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  • #289215
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    Atticus
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    I kind of agree with your ranking. You argue as I used to do when topics I follow very closely are concerned – i. e. you always, always, cite detailed events where things went right or wrong. This basically… ‘certifies’ your opinion for me. I think I’d get more or less the same ranking, if I took my time to research his seasons in this much detail.

    #289126
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    Atticus
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    I absolutely agree. I just hope the next generation of engines (from 2016) will be equally varied in performance with a somewhat different pecking order and maybe a less dominant frontrunner.

    I’m also massively worried how the small teams are going to cope with the costs of yet another engine formula change that Ferrari and Renault would push through in their quest for defeating Mercedes. They’ll obviously have zero regards to the cost-related complaints of the small teams. They will want to win.

    #288226
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    Atticus
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    If we are to move into customer team territory, by the way, then I support Brundle’s 6 big teams + 6 satellite teams idea. For 24 cars.

    #288079
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    Atticus
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    The adjusted F1 calendar completely, literally wrecked the WEC calendar – all but three WEC event clashes with an F1 race weekend, including the 6 Hours of Spa (albeit with the Korean GP, which is TBC), putting Nico Hülkenberg’s WEC programme in jeopardy, I’m afraid…

    The provisional F1 calendar had only two clashes instead of the current five. One would hope the FIA is sensible enough not to have their two marquee motor sport series compete for fans directly…

    #288078
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    Atticus
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    ‘Only’ four clashes with F1 weekends: Hungaroring, Moscow, Slovakiaring and Shanghai.

    With luck, we might get down to two – that is if the Korean F1 round (currently TBC) will fail to go ahead still and if Slovakia negotiates another weekend for its WTCC race (which would make sense, really, as it clashes with the Austrian GP at Spielberg, in relative close proximity).

    #287999
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    Atticus
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    Double post, the whole site hanged for quite a while.

    #287998
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    Atticus
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    I usually watch other sport events – I’m a big fan of alpine skiing, downhill and Super-G. I’m also an avid follower of the Race of Champions and the Dakar.

    Last weekend, I checked out the 6 hours of Interlagos and I was fascinated by the raw racing experience, something which is missing from F1 since 2009-2010, when the tyres first got intentionally less durable than possible and refuelling got banned. I really liked the flat-out racing I saw with all the strategic complexities of the mandated fuel tank sizes dictating fuel and race strategy and the ever-advancing tyre technology making ‘double-stinting’ tactics possible.

    So I hope to find some of the other rounds of 2014 on the internet and watch how they unfolded.

    #287872
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    Atticus
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    @keithedin Our rankings are almost the same. :) The only major differences lie in placing Rosberg and Kvyat with very minor differencies in placing Pérez and Magnussen.

    I can’t help but think we either distort reality in the same way, or are both very close to being as objective as possible.

    Edit: Please, disregard my first post in the topic, I revisited my rankings a bit after that in post #287662.

    #287862
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    Atticus
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    @keithcollantine Oh, sorry, then I’d like to nominate the Talladega race and I hope that others will take on the other three (@hunocsi already did so with the Bathurst race).

    @jarred-walmsley Yeah, I realized something was not right after I revisited my post a couple of hours later, but by that time you can’t edit what you wrote. :P Bit of a shame on me, really, as I like that guy the most from the new generation.

    #287784
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    Atticus
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    Let’s see.

    The overall best I’d say was race 2 of the BTCC finale event at Brands Hatch. It had literally everything… I posted some highlights (includes clips from the less entertaining race 1 and race 3 too).

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=82JsNB63HXo

    The NASCAR Sprint Cup fall race at Talladega was also a classic. Brad Keselowski, Jimmie Johnson and Dale Earnhardt Jr. went into it in a must-win situation for them to advance to the next ’round’ (three-race segment) of the revamped Chase. Keselowski did it on the single most unpredictable race track of the calendar, holding off the much-faster pack for the last 2 laps.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rJXlzMnyYXg

    One of the most tense finishes I’ll ever saw came during the Liqui Moly Bathurst 12hrs back in February as Maximilian Buhk in the Mercedes-Benz SLS AMG GT3 with higher top speed tried to hunt down the high-downforce Ferrari 458 Italia GT3 of Craig Lowndes, the car Allen Simonsen drove before he died during the 2013 Le Mans 24hrs.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OJ2nnEE11UI

    Race 2 of the V8 Supercars’ Clipsal 500 produced another epic finish with young Shaun McLaughlin fighting valiantly for 2nd place against now six-time champ Jamie Whincup. The very definition of close-quarters racing.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hAFRS5r2g8E

    These are right up there with this year’s Bahrain, Canadian and Hungarian GPs.

    #287662
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    Atticus
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    Actually, disregard my previous post, I kind of made it into a second half rankings and not even a comprehensive one. I revisited the topic and rearranged my list – I based my judgements on race (and, to an extent, quali) pace, driver errors (in race, quali, duels, and at the start), external pressure (the closer to the top, the bigger the weight) and misfortune. Here it is with notes.

    1. Ricciardo – almost clean sheet against teammate, no errors whatsoever
    2. Alonso – same as Ricciardo, but he lost out against him in arguably favourable conditions in Austin, Budapest and almost in Hockenheim too
    3. Hamilton – dominated race pace and nearly matched quali pace against teammate, couple of quali errors, but next to no race errors, heaviest pressure
    4. Button – only slower than teammate in 5-6 races, no mistakes whatsoever
    5. Vettel – beaten by teammate tightly, but regularly, although mistake-free as usual – Ricciardo makes him look worse than he was
    6. Bottas – tightly-won battle v. Massa in terms of pace, couple of sluggish starts and quali errors when the pole was at stake (Spielberg, Sochi)
    7. Kvyat – roughly even v. Vergne on pace w/ bad luck clouding considerable late-season surge (Monza, Suzuka, Austin, Abu Dhabi), sole mistake: Pérez clash in Germany
    8. Hülkenberg – largely dominated up-and-down teammate, or had good reason not to (chassis glitch in Spa, Monza), sole error: kicking Pérez out in Hungary
    9. Bianchi – demolished weak Chilton, crucial performance under pressure in Monaco, one unfortunate mistake in Suzuka
    10. Vergne – occasional impressive displays, rare minor errors (early season starts)
    11. Grosjean – faultless as in 2013 bar Hungary, largely dominating Maldonado
    12. Massa – late-season improvement almost see him matching Bottas on pace overall, first half errors pull him down (Montreal, Silverstone, Hockenheim)
    13. Rosberg – dominated by Hamilton on race pace, narrow lead in quali, became an error-strewn driver under the weight of the championship fight
    14. Magnussen – only bettering Button for a few races mid-season, overstepping boundaries too easily in Spa, Monza
    15. Pérez – only beating teammate fair-and-square on pace on stop-start circuits (Sakhir, Montreal, Sochi), lot of errors (Monte-Carlo, Montreal, Austin)
    16. Räikkönen – like Vettel, inability to accomodate to car, utterly demolished by teammate, but no major errors, also made look worse than he was
    17. Kobayashi – dominating weak Ericsson, but no standout display and losing out in close battles v. Bianchi (Shanghai, Monaco)
    18. Gutiérrez – late-season improvement saw him bettering Sutil, too much accidents
    19. Maldonado – occasionally beatin Grosjean late-season, way too much accidents
    20. Sutil – seemingly couldn’t be bothered to be motivated, way too slow and way too much accidents
    21. Stevens – improving quickly on sole race weekend
    22. Lotterer – instantly quicker than Ericsson
    23. Chilton – hopelessly slow, Montreal crash w/ teammate was the low point
    24. Ericsson – even more hopelessly slow, Japan, Russia improvement down to better equipment, not better driving

    #287601
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    Atticus
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    My rankings would be as follows (change compared to my mid-season rankings in parenthesis):

    1. Ricciardo (-)
    2. Hamilton (+6)
    3. Bottas (+2)
    4. Alonso (-2)
    5. Kvyat (+5)
    6. Massa (+8)
    7. Vettel (-3)
    8. Rosberg (+1)
    9. Button (-6)
    10. Magnussen (+5)
    11. Hülkenberg (-5)
    12. Grosjean (-5)
    13. Vergne (-2)
    14. Pérez (-2)
    15. Bianchi (-2)
    16. Räikkönen (-)
    17. Gutiérrez (+2)
    18. Maldonado (+2)
    19. Kobayashi (-1)
    20. Sutil (-3)
    21. Stevens (new)
    22. Lotterer (new)
    23. Chilton (-2)
    24. Ericsson (-2)

    Notes (imagine the ‘I think’ prefix before each sentence):

    Top 5 – Vastly improved form from Hamilton, especially in race with his Brazil spin being his single error. Still lacking pace in quali, but at least making fewer mistakes there as well. All this under championship pressure. Kvyat improved a lot despite scoring literally no points in the second half. Stellar performances in Monza, Singapore, Suzuka, Austin and Abu Dhabi – stats won’t reveal much of that. Still they can’t beat Ricciardo to my top spot, he literally made no errors whatsoever, while being stupidly fast. Bottas likewise, but he developed a nasty habit of making less than optimal starts in the second half of the season (Monza, Austin, Abu Dhabi). Alonso had Raikkonen too close for comfort a couple of times (Spa, Interlagos), so, while making no errors, still slips down the order a bit for me.

    P6-10 – Newcomers include Massa, Magnussen (in a positive sense) and Button (in a negative). Massa eliminated his ‘rookie-like’ errors, like stalling on the grid in Silverstone, and hitting Magnussen in Hockenheim, was flawless and a couple of times faster than the highly-rated Bottas. Magnussen put on some spirited defensive drives (Spa, Monza), but faded as the season-ending flyaways kicked in. Button, at the same time, flourished and it’s only the vastly improved form of some of the above guys, that had him slip lower than his mid-season ranking. Vettel was unchanged in approach (fast, but being consistently beaten by teammate on pace bar Singapore), and Rosberg became an error-strewn driver under the weight of the championship fight, only really living up to expectations once (Interlagos).

    P11-17 – Vergne put on some fantastic display of skills in his fight for retaining his seat (e. g. Singapore, Austin, Abu Dhabi), but still increasingly often ended up as the slower STR driver on pace. Hülkenberg and Grosjean slipped way down the order. The latter had Maldonado closer than in the first half of the season, however, the former had chassis problems, was unlucky and had to fight with an ill-developed car for much of the second half. Pérez kept up his usual finess on circuits filled with low-speed corners (Singapore, Sochi, Abu Dhabi), but was sometimes slower than his teammate even on these occasions. Bianchi, sadly, had way less opportunity than others to impress further but, tellingly, was fighting with a faster Sauber when he suffered his season-ending crash in Suzuka.

    P18-24 – Gutiérrez and Maldonado both upped their game against their teammates, especially the former, who thus had teammate Sutil slipping down the order. Stevens impressed me on his debut with how well he advanced on a steep learning curve, taking huge chunks of times out of his gap to Kobayashi from session to session. Lotterer also seemed to be closer to the Japanese on his first outing than 2015 Sauber driver Ericsson managed up to that point in the season…

    #287346
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    Atticus
    Participant

    Well, as an Alonso fan, Le Mans (and Spa) would gain +1 viewer, who this time becomes glued to the screen for 24 hours, lol. Exaggerating a bit, as I often at least follow what’s going on in the race, but you get the picture.

    That would be awesome and a fair bit of publicity for both Le Mans and WEC. Just what they need – as I said, they’re going from strength to strength.

    #287304
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    Atticus
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    http://wtf1.co.uk/alonso-button-cota-battle/

    This is what I meant.

    And although Alonso outbrakes himself into T15, he had already completed the pass by that time, so we can consider it as one.

    #287256
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    Atticus
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    Sorry for bringing up an old topic, but, on a second thought, Alonso on Button was probably better – although it lasted for only the short full throttle burst between T13 and T15; I wasn’t thinking of the one when he passed Jenson successfully on lap 24.

    (Feels strange to be the only one who’s seeming to be the decider on this one. :P)

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 148 total)