Alianora La Canta

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  • #316897
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    Alianora La Canta
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    All the missed races I’ve been able to find, by entry list appearance. Note that I’m including all DNSes here, so Vettel’s today will be on the list even though some wouldn’t count that. DNSs involving the driver being on track for some part of the weekend and still getting a DNS will be marked. Replacements given where known:

    Ferrari, Raikkonen: USA 2005* – tyres (thanks OmarRoncal), USA/Brazil 2013 – back surgery/salary issues with Kovalainen substititing (thanks OmarRoncal)
    Ferrari, Vettel: Germany/Britain/Europe – between substitution duties (thanks David Not Coulthard), Bahrain 2016* – power unit

    Force India, Pérez: Monaco*/Canada* 2011 – concussion with de la Rosa substituting for the latter (thanks JackySteeg), Malaysia 2014* – gearbox
    Force India, Hülkenberg: Australia 2013* – fuel leak, Belgium 2015* – power unit

    Haas, Grosjean: Italy 2012 – suspension, substituted by d’Ambrosio (thanks JackySteeg)
    Haas, Gutierrez: never

    McLaren, Alonso: USA 2005* – tyres (thanks OmarRoncal/JackySteeg), Australia 2015 – concussion (thanks JackySteeg), Bahrain 2016 – chest injury substituted by Vandoorne (thanks to OmarRoncal)
    McLaren, Button: Monaco 2003* – concussion (thanks JackySteeg), Spain/Monaco 2005 – team suspended (thanks to OmarRoncal), USA 2005* – tyres, Bahrain 2015* – energy recovery (thanks AmbroseRPM)
    McLaren, Vandoorne: never

    Mercedes, Rosberg: never
    Mercedes, Hamilton: never

    Manor, Haryanto: never
    Manor, Wehrlien: never

    Red Bull, Ricciardo: Italy 2011 – team substituted by Karthikeyan
    Red Bull, Kyvat: Australia 2015* – car broke, Australia 2016* – car broke

    Renault, Magnussen: Australia 2015* – engine
    Renault, Palmer: never

    Sauber, Ericsson: USA/Brazil/Abu Dhabi 2014 – Caterham went bust and would have been replaced by Will Stevens had Caterham become a bit less bust (thanks JackySteeg)
    Sauber, Nasr: Britain 2015* – gearbox

    Toro Rosso, Verstappen: never
    Toro Rosso, Sainz: never

    Williams, Massa: USA 2002 – switcheroo with Frentzen to avoid a 10-place grid penalty (thanks Craig Woollard), USA 2005* – tyres (thanks OmarRoncal), Hungary*/Europe/Belgium/Italy/Singapore/Japan/Brazil/Abu Dhabi 2009 – head injury with substitution by Badoer and Fisichella (thanks to OmarRoncal)
    Williams, Bottas: Australia 2015* – back injury (thanks JackySteeg)

    #313726
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    Alianora La Canta
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    @jackysteeg OK, thank you for the correction :)

    #313688
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    Alianora La Canta
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    Manor has 2 WEC seats, and all WEC entries automatically get Le Mans entries. So there will be 2 Manors at Le Mans, barring some fairly spectacular misfortune.

    #294517
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    Alianora La Canta
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    I’d take headphones and a 1-2 pairs of light earphones and experiment at the start of my time at the circuit. You can always forego them if you decide that works better – but keep at least one set of noise cancellers anyway, for the air displays.

    #294515
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    Alianora La Canta
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    I hate the change as it means I now have to squint to see the timing and scoring information. Given that I watch with people who have even more trouble reading the screens than I do, it makes it difficult to follow the races (my family has long since given up on the commentators keeping up with what’s going on). If it’s a ploy to get me to pay for the app, it’s a rubbish one because the same unreadable-to-me font is used for the data there too.

    Did anyone else notice the total absence of the “fuel used” metric – something that was rather important to understanding pacing?

    #201438
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    Paulgilb, in 1976 the best 7 results from each half of the season were counted (each half having 8 races).

    1st half:
    Lauda 9+9+6+6+9+9+4 = 52
    Hunt 6+9+2+9 = 26
    (both dropped a DNF)

    2nd half, excluding Japan:
    Lauda 9+3+4=16
    Hunt 9+3+9+9+9=39
    (again, both would drop a DNF)

    Total points to Japan:
    Lauda: 52 + 16 = 68
    Hunt: 26 + 39 = 65

    If it came to a tie, Lauda had 5 wins to Hunt’s 6 at this point. So Hunt should have won a tie (if, for example, Lauda retired and Hunt came 4th). You are correct. It may be a misprint in the thing you were reading because Grandprix.com correctly states that Hunt was aiming for 4th but thought he’d lost due to dropping to 5th for a time (he didn’t realise he’d passed two people on the last lap).

    #201437
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    To answer the title question more directly, ties are very much possible at the end of a season, though rare in the case of title deciders. This year, if the 4 winners we’ve had so far proceed to win 5 races each, come second 5 times, 3rd five times and DNF the other 5, the FIA would have to break the tie however they saw fit because the standard tie-break rules do not apply. However there is only one Champion in each category, so there will never be two F1 World Driver’s Champions of 2012 – someone has to lose out, even if it is done on an arbitary basis such as what they ate for dinner after the final race (provided that the FIA takes the decision).

    Tie-breaks happen nearly every year at the back of the grid and, in theory, can be left in such a way as to show 2 drivers tying for a non-title-winning position.

    #201436
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    Joey-Poey, crazy as it may sound, it is theoretically possible for 2 drivers to both get 2nd in the same race. It would be possible if they crossed the line at the exact same moment and the FIA could not separate them by photographic or computerised timing means (and if exactly one driver finished ahead of them). In that situation both would get the higher position and would share the points for 2nd and 3rd places equally (i.e. each would get (18+15)/2=16.5 points).

    #200492
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    I’m not sure how to rate Nico’s speed at this point. He’s spent so much of the season so far dogged with bad luck that I’m not sure I’ve seen a representative race from him yet. While drivers getting entire seasons of bad luck sometimes get dropped in favour of “luckier” drivers, that is unlikely to help us understand why Nico is getting all the mechanical failures and other-parties-responsible collisions in the Force India camp.

    #199874
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    Alianora La Canta
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    I have very mixed feelings about 2012 (one good race, one average race, one dull race and one that shouldn’t have happened). So far, it feels worse than 2011, which didn’t particularly grab me with excitement either.

    So it’s the best season since 2011, to answer the title question.

    Currently, I’d rank the seasons I’ve seen as: 2009, 1999, 1998, 2003, 1996, 2008, 2010, 2006, 2001, 2005, 2000, 2007, 2011, 1997, 2002, 1995, 2004, 1994, 2012 (so far). I haven’t put 1993 on there because judging a season on a third of one race is difficult.

    #169035
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    There’s a section on podium procedure in the Sporting Regulations (Appendix 3), but not all the requirements appear to be in there – I think some of them are verbally briefed before each podium, according to circumstances.

    As I understand it, the drivers are required to accept the trophy, stand respectfully on their assigned podium step for the anthems and then take their trophies and champagne (while meeting other regulations applying to them for the entire event, such as not mixing F1 with politics). The one thing definitely in the regulations is that they can’t be delayed on their route to the podium. The other regulations concern the behaviour of other people involved.

    I have no idea who’s handing out trophies, and the winner is likely to have theirs given out by a politician. The president of the ASN will probably hand out 2nd or 3rd place’s trophy, which in my view is not an improvement. The constructor will get theirs from a sponsor’s representative (i.e. Gulf Air), which is somewhat less controversial.

    The big thing they can do that is different to normal is they could decline to spray the champagne, since this isn’t a regulatory requirement. A simple “It didn’t feel right” would work as a defence, but attributing it to the protesters wouldn’t. Willingness to do so may depend on what happens between now and then – if there’s some major disaster (connected to the ongoing politics or not), then there would almost certainly be no champagne. Otherwise, it’s more difficult to tell. I could see Webber and the Force India drivers not spraying champagne if they took the podium. Not so sure on the others.

    #199781
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    Congratulations, @damonsmedley, on being the one to write F1 Fanatic’s 400,000th comment (and a fine one it is too :) )

    Thank you very much, Keith, for making F1 Fanatic such a great place to discuss F1 and for making us think. Also, thanks to all my fellow commentors for the debates, the ideas and the enthusiasm that turns a great blog into a great community :)

    #199263
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    That was very illuminating from Lotus. It is good that it’s standing up for itself, though I dare say some of those targeted may be feeling a bit upset…

    #180784
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    bradley13, the teams are allowed under Concorde (the bit Bernie’s bothered about) to skip 3 races per year.

    However, the FIA can penalise a team however it chooses, so anything other than force majuere would net a penalty – up to and including exclusion for missing a single race.

    The drivers are contractually obliged to race for their teams as per the contracts they have. If they don’t, in theory they could lose their Superlicences, though teams would probably sack them first if force majuere didn’t apply (the team can’t get out of its obligations so they’re hardly going to be lenient on a driver if they can help it).

    #180782
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    Lak, the London riots started precisely because the police shot and killed a suspect they were attempting to apprehend. One suspect, originally claimed to be armed but subsequently believed not to be. The suspect’s friends held a small demonstration the next day to demand answers (note that this was before the story got changed – shooting a suspect in Britain is that controversial). Some of their friends mistook this as an invitation to violence (that wasn’t the intention of the people organising the demonstration) and they attacked the police. These people had friends across London who then started attacking property in their own mirror protests. These were hijacked by random troublemakers, leading to the protests eventually seen worldwide. Most of the 3000+ arrested didn’t even remember what started the whole thing, but that doesn’t mean that one isolated incident didn’t incapacitate a large city’s nocturnal trade functioning for the best part of a week (as well as impair several other cities’ trade for some time).

    There was meant to be an inquest but evidence was lost and as a result the inquest may never happen. This is extremely controversial. The police are only meant to use tear gas and water cannon (a less dangerous alternative that might not be practical in sandy Bahrain) in certain specified circumstances, and live ammunition not only requires specialist training but can only be used in extreme situations, generally involving criminals likewise armed with guns, or mobs outnumbering the police by dozens-to-one. The police are trained in a large array of techniques that are designed to de-escalate situations without recourse to violence. (Kettling, a technique which I’ve read the Bahrain police use in these village attacks, is restricted in use in Britain due to its tendencies to aggravate those “kettled”). Police on horses and dogs, lightly-armoured vans (used as fast yet protected minibuses full of police) and foot patrols with shields, are common. Tasers (electrical stunning devices) are somewhat controversial because they can kill if badly used or if the target has certain medical predispositions, but they are nonetheless quite frequently used against violent criminals where other methods aren’t viable.

    The other key thing is respect. If people can’t respect their leaders, they won’t see any point in keeping to the laws. If they can’t respect the people who enforce the laws, they might follow the laws to a point but they’ll see no reason to take responsibility for their actions if and when they feel the line is crossed. Even if they can’t remember or can’t articulate why they felt the line was crossed in the first place. If someone in the F1 community gets hit by a Molotov cocktail from a protestor or tear gas from the government forces, it won’t matter if either side can understand the other or not. It’ll be just as injurious – and it’ll have just as powerful a negative effect upon Bahrain’s prospects of ever getting another F1 race (or any other FIA event; there’s a WEC race due to happen in Bahrain in October, lest we forget…)

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 171 total)