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  • #303734
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    dragoll
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    the way Verstappen makes F1 look like a Playstation game amuses me and frightens me at the same time.

    @matthijs hits the nail on the head. Watching that vision @xtwl linked is quite good, because Ant Davidson explains it perfectly, Verstappen is raw talent atm. I wonder if we’ll see Verstappen go the way of Schumi or the way of his father, showing initial talent and then becoming a journeyman of the sport with no real achievements to his name.

    As for my vote, Verstappen on Nasr around the outside at blanchimont. I think the reason why I’m not too concerned about track limits, is because if he was any wider, he would have been closely inspecting the wall where De Jong went off in the GP2 race, which in its own right provides the necessary requirement of “punishment for taking too much” for my liking.

    #303338
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    dragoll
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    I wonder with all this asphalt being laid around all the tracks, whether Bernie owns a bitumen factory somewhere in Europe, it might explain all this new run off area.

    Bernie, wise up, buy some astro turf factories, think of all the money you can rake in, not only would you get the money for the strip of astro laid initially, but you’ll get another purchase after each weekend of racing as it will need to be replaced. Think of the money… Oh yeah, make the astro turf greasy.

    #303199
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    dragoll
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    Schumi ran with a 4 wheel steering (front and rear wheels turned) Benetton F1 car in the last 2 rounds of the 1993 season.

    #303081
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    dragoll
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    @atticus-2 don’t get me wrong, both those circuits I’ve mentioned will always remain as legendary circuits, however, I think Watkins Glen will remain legendary to me, in the same sense as Avon and Paul Ricard. These circuits were of greatness in yesteryear.

    Laguna Seca, to me is exactly what epitomises Indy Car, and for me is one of the circuits, like Road Atlanta, or Elkart Lake that Indy Car found its spiritual home. I was just making the point that everyone raves on about the corkscrew, which to me is there initially because it functionally served a purpose, it was the only way the course designers could get the circuit to go down the hill again after they reached the top, without plunging into the river behind. Its almost as if, the corkscrew is some circus attraction, while the rest of the circuit on its own is quite technical and rewards both aggressive and patient drivers alike.

    #303051
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    dragoll
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    Watkins Glen is only passable as a road course for Nascar, it doesn’t particularly offer me anything for open-wheelers.
    Laguna Seca is a good circuit, but the corkscrew is overrated, it isn’t really an overtaking place, because of the right hand kink leading into it, unless thats been modified recently.

    #303048
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    dragoll
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    Keke Rosberg, Nico’s father, won the 1982 WDC with only 1 victory throughout the entire season. Wouldn’t that be a great xmas story in the Rosberg family household.

    #303047
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    dragoll
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    Why did they stop going there in the first place? It is one of the better circuits in America.

    #303044
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    dragoll
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    Some people might dispute this, but the 96 Ferrari was a bad car.

    Schumacher won 3 times in it, 1st time was in the rain where he was lapping up to 4 secs a lap faster than anyone else in teh conditions, the 2nd was at spa where a bad SC call for Villeneuve and Hill handed the race to the German, and the last win was the Italian GP, the williams duo hit a stack of tyres, in separate incidents, that forced Hill into retirement after comfortably leading and JV had suspension damage after his encounter early on.

    Essentially it was a season dominated by the Williams (175 Points WCC) and Ferrari finished 2nd (70 points in WCC) in the constructors championship 2 points ahead of Benetton in 3rd. Schumacher would not have been able to win any of those 3 races with the circumstances he found himself in. Eddie Irvine (teammate) finished 11th in drivers championship while Schumacher was 3rd.

    #303043
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    dragoll
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    I’m not a Damon fan, but the 97 Arrows victory he had in Hungary was probably in a pretty ordinary car.

    #303015
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    dragoll
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    How about this gorgeously hideous 98′ Williams

    Or this mid 90’s Lola

    And its been mentioned before, but I think it takes the crown, the Honda Earth Dreams vehicle… I can’t even call it an F1 car…

    #303013
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    dragoll
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    No one I don’t think has touched on your question @espnb – I think you need to include all those examples, regardless of the money that has gone into it, look at Vettel’s victories this year, Ferrari have thrown everything but the kitchen sink this year, but I think its still an underdog performance to knock Mercedes off the top step. Just like Ricciardo’s victories last year.

    Now on to the fun stuff, highlighting all the underdog moments :P

    some of my favourite under dog moments:

    • Senna’s drive in the toleman at Monaco (85 I think), to finish 2nd.
    • Schumacher’s finish on the podium after being stuck in 5th gear in Spain 94.
    • Schumacher’s spanish gp victory in 96 in the wet, in a dog of a Ferrari.
    • Mark Webber’s 5th place finish to score points for the Minardi team at his home grand prix.
    • Seb’s first victory in a Torro Rosso at Italy in 2008
    • Seb’s 2 victories in 2015
    • Jules’ 9th place at Monaco in 2014 in a Marussia. (still have a heavy heart)

    There are numerous others as well, some are victories, some are struggles that outshine the victor’s own efforts.

    #303005
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    dragoll
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    @omarr-pepper Actually, there is some merit in what you have proposed. I can see that if a driver falls back too much in qualy, i.e. to 20th and doesn’t make it through the pack, then the points they’ve gained may not be of any consequence, compared to the points of winning the race, however, if drivers attempted to lose maybe 3 or 4 places in qualy and try to pass each other to get the win, then it would be interesting.

    However, my previous point stands, the idea of motorsport is to find out who has the fastest car, by changing the rules to essentially reward someone for making up spots will mean that drivers won’t try 100% qualifying, thus changing how qualy is perceived, and I don’t think for the better. At the moment, qualifying shows who has the fastest raw one lap pace, while the race shows who has better speed over a longer distance, I like this, as we saw Senna was better at qualifying than Prost, and we see today that drivers like Hulk are better over 1 lap than their counterparts.

    The other point I’d make too, is that you would basically make the number of pole positions stat irrelevant; if we found Massa/Bottas and drivers who don’t necessarily vey for pole regularly take out pole after pole as other drivers like Vettel/Hamilton drop back a few places to pick up some extra points, then the number of pole positions statistics would become irrelevant, and the likes of Schumacher/Senna/Vettel/Hamilton who hold high numbers in this stat currently, would be among other drivers who may not necessarily deserve the accolades.

    #302884
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    dragoll
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    @pt I wasn’t having a go at you specifically, I had noticed quite a few comments about trying to “entertain” the sport in general.

    However, while I’m on the topic, your idea of giving points for overtaking will end up being very complicated very quickly; you need to work out rules on how to stop team mates from overtaking each other 400 times a race and then duke it out for the championship in the last race. You also need to stop a faster car from dropping behind say a marrussia and then overtaking it just for a point. You also need to work out how you would be able to show spectators at the track who has racked up points from overtakes, etc… While not impossible, I just see it being too complicated for what purpose? For artificial scenarios where you have a Mercedes drop to the back of the grid and passing everyone for points.

    #302853
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    dragoll
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    I don’t understand the mentality of some of the comments in this thread. F1 is a sport, and the concept of a sport is to determine who is better. In motor racing, this has historically meant which car is better, however, many fans, including in this forum have gravitated to supporting a driver, rather than a car. I understand that, it is easier to support a fellow human being. However, this notion that F1 should be for our entertainment is rather bizare. I fully understand that for F1 to succeed, there has to be a certain level of interest from sponsors, however, people are suggesting that they want to an unpredictable race every other weekend, this is just absurd.

    If you force unpredictability, by way of rules, gimmicks, and other such outside influences, then the result will be an artificial event. The result of this artificial event will be that people will become de-sensitised to weird and unusual events as they become the norm. This will leave the traditional fan by the way-side, as a traditional fan will be left feeling empty, because no matter how much their team/driver tries to improve their performance, some outside influence, conjured up to entertain the masses, will leave this fan feeling empty and bewildered about the sport.

    F1 is a sport. Don’t turn it into WWE on wheels, or worse, Nascar…

    #302210
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    dragoll
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    We actually have a very similar rule in AFL football in australia, where current players and coaches are not allowed to publicly criticise umpires (referees) and their on ground decisions. There have many incidents when the wrong call has been made that affected the outcome of a game and players and coaches just have to suck it up. On hte flip side, past-players and coaches quickly jump all over the umpires… Has it worked for AFL? imo I don’t think it has, as fans are still unhappy about bad decisions, regardless if their players/coaches can’t comment, the commentators constantly ridicule the AFL governing body about it, and raise it often as a negative each time they get a “no comment” or “can’t comment” response from a player/coach. It just doesn’t make sense to me.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 174 total)