24.151; 1:23.855; 1:23.383; 1:23.530; 1:23.508; 1:23.643; 1:23.849; 1:23.641; 1:23.637; 1:23.816; 1:23.927; 1:23.637; 1:23.563; 1:23.629; 1:23.537; 1:23.577; 1:23.604; 1:36.581; 1:23.177; PITS

    Ricciardo (soft tyres): 1:24.470; 1:24.530; 1:24.850; 1:24.556; 1:24.586; 1:24.586; 1:24.171; 1:24.184; 1:24.638; 1:24.274; 1:24.784; 1:24.715; 1:24.641; 1:24.743; 1:24.544; 1:24.652; 1:24.591; 1:24.939; 1:24.859; 1:24.902; 1:25.226

    1. I put this into a chart and it’s very interesting. Vettel and Bottas even until around lap 10 when Vettel starting to drop off his pace, whereas Bottas remained consistent throughout. Ricciardo very consistent, about 1-2 seconds slower than both Bottas and Vettel.

      1. Worth noting of course that Vettel is on the medium tyre, which makes his drop off after lap 10 questionable. Still consistently faster than the RBR however, although the number of laps suggests RBR could be much more heavily fuelled.

        1. Need to know the comparative age of the tyres to draw a meaningful comparison between them, the Mediums might have another stint on them and they are merely seeing where the “cliff” is

  27. Good afternoon everybody. Can’t follow the test as I did last year, so thank you all for feeding in the info. And Will for the great insight over at the circuit

    In other news, it seems that the McLaren has an electical issue today. Anyone knows if there is at least one component that works properly on that PU?

  28. Sauber becomes the third team to pass the 3,000km mark. They tend to go for high mileages in testing, of course they don’t have a simulator so they can’t do as much work back at base. And using a year-old engine should ensure good reliability early on.

      1. I’m pretty sure it is. I’m expecting them to hit number 10 tomorrow… which is the exact number of power units they’re assigned for the entire season.

        Glad to see Mclaren Honda finally breaking some records in formula 1

  29. Times at the Red Flag with two hours 23 minutes left in the day:

    1. Sebastian VettelFerrari SF70H: 1’19.024 96 laps
    2. Lewis HamiltonMercedes W08: 1’19.352 (+0.328), 52 laps
    3. Esteban OconForce India VJM10: 1’20.161 (+1.137), 87 laps
    4. Daniil KvyatToro Rosso STR12: 1’20.416 (+1.392), 76 laps
    5. Kevin MagnussenHaas VF-17: 1’20.760 (+1.736), 60 laps
    6. Daniel RicciardoRed Bull RB13: 1’20.824 (+1.800), 75 laps
    7. Stoffel VandoorneMcLaren MCL32: 1’21.348 (+2.324), 33 laps
    8. Valtteri BottasMercedes W08: 1’22.038 (+3.014), 32 laps
    9. Jolyon PalmerRenault RS17: 1’22.418 (+3.394), 43 laps
    10. Pascal Werhlein – Sauber C36: 1’23.208 (+4.184), 15 laps
    11. Marcus EricssonSauber C36: 1’23.330 (+4.306), 88 laps
    12. Lance StrollWilliams FW40: 1’24.863 (+5.839), 85 laps
    13. Felipe MassaWilliams FW40: 1’25.195 (+6.171), 28 laps
    Last updated at: 15:36 CET

  30. An hour into the afternoon session:

    1. Sebastian VettelFerrari SF70H: 1’19.024 71 laps
    2. Lewis HamiltonMercedes W08: 1’19.352 (+0.328), 52 laps
    3. Esteban OconForce India VJM10: 1’20.161 (+1.137), 69 laps
    4. Daniil KvyatToro Rosso STR12: 1’20.416 (+1.392), 58 laps
    5. Daniel RicciardoRed Bull RB13: 1’20.824 (+1.800), 51 laps
    6. Kevin MagnussenHaas VF-17: 1’20.863 (+1.839), 55 laps
    7. Stoffel VandoorneMcLaren MCL32: 1’21.348 (+2.324), 33 laps
    8. Jolyon PalmerRenault RS17: 1’22.418 (+3.394), 31 laps
    9. Marcus EricssonSauber C36: 1’23.330 (+4.306), 88 laps
    10. Valtteri BottasMercedes W08: 1’23.515 (+4.491), 12 laps
    11. Pascal WehrleinSauber C36: 1’23.536 (+4.512), 9 laps
    12. Lance StrollWilliams FW40: 1’24.863 (+5.839), 85 laps
    13. Felipe MassaWilliams FW40: 1’25.341 (+6.317), 14 laps
    Last updated at: 14:59 CET

  31. Some of the hype which is being posted about the lap times is very silly. Apparently Ferrari have “blistering Barcelona pace”. They’re 0.286 seconds faster than the next car (Mercedes).

    They may well be quickest and if they are good for them. But hype like this gets very wearisome. We had it last year when Ferrari were also quickest in testing. Their advantage 12 months ago was 0.257s – just a few hundredths less than it is right now.

    So to start talking them up to extent some people are is ridiculous. And it will only fuel the sense of disappointment if they turn up to the first race and Mercedes are still the best part of a second ahead.

    1. Well said Keith, every lap time during testing should be taken with a pinch of salt. To me the standout lap so far was Hamilton’s 1:20.4 yesterday on soft tyres and at least 16 laps worth of fuel.

    2. My hype over Ferrari is from people at the tracks (such as Ben Anderson from Autosport) who are saying that not only is Ferrari faster, but looks much more stable and planted through the corners.

      1. Karun Chandock said that at corner 5 Mercedes driveability still seems to be the best, but Ferrari.and Merc are miles better than others through corners 3,4,5 .

    3. Strange seeing this post from your Keith. If the new members are indeed looking at absolute lap times and thinking Ferrari is the fastest, they will get their answer in the first race.

      Or maybe Ferrari are indeed faster and it is what is seen in the tests.

      Why get worked up over that hype?

        1. Ah! ok. I know that Gary has been crowing from the top about Ferrari this year.

          Makes me think, if they did end up using a similar testing method as last year, it still means Ferrari did a good job this year and Merc are a lil’ worse this year.

          Since last year it was all about how the Merc was a spaceship while the Ferrari looked good but lil’ nervous around the corners, not able to gracefully ride the kerbs etc.

          28th Mar is only a few weeks away. Can’t wait.

    4. just a few hundredths less than it is right now.

      Just a ‘few hundredth’ per lap equals 1-2sec for a race.
      I believe they lost by less than 2sec on 2 occasions last year!

  32. It hasn’t been a seamless start to the 2017 season for last year’s ‘best of the rest’ Force India, with the team looking like a middle-of-the-pack team so far.

    On top of balance and exhaust issues, Auto Motor und Sport report that the VJM10 is 10 kiograms too heavy. That comes down to the bigger-than-expected new Mercedes engine, and the fact that both Sergio Perez and Esteban Ocon have increased muscle mass.

    “We told them that they can only weigh 70 kilos in Melbourne,” technical director Andrew Green said.

    Because of this extra weight, it is claimed that Force India will not be running any qualification sims in Barcelona.

  33. Here are the updated fastest times by each team for the whole test so far:

    1. Ferrari – 1’19.024
    2. Mercedes – 1’19.310 (+0.286)
    3. Williams – 1’19.420 (+0.396)
    4. Red Bull – 1’19.900 (+0.876)
    5. Force India – 1’20.161 (+1.137)
    6. Toro Rosso – 1’20.416 (+1.392)
    7. Haas – 1’20.863 (+1.839)
    8. Renault – 1’21.213 (+2.189)
    9. McLaren – 1’21.348 (+2.324)
    10. Sauber – 1’21.824 (+2.8)

  34. Ferrari is sandbagging, they are lifting off before the end line. I genuinely believe they are here to win this year. mer is slower on the same tyre.

  35. For F1 history fans, during the lunch break we’re going to have the first in our series on the 1997 season. We’ll be doing a piece on every race from this classic season, which had some interesting parallels with this one, throughout the rest of the year.

  36. It seems inherently, the Ferrari has outright pace. That said, I remember the W04 had inherent one lap pace but chewed the tyres leading to not so impressive race pace. Or the 2012 Ferrari which was slow in qualy but electric in the races. Qualifying pace is one thing, race pace quite another.

  37. Feels like Ferrari don’t want a repeat of last year when they were fastest in testing and didn’t produce during the season. Lower expectations and keep something behind for when they need it.

  38. At the Red Flag:

    1. Sebastian VettelFerrari SF70H: 1’19.314 52 laps
    2. Esteban OconForce India VJM10: 1’20.161 (+0.847), 46 laps
    3. Lewis HamiltonMercedes W08: 1’20.626 (+1.312), 43 laps
    4. Daniel RicciardoRed Bull RB13: 1’20.824 (+1.510), 34 laps
    5. Kevin MagnussenHaas VF-17: 1’21.129 (+1.815), 36 laps
    6. Stoffel VandoorneMcLaren MCL32: 1’21.348 (+2.034), 30 laps
    7. Jolyon PalmerRenault RS17: 1’22.418 (+3.104), 31 laps
    8. Daniil KvyatToro Rosso STR12: 1’22.529 (+3.215), 21 laps
    9. Marcus EricssonSauber C36: 1’23.330 (+4.016), 76 laps
    10. Lance StrollWilliams FW40: 1’24.863 (+5.549), 85 laps
    Last updated at: 12:20 CET

      1. They are breaking into 1:18s on SS as Vettel backed off by about 0.7 seconds in S3 on the 1:19.314 lap.. evidenced by the fact that the next lap’s S3 was 0.7 seconds faster (total time was 1:19.4xx).

        So, witht he US, a high 1:17s must be possible.

  39. Once again, Vettel goes purple in the first two sectors but fails to improve on his overall time.

    EDIT: He did improve, sorry. But only by hundreds of a second and audibly backed off on the straight.

  40. 1. Sebastian VettelFerrari SF70H: 1’19.341 46 laps
    2. Esteban OconForce India VJM10: 1’20.161 (+0.820), 43 laps
    3. Lewis HamiltonMercedes W08: 1’20.626 (+1.285), 43 laps
    4. Daniel RicciardoRed Bull RB13: 1’20.824 (+1.483), 28 laps
    5. Kevin MagnussenHaas VF-17: 1’21.129 (+1.788), 36 laps
    6. Stoffel VandoorneMcLaren MCL32: 1’21.671 (+2.330), 27 laps
    7. Jolyon PalmerRenault RS17: 1’22.418 (+3.077), 31 laps
    8. Daniil KvyatToro Rosso STR12: 1’22.529 (+3.188), 21 laps
    9. Marcus EricssonSauber C36: 1’23.330 (+3.989), 67 laps
    10. Lance StrollWilliams FW40: 1’24.863 (+5.522), 79 laps
    Last updated at: 12:05 CET

    1. They’ve moved up from last though!

      1. Mercedes – 1’19.310
      2. Ferrari – 1’19.341 (+0.031)
      3. Williams – 1’19.420 (+0.11)
      4. Red Bull – 1’19.900 (+0.59)
      5. Renault – 1’21.213 (+1.903)
      6. Force India – 1’21.297 (+1.987)
      7. McLaren – 1’21.671 (+2.361)
      8. Haas – 1’21.676 (+2.366)
      9. Toro Rosso – 1’21.743 (+2.433)
      10. Sauber – 1’21.824 (+2.514)

  41. Some news that Kimi ran a new spec of PU and hence the issue with fluids and the rear spin causing the accident.

    Hope Ferrari have gotten over those problems. That is more important that the times themselves.

    Ferrari will be comfortably third. It is the gap to first/second that needs to be closed.

      1. last year Mercedes fastest preseason lap was 7tenths slower than Ferraris, then in melbourne they are 4tenths quicker than Ferrari. If we take their sandbagging into account Ferrari is still need to optimise their setup and improve their engine. Dont they?

        1. Meanwhile, we haven’t heard back about the cause of that ‘original’ Vandoorne day2 engine failure – either it’s bad, or they don’t know yet (also bad) so that’s probably playing into it too.

      1. He definitely needs more time in the car and less time with whoever’s doing his media training. Trying to get him to say anything remotely interesting is tricky. It’s a shame because I’ve read past interviews with him where he’s been interesting and candid. But he seems to be another rookie who’s caught the F1 disease of speaking in press releases.

  42. That may be the best time yet for McLaren but they’re still bottom of the pile on combined times:

    1. Mercedes – 1’19.310
    2. Williams – 1’19.420 (+0.11)
    3. Red Bull – 1’19.900 (+0.59)
    4. Ferrari – 1’19.906 (+0.596)
    5. Renault – 1’21.213 (+1.903)
    6. Force India – 1’21.297 (+1.987)
    7. Haas – 1’21.676 (+2.366)
    8. Toro Rosso – 1’21.743 (+2.433)
    9. Sauber – 1’21.824 (+2.514)
    10. McLaren – 1’22.055 (+2.745)

    And yes, I know I keep saying it, but no way is the entire field covered by just 2.7 seconds!

          1. Why is everyone expecting the gap to be bigger this year?
            Last year the backmarkers where two teams that barely made it to the starting grid and then teams like McLaren and Renault figuring new stuff out and taking an off year. Only McLaren seems to be struggeling like last year so i fully expect the backmarkers being more competive this year.

  43. With two hours completed:

    1. Lewis HamiltonMercedes W08: 1’20.626 35 laps
    2. Daniel RicciardoRed Bull RB13: 1’20.824 (+0.198), 16 laps
    3. Sebastian VettelFerrari SF70H: 1’21.615 (+0.989), 31 laps
    4. Kevin MagnussenHaas VF-17: 1’22.427 (+1.801), 18 laps
    5. Daniil KvyatToro Rosso STR12: 1’22.529 (+1.903), 21 laps
    6. Esteban OconForce India VJM10: 1’22.887 (+2.261), 28 laps
    7. Jolyon PalmerRenault RS17: 1’23.283 (+2.657), 25 laps
    8. Stoffel VandoorneMcLaren MCL32: 1’23.298 (+2.672), 14 laps
    9. Marcus EricssonSauber C36: 1’24.085 (+3.459), 22 laps
    10. Lance StrollWilliams FW40: 1’25.887 (+5.261), 42 laps
    Last updated at: 10:57 CET

  44. As things are still warming up… What really happened at McLaren behind the curtains, with the exit of Dennis and the recently hired Capito ? I don’t anything about Formula 1 politics, but seems to me there was obviously a power struggle. We all know the problem Dennis had with some major investors, but on the Formula 1 side, looking at how Capito was out without even practical having time to “begin”, means that internal politics ousted him. I always thought there was a conflict in both Boullier and Capito having similar jobs, albeit with different names, in the structure. Everyone seems to be fighting for their jobs in that team. Why haven’t we heard any sacking rumours for Boullier? Maybe that was what Dennis wanted to do?

    1. Capito was definitely a Dennis hire which is why he was straight out of the door afterwards. Boullier had been brought in a while earlier. I haven’t read anyone claiming to know the inner workings of the board but I think it’s significant that many long-term McLaren sponsors have gone in recent years such as Boss and TAG. These were names which came in the early Dennis glory years. How have they become alienated from the team? That will have factored in the board’s loss of faith in Dennis I’m quite sure. It may well be more that than the team’s recent lack of results, because the strategy of teaming up with a manufacturer does make sense, Honda’s problems aside.

      1. Definitely, the McLaren-Honda partnership makes sense and going “costumer”doesn’t make much sense if one is to compete for constructors and drivers titles. Red Bull is a bit of a different situation with their history with Renault, and I would say Williams is the best case scenario I would envision a costumer relationship with an engine supplier would take McLaren to. But there should be something fundamentally wrong not only on Honda’s side for these developments. While this is McLaren Honda, its fundamentally McLaren the Manufacturer responsible overall to make everything come together. I can’t help but think there was a big reason for Dennis to hire Capito.

  45. When Hamilton does his 18th lap today Mercedes will have reached 4,000 kilometres of pre-season testing. Ferrari are next-best, they started the day just over 3,200km.

    As you’d expect McLaren is at the bottom of the pile on 1,550km. Alonso said yesterday: “We’re not fully ready to complete a race distance at the moment, and we’re only two weeks away from the first race.”

    1. Keith, do you remember if they completed a race distance in pre season testing in 2015. I remember that they had longer stints in 2015 than they do this year. I believe their longest stint this year in pre season testing has been lesser than 20 laps.

  46. A red flag for Ericsson has brought today’s running to an end. Thanks for joining in everyone. Here’s today’s report:

    http://www.f1fanatic.co.uk/2017/03/08/bottas-sets-new-benchmark-as-raikkonen-crashes/

    And here’s the fastest times for each team so far:

    1. Mercedes – 1’19.310
    2. Williams – 1’19.420 (+0.11)
    3. Red Bull – 1’19.900 (+0.59)
    4. Ferrari – 1’19.906 (+0.596)
    5. Haas – 1’21.000 (+1.69)
    6. Force India – 1’21.297 (+1.987)
    7. Renault – 1’21.396 (+2.086)
    8. Toro Rosso – 1’21.743 (+2.433)
    9. Sauber – 1’21.824 (+2.514)
    10. McLaren – 1’22.537 (+3.227)

  47. 1. Valtteri BottasMercedes W08: 1’19.310 67 laps
    2. Felipe MassaWilliams FW40: 1’19.420 (+0.110), 63 laps
    3. Kimi RaikkonenFerrari SF70H: 1’20.406 (+1.096), 52 laps
    4. Max VerstappenRed Bull RB13: 1’20.432 (+1.122), 37 laps
    5. Lewis HamiltonMercedes W08: 1’20.702 (+1.392), 41 laps
    6. Nico HulkenbergRenault RS17: 1’21.213 (+1.903), 58 laps
    7. Sergio PerezForce India VJM10: 1’21.297 (+1.987), 70 laps
    8. Carlos Sainz JnrToro Rosso STR12: 1’21.872 (+2.562), 64 laps
    9. Lance StrollWilliams FW40: 1’22.217 (+2.907), 33 laps
    10. Romain GrosjeanHaas VF-17: 1’22.428 (+3.118), 57 laps
    Last updated at: 15:59 CET

    1. Alonso got a few days in the hospital in what appeared to be a minor crash… some claim he got an electric shock…so yeah they should overreact in those situations no matter how little the incident looks like..in my opinion every second count

  48. Worth noting this year’s engines need to cover five grands prix between changes to avoid penalties. That’s 1,525km in the races alone, never mind qualifying and practice. Some teams haven’t done that much yet over six days, and they’ve had engine changes too. Mercedes and Ferrari have already done more than twice that much.

    1. least amount of laps of any team during the morning (27), but still kind of okayish; reports that the b-spec engine just arrived at the track and is currently being fitted to the car.

      never a dull session, huh? =P

      1. Looking at how long took them yesterday to swap the engine (stop the car at 10am and got back on track just before 4pm) I will be really surprise if they run anymore today

        1. Hopefully in the last 2 days we see some long runs from the engine without issues. Mclaren deserve to be with the top three battling for podiums and wins not trying to get a point or 2. Have to wait and see but the light at the end of the tunnel seems still far away.

  49. Any indication on how long a competitive racing pitstop will take with these larger tyres and cars? Is there any complications from the front wings etc that will make a racing change harder?

    1. Suspect they’ll lose a few tenths from the added weight of moving the tyres. It’ll be even more critical for drivers to stop on their marks accurately, again because of the added weight of lining everything up if they don’t.

      1. I recall having read an article about that last week (from Williams perhaps?) – the size of the tyres will apparently be more an issue with maneuvering them than the weight, and with the nuts deeper inside, will be harder to operate the wheel guns.

  50. A lot of people, myself included, suspect the times we’ve seen so far are nowhere near what the cars can actually do right now. With that in mind let’s make a realistic assumption and see where it gets us.

    Last year Williams were just under 1.7% slower than Mercedes on average. It would be a surprise if they’re closer than that this year for two reasons. They have the same engine, so they can’t gain any ground there. And Mercedes have a much larger team with far greater resources to explore the potential of the relaxed aerodynamic rules. If Williams have just kept pace with Mercedes’ rate of development and are still 1.7% behind, that will have been a good winter’s work for them.

    So if we assume Williams are at least as far behind Mercedes as they were last year, what kind of times can Mercedes do? Williams has set a best of 1’19.420, just a tenth off Mercedes. But if that 1.7% gap is still there, Mercedes can get down to a 1’18.0.

    Of course this is purely hypothetical. But based on what we know I think it’s realistic. Particularly as Pirelli were predicting the teams could break into the 1’17s when it comes to qualifying at this track.

    1. I mostly agree with your analysis, as a lap time of 1:18.0 sounds feasible. On the other hand, I don’t think Williams have shown 100% yet, and if they do have more performance in hand, those 1.7% become increasingly difficult to achieve.
      I don’t think that a 1.7% gap is some kind of soft limit for Williams. The 2016 Williams was their weakest creation under the old aero regulations, whereas Mercedes and Red Bull achieved a breakthrough that resulted in massive performance gains. These gains might have vanished under the new regulations, potentially allowing Williams to start the season quite a bit closer to Mercedes even with an undeniably much smaller development budget. Mercedes will probably use that budget to increase their advantage during the season, but I think it’s quite possible that they haven’t reached a development stage where their concept is vastly superior to most other cars.

  51. So did FI have a trouble free morning? Below I see talk of how McLaren still has issues, which somewhat masks the issues Renault teams, and especially Torro Rosso have been having, but in the 1st week, and yesterday, FI also weren’t impressive – has that changed today?

          1. Except if MercedesGP have been rumbled mixing oil into the fuel perhaps the non-works Mercs powered teams can get closer :D

  52. Here’s the quickest times by each team over all six days:

    1. Mercedes – 1’19.310
    2. Williams – 1’19.420 (+0.11)
    3. Red Bull – 1’19.900 (+0.59)
    4. Ferrari – 1’19.906 (+0.596)
    5. Renault – 1’21.213 (+1.903)
    6. Force India – 1’21.297 (+1.987)
    7. Haas – 1’21.676 (+2.366)
    8. Toro Rosso – 1’21.743 (+2.433)
    9. Sauber – 1’21.824 (+2.514)
    10. McLaren – 1’22.537 (+3.227)

  53. Times as we break for lunch:

    1. Valtteri BottasMercedes W08: 1’19.310 67 laps
    2. Felipe MassaWilliams FW40: 1’19.420 (+0.110), 63 laps
    3. Kimi RaikkonenFerrari SF70H: 1’20.406 (+1.096), 36 laps
    4. Max VerstappenRed Bull RB13: 1’20.432 (+1.122), 34 laps
    5. Nico HulkenbergRenault RS17: 1’21.213 (+1.903), 58 laps
    6. Sergio PerezForce India VJM10: 1’21.297 (+1.987), 49 laps
    7. Carlos Sainz JnrToro Rosso STR12: 1’21.872 (+2.562), 43 laps
    8. Romain GrosjeanHaas VF-17: 1’22.428 (+3.118), 51 laps
    9. Pascal Werhlein – Sauber C36: 1’23.000 (+3.690), 56 laps
    10. Fernando AlonsoMcLaren MCL32: 1’23.041 (+3.731), 27 laps
    Last updated at: 13:00 CET

    1. They’ve done the most laps of any team with a Renault engine. Suspect that’s related to the answer. I think they’ve been reliability-limited. They do always tend to give very little away in testing, but I think it’s more than that.

      1. I agree. Although yesterday they claimed to have fixed all little niggles over the weekend and the only reason they drove relatively few yesterday was because Ricciardo had a few spins that required some repairs…

    1. Everyone wrote them off when launch pictures of their car were released, it would be a fantasy story cone true if Massa came out of retirement and won the title.

  54. A quick look at the driver mileage chart: Bottas has covered the most so far, followed by Vettel, they’re the only two drivers to have passed 2,000 kilometres. Bottas has done seven race distances in five-and-a-half days of testing!

    Out of the regular race drivers it’s no surprise to see Wehrlein at the bottom (428km) followed by Stroll (512km). Massa has now done almost three times as much running as his young team mate.

  55. 1. Valtteri BottasMercedes W08: 1’19.310 52 laps
    2. Felipe MassaWilliams FW40: 1’19.909 (+0.599), 49 laps
    3. Max VerstappenRed Bull RB13: 1’20.432 (+1.122), 34 laps
    4. Nico HulkenbergRenault RS17: 1’21.213 (+1.903), 40 laps
    5. Kimi RaikkonenFerrari SF70H: 1’21.324 (+2.014), 21 laps
    6. Carlos Sainz JnrToro Rosso STR12: 1’22.139 (+2.829), 32 laps
    7. Romain GrosjeanHaas VF-17: 1’22.428 (+3.118), 40 laps
    8. Pascal Werhlein – Sauber C36: 1’23.000 (+3.690), 45 laps
    9. Fernando AlonsoMcLaren MCL32: 1’23.041 (+3.731), 25 laps
    10. Sergio PerezForce India VJM10: 1’24.059 (+4.749), 37 laps
    Last updated at: 12:12 CET

      1. It’s nice to be able to talk about the cars getting properly quicker, at least. But I wonder how much quicker they can get before we start to hear talk about them being too quick. It didn’t take long in the WRC…

  56. There’s a lot of talk about Mc Laren and Sauber are more or less surviving so going around slowly is ok… But what’s up with Toro Rosso ? Their car looked pretty sleak, they have a 2017 engine…. Any information ?

        1. True. Haas might be saved from second season syndrom due to Renault engine lagging (still they don’t seem to have the same step in performance as other cars). Renault (team) seem to be doing ok though. Force India seem also quite far from n°4 potential. Never mind, it’s only testing.

    1. And that’s the first time the five second benchmark time has been beaten (1’19.681). Worth nothing super softs are unlikely to be used at this year’s Spanish Grand Prix, though, and the weather conditions will be a lot warmer. But even so it’s a sign of progress.

  57. I’m guessing there are problems in the Mclaren garage again. If there aren’t any problems, then it looks even more ridiculous that Alonso has put in only one timed lap which is 14 seconds off the pace he should be doing.

  58. 1. Max VerstappenRed Bull RB13: 1’20.516 29 laps
    2. Valtteri BottasMercedes W08: 1’21.229 (+0.713), 31 laps
    3. Felipe MassaWilliams FW40: 1’21.618 (+1.102), 32 laps
    4. Kimi RaikkonenFerrari SF70H: 1’22.926 (+2.410), 15 laps
    5. Carlos Sainz JnrToro Rosso STR12: 1’23.569 (+3.053), 12 laps
    6. Sergio PerezForce India VJM10: 1’24.059 (+3.543), 17 laps
    7. Romain GrosjeanHaas VF-17: 1’24.201 (+3.685), 25 laps
    8. Nico HulkenbergRenault RS17: 1’24.417 (+3.901), 23 laps
    9. Pascal Werhlein – Sauber C36: 1’24.951 (+4.435), 28 laps
    10. Fernando AlonsoMcLaren MCL32: 1’34.732 (+14.216), 11 laps
    Last updated at: 11:03 CET

  59. 1. Valtteri BottasMercedes W08: 1’21.229 13 laps
    2. Max VerstappenRed Bull RB13: 1’22.172 (+0.943), 13 laps
    3. Felipe MassaWilliams FW40: 1’22.455 (+1.226), 16 laps
    4. Kimi RaikkonenFerrari SF70H: 1’22.926 (+1.697), 13 laps
    5. Nico HulkenbergRenault RS17: 1’24.417 (+3.188), 13 laps
    6. Sergio PerezForce India VJM10: 1’24.566 (+3.337), 7 laps
    7. Fernando AlonsoMcLaren MCL32: 1’35.717 (+14.488), 6 laps
    8. Romain GrosjeanHaas VF-17: (+), 9 laps
    9. Pascal Werhlein – Sauber C36: (+), 8 laps
    10. Carlos Sainz JnrToro Rosso STR12: (+), 1 laps
    Last updated at: 10:04 CET

        1. I though I read somewhere the abbreviation was kept safe for the drives for 3 years, so it only became available now.

          To me this makes sense, sort of… I guess the personal numbers of nowadays are also kept safe. I imagine some will maybe be retired for good along with the pilots (thinking of Rossi’s 46 there).

  60. Hype > goodwill > patience > frustration > ridicule > desperation….

    The whole F1 community seems desperate to see McLaren-Honda progress. Can’t imagine the next stage.

  61. This morning we’ll see:

    Bottas (Mercedes)
    Verstappen (Red Bull)
    Raikkonen (Ferrari)
    Perez (Force India)
    Stroll (Williams)
    Alonso (McLaren)
    Sainz (Toro Rosso)
    Grosjean (Haas)
    Hulkenberg (Renault)
    Ericsson (Sauber)

  62. Here are the overall best times for all the teams for the full test at the end of day five:

    1. Mercedes – 1’19.705
    2. Williams – 1’19.726 (+0.021)
    3. Red Bull – 1’19.900 (+0.195)
    4. Ferrari – 1’19.906 (+0.201)
    5. Force India – 1’21.347 (+1.642)
    6. Renault – 1’21.396 (+1.691)
    7. Haas – 1’21.676 (+1.971)
    8. Toro Rosso – 1’21.743 (+2.038)
    9. Sauber – 1’21.824 (+2.119)
    10. McLaren – 1’22.537 (+2.832)

  63. The only good thing I have seen from Mclaren in those test sessions is the fact that the engine is not the one that they will bring in Australia. I keep my fingers crossed that the race engine will be superior and trouble free.

  64. Massa and Vettel comfortably over 700 km each, Massa returned to the pits after 760 km, giving Vettel a chance to catch up in the remaining 15 minutes.
    Impressive stuff. I didn’t expect such mileages, but the drivers are obviously well prepared.

      1. … and the red flag stops them after 167 laps, or 777 km, each. They fall just short of Mercedes’ record-breaking 170 laps from Day 3, but they improve Vettel’s individual record of 139 laps (achieved on the same day) by almost half a race distance. Things are looking pretty good for Ferrari and Williams in terms of stamina and reliability.

  65. It is pretty dramatic to see McL with no main sponsor, with an engine partner that cannot put together a package drivers can go all out with after three years, both companies having spent huge amounts of money and leaving their sponsors and fans (not to say the drivers) with the feeling that once again they have a full year ahead until getting any kind of decent result. In a normal company that would be a shutdown, sale or drastic change of direction, at least.

    1. Not only dramatic but bad for the sport. F1 is nothing without the big battles of Mclaren Ferrari and Williams. Nobody cares about the rest. These are the most important teams and those who dominate the sport.

      1. It’s hard to see any new manufacturers coming in until the regulations change simply because they’d be so far behind.

        Besides which, BMW have said they’re not interested and Audi have just canned their WEC programme because VAG need to save a fortune to pay for dieselgate.

        And even if they accepted being a customer team again, who’s to say Mercedes would agree to supply them? Like Red Bull, they would surely threaten to be too competitive…

        1. Not so sure if other teams would think of Mclaren as being “too competitive”, DEFINITELY not in the league of Red Bull.

          2013 and 2014 showed that Mclaren wasn’t the top Mercedes customer team.
          2015 and 2016 don’t show the relative greatness of Mercedes chassis as Mclaren are the only one using Honda engine
          In 2016, team bosses went on record saying that Toro Rosso had the weakest engine but Toro Rosso was still fighting tooth and nail with Honda. Implying that the Mclaren chassis was definitely not “too competitive” but at par or below the Toro Rosso chassis.

  66. What’s the current record for most laps per day by a single driver? Massa and Vettel are approaching two race distances with plenty of time left to increase their tally.