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  • #294575
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    safeeuropeanhome
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    Alex Lifeson doing a Hip Hop album lol. That would be interesting to see.

    #294546
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    safeeuropeanhome
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    If Claire Williams thought Susie Wolff was 1) ready and 2) good enough, why did she then say no she won’t be driving in Malaysia the first time she is asked the question? People complain about pay drivers in F1, but even someone like Max Chilton, who people maligned as being a pay driver has a greater claim to an F1 seat than Susie Wolff. Just look at her career results.

    Nick actually already gave you some information about this. Williams’s situation is not unique, and other teams have a similar strategy. You seem to think its still like the mid 90’s when test drivers and reserve drivers still drove the cars on a regular basis and could step in easily when something happened to their main drivers. Its the nature of the beast nowadays and its not just Williams who do it.

    With the testing restrictions nowadays being a test/third driver is not all that attractive a proposition for a driver, unless they can get it in their contract that there is a chance of a race seat in the near future like Nico Hulkenberg did when he drove for Force India.

    If you were a driver of the calibre you mention, perhaps someone like Bruno Senna, Kamui Kobayashi or Heikki Kovalainen, then driving in other motorsport series is a much more attractive proposition than standing around like a spare part at every F1 race weekend, which is what happens on the vast majority of occasions if you are a third driver. What happened with Bottas is pretty rare don’t forget.

    The only people who want to accept this type of job are young drivers who aren’t established yet (think Alex Lynn) who think its a good idea to get some exposure with a F1 team, drivers with lots of money who pay their way in or drivers like Vergne who is hoping that Raikkonen will leave Ferrari at the end of this season, and that he might be in the frame if Kimi does go.

    That’s probably why Magnussen chose to stay with Mclaren too, he’s hoping he might step in if Button leaves in the near future. If Kimi stays though, Vergne will probably leave, its more attractive to race in other series like LeMans etc than to be a third driver in F1.

    #294543
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    safeeuropeanhome
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    You might want to take your own advice and educate yourself before ‘commenting erratically.’ As I said before your posts are full of holes. I still can’t get over the fact you thought the incident between Nasr and Susie Wolff happened this weekend.

    Also nice try at rewriting history, but your original argument was why did they not replace Bottas in Melbourne. You took this as a sign of Williams being too conservative, which is complete nonsense. Nice how you have changed the goalposts, now you’ve been proven wrong.

    Susie Wolff is not good enough for F1. End of story. Why do you think Claire Williams torched her chances as soon as she was asked? She knows it as much as anyone else.

    It has nothing to do with being female. F1 is supposed to be for the best drivers and she has never won a race in any car racing series she has ever competed in, stretching back over 10 years. She hasn’t even got a podium since 2004, that’s over a decade ago! We don’t need her to get a chance in a race situation to know she isn’t up to scratch. If a woman is to get an opportunity, particularly in a very good car then she must be good enough, otherwise it will hurt the chances of female drivers being chosen in the future.

    Max Verstappen at 17 years old has already achieved more in his young career than Susie Wolff. He was incredible in karts, and won 10 races in F3 last year, his first season racing cars. His potential is exceptional and very exciting. Can’t say the same for Susie Wolff.

    You think Williams might give Vergne a race seat for Malaysia? What happens when Bottas is fit again, and Vergne goes back to Ferrari? He could tell Ferrari some valuable information about the handling of the car, about their set up, about the way they do things etc. Its crazy to think Williams would put themselves in that position, when they will be fighting against Ferrari in the constructors championship. I don’t think this Van der Garde situation isn’t going to resolve itself any time soon either, maybe, maybe not but I would be very surprised if Williams gave him a shot.

    #294527
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    safeeuropeanhome
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    What, its banter to keep making the same argument, even when you’ve been conclusively proven wrong. Funny definition of banter. Your posts are full of so many holes and flaws in your logic.

    The incident between Nasr and Susie Wolff happened nearly a month ago, and yet you think it happened this weekend…?

    I also don’t know why you’re fixating on Susie Wolff. Both her and Lynn are test drivers, which is not the same as a reserve driver. Williams do not have a designated reserve driver this season. They will have to cross that bridge if they come to it, maybe bring in someone like Pascal Wehrlein if Bottas doesn’t make it. And anyway Susie Wolff is not good enough for F1, everyone knows her being given time in the car is a publicity stunt more than anything else. Just look at her results in DTM, she was absolutely nowhere. I’m not even sure the FIA would grant her a superlicence.

    You then mention Jean-Eric Vergne but don’t seem to realise that Ferrari signed him as a test driver way back in December, so he is very unlikely to drive for Williams. Van der Garde? Have you been paying attention this weekend? He has his own problems to sort out with Sauber.

    #294509
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    safeeuropeanhome
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    You are ignoring the fact that the rules did not permit Williams to put in another driver instead of Bottas, no matter how much they may have wanted to do so it is against the regulations. Its got nothing to do with a defeatist mentality.

    #293587
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    safeeuropeanhome
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    Dan this talk of Kimi’s motivation is a load of rubbish and always has been. Kimi is sensitive to the characteristics of the car and always has been so when they don’t suit him his performance drops off. That is what happened in 2008. He was a bit unlucky in 2008 with incidents and the such like, but Massa simply got more out of the car that season. People always throw this talk of lack of motivation at him because of his demeanour, but it always has been and always will be a complete non-starter.

    The Ferrari in the early part of 2009 was a horrible car and even towards the end of the season when it improved it was still very difficult to drive quickly. Ferrari brought in Fisichella who had been driving really well in the Force India when Massa got injured and he was a long way off the pace of Kimi. Raikkonen was a bit off the pace at the start of the season relative to Massa, but in the second half of the season when the car improved a bit his performance level was outstanding. Only Lewis Hamilton scored more points in the second half of 2009 than Raikkonen. If his motivation level were ever going to drop, it would have been precisely at that point then because speculation was rife in the paddock all season, and even from the year before that Ferrari were looking to bring Alonso into the team to replace him. But his performances were really good in the second half of 2009. Criticise Kimi because he requires a particular type of characteristic from a car by all means, but this talk of lack of motivation is a load of nonsense.

    #293586
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    safeeuropeanhome
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    Both Raikkonen and Ferrari have an option that they can take up for 2016, so if 2015 goes well Kimi will more than likely be on the grid for 2016. He obviously still likes driving the cars. If this year goes badly then I think it may well be goodbye though. Kimi and his partner have just recently had a baby boy so if things show no signs of improving then Kimi is at a stage in his life and career where he will walk away without any regrets.
    Allison worked with him at Lotus, he knows what Kimi likes in a car and early signs are positive that this year’s Ferrari is more suited to his driving style. As a Kimi fan I’m feeling fairly positive about this season, even if he doesn’t beat Seb over the course of the season I just want to see him competitive again, as last season wasn’t representative of his ability as a racing driver at all.
    I think that it is a bit unfair to say that Kimi’s input didn’t help on the 2014 car, that car was inherently flawed in many ways, not least of which it didn’t have a good front end which Raikkonen absolutely requires to achieve his best performance. The design work on that Ferrari chassis would have been done before Kimi joined, and given the limitations on changes to the chassis during the season Raikkonen spent all of last season trying to make the best of a bad situation with respect to the car’s handling.

    #291890
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    safeeuropeanhome
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    If F1 did adopt this rule (which it never ever will) I would stop watching. The whole point of F1 is you design, build and race your own car to the best of your ability.

    #291063
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    safeeuropeanhome
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    I prefer helmets from the 80’s, 90’s and early 2000’s, the simpler the better. Nowadays they all seem a bit homogeneous, they’re either covered in sponsorship (Yes I’m talking about you Red Bull) or really complicated with no empty space which bores me. I like simpler, more classic designs. I really liked Barrichello’s original helmet. Other favourites of mine would be Jean Alesi, Gerhard Berger, Damon Hill, Senna, Prost and Mika Hakkinen. In the main I don’t really like the way modern helmets are designed. I probably like Massa’s the best of the current drivers. Bottas’s helmet posted above is really nice though, reminds me of both Prost’s and Hakkinen’s.

    #290713
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    safeeuropeanhome
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    @matt90 I’m struggling to see that as well. I really don’t see the 08 version of Lewis dealing with setbacks as well as he did last season. Even if you are going with raw pace I would not choose 2008, given Heikki is a weak comparison in the sister car.

    #290140
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    safeeuropeanhome
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    Priaulx has had a horrible couple of years since he went to DTM, hope he shows some good form as he is certainly an excellent driver. And he will be driving for the team that won the Driver’s Championship last season, it should be a strong combination.

    Rumours are that Turkington will not be back at WSR now the Ebay sponsorship has gone so I really hope he gets a decent drive. Surely lightning won’t strike twice and he’ll be able to defend his title this time round. Plato also won’t be back at Triple 8 MG, it will be interesting to see where he ends up.

    #289977
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    safeeuropeanhome
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    Gerhard Berger talking about the aftermath of his accident at Tamburello in 1989 on Sky’s Legends of F1 programme.. Very eerie in light of the tragic events of May 1st 1994.

    ‘Ayrton called me, the next day and said ‘How are you?’ I say ‘Well, I’m OK’ and he says ‘God, what’s happened?’

    ‘And I say ‘I don’t know exactly yet what’s happened but one thing is sure, this bloody wall there, one day somebody is gonna die in it, because it’s much too close to the racetrack, and you are so fast there and if you have a technical failure there you are dead.’

    ‘A couple of weeks later Ayrton and myself walked from the pit to the place where I had the accident to see how to move this wall, and we both looked over the wall and we both said ‘Wow, there is this river in the back’. There’s not actually… the land falls down to the river, nothing really you can do. We did not think about putting a chicane or something, we just concentrated on how to move the wall. And we walked back and said ‘Well, not a lot we can do here, it is what it is’. And exactly where we looked is the place where he died. Exactly where we looked over the thing, where we said its not possible to move the wall, that’s exactly where he died.’

    #289968
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    safeeuropeanhome
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    “I’ll never speak to Pironi again in my life”. Gilles Villeneuve.

    #287944
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    safeeuropeanhome
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    Hulkenberg did well in 2013, but Gutierrez was also really, really poor which makes it harder to judge. I would like to see Hulkenberg in a better car to see how good he truly is though, he deserves that opportunity. I wasn’t impressed with him in 2010 when I thought Barrichello outperformed him but since then he has done well. I do think he is better than Perez however.

    #287932
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    safeeuropeanhome
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    @ryanwilliams You know Kobayashi’s brakes failed in Australia, right? Hardly fair to say he binned it.

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