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  • #258107
    Avatar of AdrianMorse
    AdrianMorse
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    @bradley13, I thought it was quite hilarious: “another guy goes off”, etc. About the crash at Imola: I did not see that one coming. Seriously, crashes like that one make me appreciate a bit more the FIA’s policy to ground the cars in anything more than intermediate conditions.

    About De Vries, it’s his third year in the 2.0 categories, so it would certainly be time for him to prove he has what it takes. I think he was third in his first race (or first race weekend), but since then he hasn’t had the success of Kvyat or Vandoorne.

    #255946
    Avatar of AdrianMorse
    AdrianMorse
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    I am a bit torn on the issue of raising the weight. On the one hand, I do not wish Formula 1 drivers to be sick and miserable because of a weight limit that could easily be changed in the regulations. On the other hand, Formula 1 cars are heavy (and slow) enough as it is.

    Mostly though, I feel that a driver’s health is his own (and his team’s, in terms of support staff) responsibility. Formula 1 is not the only sport in which a person’s weight is important. Runners, cyclists, jockeys, and many other athletes have learned how to be light in a healthy way, and perhaps this is relatively new for F1 drivers. Dehydrating yourself, not eating any carbohydrates while training, and not carrying a drinks bottle in a desert race are all overkill in my opinion.

    #242431
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    AdrianMorse
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    Pretty disappointed Frijns didn’t get the GP2 seat, I thought he had also found some sponsorship. I thought his connection to Caterham would mean a fresh start to his career. If he would have impressed in a full season of GP2, perhaps a seat would open up the following season in F1 that wouldn’t require sponsorship. As it is, it’s another year of hanging around the garage doing nothing for Robin. Exactly how much track time did he get last year at Sauber, 80 laps in the YDT?

    Even if they do give him a few FP1 runs, it’s difficult to do much to impress other teams that way, and for a 2015 Caterham seat he would still need a bag of money – a marked difference with Bottas who Williams were planning to take on merit.

    #247580
    Avatar of AdrianMorse
    AdrianMorse
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    I don’t think the cars will be that much slower over a single lap. Perhaps with the power train fully turned up, that part of the car might actually be more powerful than the current engines. I don’t know how much slower the new tyres will be (why can’t the fans have access to the tyre test that is going on now?!), but I hope that Pirelli still manage to produce some quick tyres.

    The race might be a different matter, if drivers are in constant fuel save mode; I hope it won’t be too bad. Of course, already over the last couple of years the pace of backmarker F1 cars on full tanks and old tyres was pretty terrible already, so in that regard 2014 might not be anything new. Just take a look at the lap times of this year’s spanish GP: http://www.f1fanatic.co.uk/2013/05/12/2013-spanish-grand-prix-lap-times-fastest-laps/. At the end of his first stint, Chilton was lapping firmly in the 1m35s.

    #247147
    Avatar of AdrianMorse
    AdrianMorse
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    One problem with getting rid of radio communication is that teams will find other ways of communicating with their drivers, who will then have to peer into the cockpit to find information about brake temperatures, tyre pressures, gaps to drivers in front and behind, pit stop strategies, etc. Of course, the FIA can try to put a ban on drivers receiving any information by any other means than the pit board, but in my opinion Formula 1 has far too many rules already.

    I also don’t mind the current instructions from the pit wall. Perhaps people do not want to hear messages of “save the tyres”, but then I think the problem is more that there is such a need for tyre preservation. All in all, I would like to be able to listen to more team radio, rather than less.

    #247465
    Avatar of AdrianMorse
    AdrianMorse
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    I’m actually surprised the other teams don’t run their race drivers. It seems like a good opportunity to learn the differences between this year’s and next year’s rubber, especially with a car you know well. And even if the engineers themselves might not learn much as it is a Pirelli test (though there is no need for it this time, as all teams have been invited), it might still be useful for the race drivers to get an early feel for next year’s tyres.

    I find it especially strange that Red Bull does not send Vettel, with all the fuss Christian Horner made about Mercedes using their race drivers in the Pirelli tyre test early this year. Instead, they send Buemi who has not done a single kilometer in the RB9.

    Actually, I expected Mercedes to field Bird (maybe they still will – it’s a three day test) after losing him the young driver’s test earlier this year. I wonder what colour helmets the Mercedes drivers will use, though :-)

    #215843
    Avatar of AdrianMorse
    AdrianMorse
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    I just looked up the 2003 season on wikipedia, and I find it incredible to think that after Hungary there were only three more races in the season, Italy, USA, and Japan.

    Also, if the similarities between Schumacher and Vettel continue in future seasons, will Sebastian ever win another world title?

    #246885
    Avatar of AdrianMorse
    AdrianMorse
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    I find it interesting that many people put Red Bull so low, while putting Mercedes at number 1. I would certainly like to see a change of the competitive order at the front, but what exactly have Mercedes going for them? A midseason report that they had requested wider rear tyres, and they recently blocking a 10kg weight increase. Encouraging signs, but is it enough to offset Red Bull’s track record of winning all titles in the past four years? I am not betting against Vettel and Newey just yet.

    Other than that, I agree with what seems to be the general consensus: Lotus slipping back after losing Allison and De Beer and having no money (though I don’t think they will slip that far – they still made a big step in the second half of the season when at least Allison was not there); McLaren moving back towards the front in what can only be hoped to have been an uncharacteristically uncompetitive 2013 season, rather than the start of a decline; Williams moving forward after the banning of exhaust-blown diffusers, and Force India moving up after starting on their 2014 challenger early (and hopefully a strong driver pairing in Hulkenberg-Perez!):

    1 Red Bull
    2 Mercedes
    3 Ferrari
    4 McLaren
    5 Lotus
    6 Force India
    7 Williams
    8 Toro Rosso
    9 Sauber (could have a weak driver pairing)
    10 Caterham
    11 Marussia (will these two ever move closer to the midfield? I fear that they won’t)

    #246046
    Avatar of AdrianMorse
    AdrianMorse
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    Best:
    - the unpredictability of the start of the season: in both qualifying and race there was a question of who was going to finish first (yes, Mercedes scored a lot of poles, but it was always close and anyway Mercedes have two drivers capable of getting the pole).
    - Ricciardo’s season: I think he was superb on Saturdays, and even if he was not quite as consistent on Sundays, I feel he was still better than Vergne. I think he deserved the Red Bull seat for 2014.
    And from a Hamilton fan:
    - Hamilton’s weekend in Hungary. He was fantastically quick all weekend, and on race day he was simply on fire. He made passes as soon as he came up on other drivers on a track where it is difficult to overtake – in stark contrast to his end-of-season struggles where he was unable to overtake even on circuits with straights of over 1km.
    - Hamilton’s pole lap in Silverstone. He was half a second faster than Vettel which had Sebastian wondering out loud whether Lewis had found a shortcut somewhere.

    Worst:
    - The financial struggles of F1 teams, with drivers and suppliers not being paid.
    - The farcical Quantum investment saga. From the outside it very much looks like Lotus is being strung along by a con man for six months and counting, making everybody involved look like fools.
    - Ferrari choosing Raikkonen over Hulkenberg. I would have loved to see Nico get a top drive and take on Alonso.
    - The way Pirelli is treated by the FIA and the F1 community. The tyre supplier should be able to test its tyres to ensure a safe quality product, and not be hauled in front of a tribunal when it does. Finally, Pirelli being left in the dark about a 2014 contract, with the threat of Michelin being brought in at the 11th hour, was very poor form.
    - The seeming decline of F1. The only good thing to have happened to F1 in recent history is the US Grand Prix in Austin, but reading the comments on this site it seems many long-time fans are falling out love with the sport. Even Keith, the Head F1Fanatic himself, seems to have his doubts over the current era of F1.
    - As a refinement of the above: the proliferation of silly rules in F1. The Q3 tyre rule, the mandatory pit stop rule, DRS; the problem is that these things do not go away after some time, and the next stupid rule is already looming: two mandatory pit stops per race.

    #245792
    Avatar of AdrianMorse
    AdrianMorse
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    1. Budget cap: the teams are spending too much money. Look at Lotus, they seem to be on the edge of bankruptcy due to what I can only imagine is overspending. A budget cap would also allow:
    2. Freeing up of the sporting regulations: allow testing (if there is a budget cap, teams would be free to divide their resources over wind tunnels, simulators, and on-track testing), and do away with virtually all tyre regulations. Do you want to put hard tyres on the rear, a medium on the right front and a super soft on the front left, and not come into the pits all race? Why not?!
    3. No more white-line penalties unless a driver cuts a chicane, but in general circuit design should ensure that there is no advantage to be gained by going off track.
    4. A business model of F1 where it is not prohibitively expensive for both circuits and fans to enjoy an F1 race.
    5. No more DRS; whether it is a necessary evil or not, it is quite clear that it is an evil. No overtaking is boring, but it should be tackled by car and circuit design.

    #230247
    Avatar of AdrianMorse
    AdrianMorse
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    My initial reaction to Hulkenberg to Force India is “hmmm… wouldn’t he be better off at Sauber?” But then, Nico probably has a reasonable idea how Sauber are doing at the moment. How much effort have they spent on their 2014 challenger amidst their financial difficulties this season? There is supposed to be coming money from Russia, but how certain is that, and if it comes, from when can it be expected to have a positive impact on their car’s performance?

    Force India on the other hand look a little slow at the moment, but they have switched all their attention on their 2014 car very early in the season. Also, maybe Nico expects to get paid more frequently at Force India. Either way, it’s a pity he will have to spend more time plodding around in the midfield, with no certainty of ever landing that top drive that so seems to deserve.

    #245080
    Avatar of AdrianMorse
    AdrianMorse
    Participant

    WDC – I think Webber is going to Brazil as favourite for securing 3rd. For Hamilton, there is a lot more scope for things to go wrong, as he is fighting many more drivers: Grosjean, both Nicos and both Ferraris (if Massa finds his home form again), and is pretty much guaranteed to be behind both Red Bulls to start with. Webber, on the other hand, is only fighting Vettel and Grosjean – and himself of course ;-) So if Vettel wins as expected, it is up to Hamilton to beat all his ‘direct’ competitors.

    WCC – Last year Ferrari finished second and third in Brazil, and I think the Interlagos is sufficiently atypical for the form book to be difficult to predict. Paul di Resta mentioned that for Interlagos you need traction and straightline speed, and Mercedes have not exactly been starring in those areas recently, so I don’t think the fight for 2nd in the constructors is by any means over.

    @fastiesty, I would certainly like to see at least one rain-affected race this year, and for Hulkenberg to win it. I think it’s certainly possible. The Sauber is in pretty good shape these days, and Hulkenberg’s most memorable moments have come at that track. All it takes is some rain and for Vettel to hit some kind of trouble.

    #245309
    Avatar of AdrianMorse
    AdrianMorse
    Participant

    I have high hopes for Ricciardo next season. His qualifying speed has always been in evidence, and I always felt the “Ricciardo is a qualifier, JEV is a racer” cliche was vastly exaggerated. Actually, if you look at Daniel’s race pace of the last half season in particular, it’s actually been pretty good. He may not be able to ‘speak’ to the tyres as well as Vettel, but then who can? He is still young, so perhaps he can pick up a few tricks from Sebastian next season.

    One area of concern are his starts, which have too much in common with Webber’s. Sometimes he just doesn’t get off the line and undoes all the excellent Saturday work in the first few seconds of the Grand Prix.

    #245069
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    AdrianMorse
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    The reserve driver role is a complete joke these days. Valsecchi has just spent a whole year on the sidelines for nothing. I don’t know whether he had any other options for 2013, but they would have been better than this.

    If you look purely from a performance point of view, then I understand Lotus’ decision, and anyway I’m looking forward to seeing what Kovalainen can do in the car. Short of bringing in Vettel, though (and why not, it’s not like he or Red Bull needs the points…) I suspect anyone stepping into that seat will struggle to get into the top 5 in normal conditions. However, if the probability of gaining 3rd in the championship is very small regardless of who they put into the car, then it’s not worth treating your reserve driver this way.

    #244430
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    AdrianMorse
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    Red Bull are suddenly looking very smart in choosing Kyvat. A good start to Daniil’s Toro Rosso career; this should reduce any speculation he was chosen for reasons other than his talents as a driver.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 177 total)