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  • #288129
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    MazdaChris
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    I really wish they would get rid of the big gap after Le Mans. It’s the premier event of the season, and the race people are most likely to bother watching. It seems incredibly short sighted not to want to capitalise on all the excitement generated by the 24h by having a succession of races shortly afterwards.

    I guess there is a need for a short break as the teams will need time to go back and repair/rebuild the cars after they battering they take, but I would have thought three weeks should be enough time, at the most. By the time the Nurburgring rolls around, people will have forgotten about it.

    #287555
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    MazdaChris
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    I wonder how many other WEC/F1 rumours will come true.

    #285908
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    MazdaChris
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    The thing I just can’t get past is how much money has been wasted by the team’s management. The team have underperformed, and remained glued to the back of the grid. They bemoan a lack of budget, but how much money has been thrown down the toilet? How much money did it cost chasing the rights to the Team Lotus branding, not to mention the cost of uniforms, signwriting, vehicle wrapping etc? And then how much money was spent on legal fees in a futile attempt to keep hold onto that name? How much did they spend on buying a new factory in Leafield? And then how much was spent buying the Caterham car company? And also funding feeder series teams running the same branding? Think about how many tens or even hundreds of millions were spent by the team’s owners, all because their egos demanded that they had a recognisable brand name on their cars. Imagine what the F1 team might have been capable of had all of that money been ploughed solely into the development of the cars. They could have had the budget and performance of a solid midfield team, but instead the money was flushed down the toilet.

    Companies and individuals have been left out of pocket for services they were never paid for. Hundreds of people are now facing unemployment right before Christmas. And while it’s really easy to bemoan the unfair distribution of prize money and commercial agreements in F1, the fact is that there should have been plenty of money to secure the future of this team for years to come, but was instead spent on pointless ventures. I feel sorry for the staff made redundant, and I feel terrible for the companies who have been swindled out of money by this bunch of cowboys. But the reason Caterham are in the mess they’re in is because they were run by people who thought it was more important to spend most of the money on the paintscheme of the car, rather than how fast it goes. People like that frankly do not have any business being in F1.

    #285674
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    MazdaChris
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    Unfortunately Caterham’s crowd funding has nothing to do with saving the team, and everything to do with securing the 10th place prize money for the administrators to pay off the creditors before the team is shut down. They’ve already laid off all the backroom staff (in addition o those they already made redundant earlier in the year) so the remaining ‘team’ is nothing more than the skeleton crew needed to make two cars appear on the grid at Abu Dhabi.

    Nobody has saved anything.

    #284120
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    MazdaChris
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    I think it would be interesting to compare the overall race durations to try and work out an average lapspeed this year compared to last. While I think the ultimate outright laptime may be slower, but I have a feeling that over the duration of a race, the cars in 2014 are faster. With more durable tyres and less fuel saving, it feels like drivers are able to consistently push for more of a race, with less dropoff in tyre performance compared to last year.

    Obviously there are other factors – track resurfacing, slight layout modifications, atmospheric conditions, etc etc. But I have a feeling that a 2014 car on 2014 tyres would now beat a 2013 car on 2013 tyres over a race duration.

    #283565
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    MazdaChris
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    Hasn’t Intrlagos been resurfaced and had a bit of reprofiling of the corners?

    #280306
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    MazdaChris
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    <p>#Audi Sport is committed to the @FIAWEC , @DTM and GT racing. In 2015 we will add the Audi Sport TT Cup to our program #welcomechallenges</p>— Audi Sport (@Audi__Sport) October 25, 2014

    <script async src=”//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js” charset=”utf-8″></script>

    #280305
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    MazdaChris
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    Audi have confirmed on their twitter feed that it’s all baseless rumours and they fully intend to proceed with their DTM and Le Mans programmes.

    #278692
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    MazdaChris
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    I imagine that during the days of unlimited track testing, tyres were regularly pushed well past this sort of distance. But it may well be a record for the longest distance covered in a single stint during a GP.

    #277351
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    MazdaChris
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    That is an absolutely horrific impact. Nearly lifts the truck into the air. At least having the weight of Sutil’s car off the front meant it did lift up. Without the weight of Sutil’s car hanging off the front it might not have lifted at all, and just totally flattned the Marussia.

    It’s hard to see how anyone can survive that. Hoping for the best, but fearing the worst. :(

    #272538
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    MazdaChris
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    I’m not sure I buy it as a reason for declining ratings. I think it has far more to do with a decreased visibility of the sport, and a lack of promotion through social media. Yes there were more outspoken drivers ten years ago, but they’re not outspoken when they’re driving, and the racing from ten years ago was abysmal compared to today. The cars lined up in order of speed, and trundled round for an hour and a half to two hours hardly ever changing position except for the fuel stops, while Schumacher won virtually every race.

    The cars were faster I guess, and the drivers made fewer mistakes because mistakes were more likely to end their race, but then that’s hardly a plus point – I think more mistakes make the racing more interesting and exciting for casuals, and the tons of overtaking we have now would have been beyond the wildest dreams of promoters ten years ago.

    F1 is a measurably better product in virtually every way today than it was ten years ago. The major difference is that F1 has been put behind a paywall in a large number of countries, and it isn’t spread or promoted in any way via social media. Casual fans aren’t going to pay subscription fees.

    The viewer numbers are massively dropping off in the UK despite there being a British driver in the middle of one of the best title fights in living memory, and despite the UK being basically the heartland of F1. The Belgian GP averaged less than three million viewers in the UK at the weekend, despite it being shown on BBC where anyone can view it. A few days later, the Great British Bake Off – essentially a cooking competition – averaged well over 8 million viewers. Nearly three times as many.

    #272492
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    MazdaChris
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    Most of those weren’t Red Bull driver programme graduates though were they. They were taken on or inherited from other teams. Point out one of those drivers who ever looked like they could be even remotely successful at the sharp end in F1. They were never going to make the grade, and so were dropped. But again, pretty much all went on to have ongoing careers elsewhere. Yeah, you can look at it like a production line, but it’s a production line which takes raw karters and then sponsors them throughout pretty much their whole career. Where other drivers are having to scrabble about trying to find sponsorships, those in the RBR programme don’t have to worry about any of that; they just have to focus on the business of convincing RBR that they are worthy of a seat in the top team. And even if they don’t manage that, they are still supported with sponsorship when they go elsewhere, when they will generally have their choice of other series’ to join because of the great reputation that Red Bull drivers have. That sounds like a hell of a good deal to me.

    #272488
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    MazdaChris
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    But you can’t argue with the end result. Yes the highest level is brutal and unforgiving, but it has yielded multiple world championships and race wins, with two of the best drivers on the grid right now. And even those who are cast adrift end up with brilliant careers off the back of it. They’ll have been given chances few other drivers are given, even if the ultimate standard is probably the highest in the world. Buemi now drives for Toyota in WEC, Alguersuari is going to be racing i Formula E next year. The participation in the Red Bull scheme has given them both a fantastic platform from which to pursue their own destinies. At the end of the day Red Bull are trying to find literally the best drivers in the world. As promising as Jev, Buemi, and Jaime may be, you’d have a hard time arguing that they met that criteria, but by the time you’re in Toro Rosso you’ve already reached an elite level and graduated with honours. Enough to take you into pretty much any racing category you might choose.

    #270852
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    MazdaChris
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    Helping raise awareness by not mentioning it once….

    #270839
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    MazdaChris
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    Maybe this is a stupid question, but how does pouring cold water on your head help any cause?

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 281 total)