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  • #287256
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    Atticus
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    Sorry for bringing up an old topic, but, on a second thought, Alonso on Button was probably better – although it lasted for only the short full throttle burst between T13 and T15; I wasn’t thinking of the one when he passed Jenson successfully on lap 24.

    (Feels strange to be the only one who’s seeming to be the decider on this one. :P)

    #287255
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    Atticus
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    Another nomination could be Vergne re-passing Ricciardo out of T13 and into T14 just after their great side-by-side battle through T11-12 and after Ricciardo went ahead into T13. Ricciardo pulled off his usual dummy move before T11 as well.

    That was awesome. I’d literally split my votes in half, so I’d go 0.5 for Alonso on Button and 0.5 for Vergne on Ricciardo.

    #287254
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    Atticus
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    Alonso on Button for me. That was, for me, a closer, lenghtier and more ‘personal’ affair than when Alonso passed Raikkonen who was struggling with graining anyway.

    #287177
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    Atticus
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    On a second thought, it might not be for Button after all – Button said he will race in 2015, and I presume he meant the majority of 2015, and that third car will only contest two races.

    So a Button to Nissan (another Japanese manufacturer) is another, perhaps more likely, possibility.

    Which, of course, would leave the door open for one more driver in that Porsche seat.

    #287158
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    Atticus
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    To be precise, the additional entry is only for Spa and Le Mans.

    #285283
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    Atticus
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    My nominee would be Hulkenberg on Bottas on lap… 42, I think.

    #284396
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    Atticus
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    I still think Interlagos is as much a one-off as Austin, it’s just that my initial expectation about its tarmac was turned completely upside down (I expected it to be too oil-y to be as quick as the 2007-2013 surface, and it is somehow the opposite).

    #283554
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    Atticus
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    Did the track length change?

    #283553
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    Atticus
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    To the OP, I think so and I think your analysis comes to the right conclusion.

    Don’t forget, CotA’s track surface has just bedded in, it’s three years in operation, less oily, a bit more rough, just enough to provide ample times more grip than in 2012 and, to an extent, in 2013.

    Interlagos, meanwhile, should be slippery like a… well, I won’t make the metaphor. But, you get the picture.

    I also agree with Matthijs regarding 2015.

    #283392
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    Atticus
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    Wow, is that last turn even flat-out anymore?

    It probably is, if all else fails, the still heavy banking will make it so.

    It’s still ‘cuttable’ though, although I expect Charlie to simply say ‘you can’t go below the white line’ and that’s it.

    #282745
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    Atticus
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    Ricciardo on Alonso comes to mind. Vintage Ricciardo, but this time on high fuel and rather cold tyres.

    #281717
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    Atticus
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    I don’t have Montreal, but, by accident, I have 1955-1971 Monza. I can share it, if it’s OK as well. (It must be easier as there’s a lot less corner on that one.)

    #281401
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    Atticus
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    I like it how IndyCar keeps ovals, road courses and street circuits balanced in its schedule.

    If only F1 would do the same, at least across low-, medium- and high-downforce tracks, not to mention a race on an oval (although I understand the latter would mean an oval-spec chassis and in the current financial strain that’s be a tad too much to ask for).

    Then again, Indy cars always had their roots in oval racing, so it’s understandable they keep up a significant presence there – and also that fans were outraged, when CART went increasingly for street and road courses only.

    #279881
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    Atticus
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    @keithedin Yeah, average speeds are intriguing. I’ve looked at them ever since I read books of Nigel and Ayrton from the 1980s, where average speeds were often explicitly emphasised for some reason. I like to compare those to nowadays’.

    For example, I also like it, when I stumble upon a strange one, like the Red Bull Ring for this year. I’d have never imagined it’d be that high up on the list alongside Silverstone and Suzuka, given that it has much lower average corner speeds (at least in the first two thirds of the lap) and it arguably has lot much longer straights than Suzuka. What catched me out, I guess, was the short lap and the fact that those full throttle parts are much longer in this relation. (Also, as the previous formula, which ran on the track in 1997-2003 was more of an aero formula than an engine formula, it was ranked a tad lower back then. Last, but not least, the average speeds across the calendar decreased with the Tilkedroms as well, further elevating the Red Bull Ring.)

    #279785
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    Nice and tidy analysis, extremely well-formulated. I agree with your conclusions as well, although I’d especially wish to highlight that point 1 is not surprising and oyu might even have done a lot more work compared to what we can deduct from the car-to-track characteristics we’ve seen so far this year.

    The average speed is a good proxy, I think, but getting into the details one can say that the more flat-out sections and full throttle % a track have, the better Williams will be owing to their extremely efficient aero design and strong power unit. Vice versa, the sheer downforce level of the Red Bull gives them the advantage when there are less of the above features on the tracks.

    Another very good thing to consider – and once again, this correlates with average speeds a bit – are the aero configurations.

    Red Bull sweeps the floor with the Williams on the maximum downforce tracks (Monte-Carlo, Hungaroring, Singapore) and vice versa, Williams is by far ahead on the low downforce (Monza) and the medium downforce circuits (Montreal, Spa). What we generally term as ‘high downforce’ rounds are in fact also two categories, one being closer to the medium levels (Sakhir, Shanghai, Red Bull Ring, Hockenheim, Suzuka, Sochi, Interlagos) and one being closer to the maximum levels (Melbourne, Sepang, Barcelona, Silverstone, Austin, Abu Dhabi). In the case of the former, Williams is closer to or beat Red Bull, in the case of the latter, they generally fall a bit short.

    Furthermore, it’s interesting to note the exceptions: e. g. Red Bull, unusually, ran its low downforce aero kit in Spa, when everybody else ran on medium downforce. This gave them an unlikely advantage over Williams – but the fact that the Williams itself is so aero efficient enabled them to run Montreal and Spa in their usual high downforce configuration and still remain fairly competitive, especially in Montreal.

    And there are a couple of nice car characteristics to cross over as well – e. g. the Ferrari’s fondness of the high-speed corners, the McLaren’s excellent low speed traction and short gearing, the Force India’s short wheelbase and long gearing, etc.

    This season is a goldmine from an engineering point of view due to teams reacting slightly, but – even for the outsiders – noticeably differently to the new rules.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 134 total)