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  • #298569
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    safeeuropeanhome
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    Rothmans. I loved the Williams’ liveries from 94-97, with the 96 design my favourite. They also had a spell sponsoring the Honda 500cc bikes before Repsol, and they were really good looking too.

    #297978
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    safeeuropeanhome
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    #297795
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    safeeuropeanhome
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    I agree, its strange. Jarno Trulli’s comments about Alonso in the roundup just brought him back into my thinking, he raced in over 200 GP’s and was in F1 as recently as 2011 but again, out of sight, out of mind.

    #297786
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    safeeuropeanhome
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    I did mention good old Zsolt way back when this discussion started. In the second post. Clearly he is so forgettable that he has actually been forgotten even during this discussion itself lol

    #297478
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    safeeuropeanhome
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    Ivan Capelli. Everyone remembers his horror 1992 season at Ferrari, and less is said about his performances at Leyton House that got him the drive in the first place (in addition to his Italian nationality).

    Ralf Schumacher’s last 2 years at Toyota were also pretty forgettable. So much so that people forget he was quite good at Williams.

    #297469
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    safeeuropeanhome
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    Yes I think Paul Di Resta will be one where in 10 years people will say, ‘oh yeah I remember that guy…’. He was decent enough but it was kind of irritating how much the British media overhyped him, talking him up for the Mclaren and Mercedes seats for example when there were better qualified candidates.

    Cristiano da Matta
    Sebastien Bourdais, he was meant to be the next big thing when he came over from ChampCar.
    Christian Fittipaldi
    Gianni Morbidelli
    Roberto Moreno

    There will be loads from the 80’s, in the old pre-qualifying days, who have gone to prove in other disciplines that they are very good drivers but were just stuck in terrible teams in F1. A few that come to mind
    Bernd Schneider, numerous DTM championships
    Joachim Winkelhock BTCC champion, German touring car champion
    Gabriele Tarquini BTCC, ETCC + WTCC champion
    Nicola Larini – DTM winner
    Emmanuele Pirro – 5 Le Mans wins

    The most noteworthy thing I remember about Pedro Diniz’s career was his Ligier caught fire very impressively once in 1996.

    #297462
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    safeeuropeanhome
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    Pic drove for Marussia in his first year and then went to Caterham.

    Scott Speed
    Zsolt Baumgartner
    Pedro Diniz – Forti (remember them?), Ligier, Arrows, Sauber. Absolute journeyman driver.
    Riccardo Rosset – terrible driver but rarely mentioned as being terrible like Inoue, Delatraz, Lavaggi etc.

    #297442
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    safeeuropeanhome
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    Ricciardo got the better of Vettel because he was faster than him in 2014.

    #297259
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    safeeuropeanhome
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    Ok I’ll play.

    Moss ahead of Fangio? I would be interested to hear the reasoning behind that. Just based on their F1 accomplishments or what they did outside F1 too? I could understand Moss being so high if you take into account stuff outside F1. But then where is Mario Andretti if that is the case. Anyway based solely on what they have accomplished in F1, my top 10 would look something like:

    1. Clark
    2. Senna
    3. Prost
    4. Schumacher
    5. Fangio

    6. Stewart
    7. Alonso
    8. Lauda
    9. Moss
    10. Hamilton

    The top 5 is a lot easier to pick for me than those outside it. I’ve thought about this before and that top 5 hasn’t changed for a long time.

    I find it hard to rank Vettel at the moment, I’m not sure where exactly where to put him.

    #296865
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    safeeuropeanhome
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    No one has more vocal fans than Raikkonen, and yet I don’t see him getting anywhere near the criticism that Lewis does. And I say this as a fan of both Hamilton and Raikkonen.

    In the UK people who are successful are not treated as well as those who try hard but ultimately have less success. The public loves a underdog, and Hamilton who has been in a potential race winning car from the very first race of his career doesn’t really fit that bill, compared to someone like Jenson Button who had to toil for a long time to achieve his success. British people seem to be the ones who criticise Hamilton more than anyone else, although I will admit that in general Hamilton seems to be a person that people either really like or can’t stand from what I have read over the years in different forums. There is no grey area, people either love him or hate him, and when you have two opposing sides with such strong feelings one way or the other then the level and extent of the criticism is going to be bigger.

    I don’t think it is racism, he just seems to have a personality that rubs certain people the wrong way. Personally I don’t care what he does in his private life, its his life, its his money, its his body and he can do what he wants. As far as I’m concerned the only thing I judge him on is what he does on track, maybe some people can’t make that distinction though. I say if he wants to dress like a rapper, who cares, as long as he drives well on track.

    I actually don’t think its unfair to call Lewis unintelligent based on his behaviour outside the car, but people confuse what he does outside the car with what he does inside it. There are different types of intelligence and its clear that behind the wheel of a racing car he is incredibly intelligent with what he does, and he always has been. But in day to day life? In his interviews he doesn’t strike come across as particularly erudite, the thing he did at Spa with putting the data on Twitter was certainly a stupid thing to do, and it doesn’t help that people often compare him to Rosberg, who speaks six languages or whatever. But intelligence in these situations doesn’t necessarily translate to intelligence behind the wheel.

    The persona out of the car gets confused with the persona inside the car. People always assumed that Rosberg must be the more intelligent driver, 1) because people like labels and putting people in boxes and 2) it fits their personality outside the car. But I think we can all see that this notion of Rosberg having superior racecraft and intelligence to Hamilton is a complete myth.

    Will Buxton wrote a blog before the decider last season where he analysed both Rosberg and Hamilton, which I thought was interesting, as he suggests that Hamilton may even have deliberately cultivated this idea that he isn’t smart in order to gain a mental advantage over his rivals. Something along the lines of ‘the greatest trick the devil ever pulled was convincing the world he didn’t exist.’

    https://willthef1journo.wordpress.com/2014/11/19/the-contenders-lewis-hamilton/ Here is the article if anyone is interested.

    #296627
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    safeeuropeanhome
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    I also think the Webber comparison is valid with Rosberg, as like Webber he got close to a world title because his teammate suffered worse reliability. Vettel lost a lot of points in 2010 from mechanical breakdowns, and as I recall Mark was rather more fortunate in that respect that year. But I think it was the change to Pirelli tyres that really affected Webber rather than some sort of mental weakness, Vettel could deal with them so much better. Don’t forget 2010 was the last season on Bridgestones, I think I’ve seen Mark say himself in interviews that he never really got to grips with the Pirelli tyres. There was that and also the team perfecting the EBD system, which always favoured Vettel’s driving style over Mark’s.

    #296626
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    safeeuropeanhome
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    I am not surprised. What we are seeing is what I think would have happened last year if another car had been able to take the fight to Mercedes on a more regular basis, as Ferrari, at least in Vettel’s hands appear to be this season.

    Rosberg knew that last season he was basically guaranteed P2 minimum at each race if his car was reliable. Its the reason the championship was reasonably close despite Lewis winning 6 more races. Nico finished second 10 times in total and 9 of those were behind Hamilton. Now with the Ferrari’s seemingly closer he can’t just rely on finishing second to Hamilton and hoping he has better reliability.

    I thought it was interesting you included Damon Hill in your initial example as someone who bounced back to win the title. He did but it took him a year to regroup in order to do it. He was very poor in 1995. In fact its the reason Williams decided to replace him with Frentzen for 1997, because they thought he was past it based on his performances in 95. If Damon had driven in 95 like he did in either 94 or 96 he probably would have been a lot closer to Schumacher at the end of the season.

    #295960
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    safeeuropeanhome
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    Plato had a four second lead in Race 2, and he was absolutely cruising. It would have been inexplicable for him to make a mistake, and it looked like a puncture at the time because he turned in and the car just went wide and understeered off the track like there was no grip. His pace was really impressive before that, he was the quickest driver on track with 57kg of ballast on board, seems ominous for the rest of the season.

    #295959
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    safeeuropeanhome
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    @Atticus Race 2 was interesting because Priaulx and Shedden were fighting for 2nd place with about five laps left, Priaulx overtook him but then Shedden got him back immediately. But then Plato went off and all of a sudden they were fighting for the lead instead! Turkington was very close behind as well, but he didn’t really get involved in the fight properly. Shedden had it under control going into the last lap, but then he got blocked a bit by traffic going through Graham Hill Bend and Surtees and he left a small gap into Clearways that Priaulx went for. They were saying in commentary that the BMW had been the slowest car through the speed trap all weekend, which cost Priaulx here as Shedden managed to outdrag him to the line. It was certainly a very enjoyable race to watch.

    #295957
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    safeeuropeanhome
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    I watched races 1 and 2, but had to go out before race 3 so I don’t know if they elaborated but was there a reason Plato went off? I find it hard to believe that he would make such a seemingly rookie mistake when he had such a big lead and should have been in cruise control. Tim Harvey mentioned the possibility of a puncture, and there was debris on the track around Paddock and Druids. Can anyone confirm?

    I think Plato is clear favourite for the title after today’s performance of the VW, even after his bad luck today in Race 2 meant he lost a lot of points. Turkington does not have his experience driving FWD cars, but he should run him close. The Honda will improve and Shedden is a great driver, but will it be consistently quick everywhere, which is what you need to win titles? Looking forward to the rest of the season.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 182 total)