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  • #203843
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    MazdaChris
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    One thing not mentioned above is that the DeltaWing(s) running in the ALMS next year won’t be the prototype which ran at Le Mans or at the Petit LM. The prototype uses one of the two chassis’ built by Prodrive for their abortive AMR-One programme, whereas these new production DeltaWings will have their own custom chassis designed from the ground up.

    The original DeltaWing prototype was developed as a potential IndyCar replacement, and as such it was built with a single-seat style tub. When they modified the concept for LM, they chose to buy a chassis which had already been homologated as it would mean they wouldn’t have to go through the crash test procedure which would have been impossible to get through in time for Le Mans 2012. Now with a bit of time available ahead of ALMS 2013, they’re able to fully develop the concept so you can expect an even better car to be rolled out for next year.

    The idea of seeing multiple DeltaWings racing side by side gives me goosebumps.

    #201338
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    MazdaChris
    Participant

    I think AMR would be mad to do it to be honest. Aston Martin make GT cars, and the best advert for GT cars is GT racing. Their various GTE cars look absolutely glorious, and they manage to beat the likes of Ferrari and Corvette. In terms of brand exposure, AM is already considered one of the most desirable and recognisable brands out there, so it’s hard to see what the appeal would be of pitching themselves into a sport where they’d have no hope of competing at the top level. It would mean throwing hundreds of millions of eurodollars at a venture which could only harm their brand values.

    #203842
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    MazdaChris
    Participant

    I don’t know why this little car has captured my heart in the way it has done. Maybe it’s because of the dramatic way in which its Le Mans attempt ended. There was something about the heroic attempts by one person for an hour and a half to get the car restarted by the side of the track which sort of summed up the whole spirit behind the car and the team itself.

    For whatever reason though, reading this literally put a lump in my throat. I can’t really say just how chuffed I am for them to be racing at Petit LM and potentially on into next year’s ALMS. A car this innovative and interesting deserves better than to be an interesting footnote in the history of motorsport.

    #210528
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    MazdaChris
    Participant

    The cause of the accident is irrelevant though; point is that it’s an accident where the driver’s exposed head has been severely injured, and that injury could have been avoided if the cockpit had some sort of protection over it.

    #210526
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    MazdaChris
    Participant

    You’re wrong. Dan Wheldon was killed by severe head trauma when the car hit the supporting post for the catch fence.

    http://espn.go.com/racing/indycar/story/_/id/7116556/coroner-says-dan-wheldon-died-head-injuries

    #144940
    Profile photo of MazdaChris
    MazdaChris
    Participant

    Thanks. I’m pretty useless with pastels, but they’re quite good fun to work with. Ink and pencil is definitely my preference. Maybe I’ll do a few more, though I’m rather lacking in inspiration.

    #210524
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    MazdaChris
    Participant

    Covering the cockpit doesn’t just prevent other cars from hitting your head. it would have prevented the deaths of Dan Wheldon and henry Surtees, and it would have prevented the horrific head injuries suffered by Felipe Massa and Maria De Villotta. Of course, in every one of these situations the cause was different, and it would be possible to identify changes which would prevent each one of them from happening again. But they all serve to highlight the vulnerability of the driver’s head.

    There was an accident in the Sau Paulo 6 hours on the opening lap which ended up with a Ferrari GT car sliding over the top of a closed-cockpit prototype. if the prototype had been open-cockpitted, then over a ton of Ferrari would have crushed the driver’s head onto his neck.

    I do think that the issue needs very careful thought and a proper solution needs to be implemented. There are a number of other safety issues raised by enclosing the cockpit, mostly to do with driver extraction, which need to be addressed. What we really don’t want to see is a driver injured by a situation which was directly caused by them being enclosed.

    #201333
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    MazdaChris
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    Realistically I can’t see a major manufacturer joining F1 in the current climate. This is due to a few different things, but is mainly down to two major factors. Money and the potential to be competitive. The money factor is, I think, fairly clear, but in essence it’s a hugely expensive sport to take part in and the returns in terms of brand exposure are minimal.

    The competitiveness problem I think deserves a little more explanation. As an example, look at Caterham. They’ve got major financial backing, a decent facility, two reasonable drivers, and plenty of engineering talent in the team. If you looked at Caterham you’d assume they’d be on the level of teams like Toro Rosso or Force India. But they aren’t. Mostly because of inexperience. An established team has a wealth of experience to draw upon when designing their cars. They have a degree of engineering maturity in how they approach the aero concepts on the cars. A new team starts without the benefit of this wealth of knowledge, and is at a huge disadvantage because of it. This shouldn’t be an insurmountable problem, except for the fact that testing is effectively banned. Time was, a new team could take their car to a test track and spend a week or two pumping in thousands of laps, testing all sorts of components. They could build up that database very effectively and then take their results to the track for races. It removes the ability of a new team to ever build sufficient data to gain ground on established teams.

    This means that the only viable route into F1 for a major car manufacturer is through purchasing an established outfit. This is what Force India did, and it’s what Red Bull have done. Both are now competitive teams who are firmly established in the sport. It’s the route that Lotus have (eventually!) taken and it seems to be giving them a fair bit of brand exposure as a result. Mercedes are also trying this out, although their history of involvement in the sport is rather more complicated. However this isn’t likely to be attractive for most car manufacturers, who want to see their own cars winning races rather than just putting their badges on someone else’s work. The history of the Mercedes team and their lack of competitiveness is also likely to put people off buying into an existing team; none of the good teams are for sale, and it seems that these days F1 isn’t a problem which can be solved simply by throwing money at it.

    Compare this to Toyota; spent years in F1 with something amounting to a blank chequebook, able to pour almost unlimited resource into their programme and even then they weren’t able to challenge for a title. They have now taken that expertise and channelled it into sportscar racing, and this weekend they managed to put in a commanding win over Audi who have for a very long time been the benchmark, in only their third race. If I was the head of motorsport for a large auto manufacturer I’d look at Mercedes and Caterham in F1, and then I’d look at Toyota in LMP1. To me, the smart money is spent in sportscar racing, where there’s still room for genuine innovation and you get a much much better return for your investment.

    For this reason, I find it extremely unlikely that we will see a major car manufacturer join with a brand new team. As for filling the 13th garage with privateers, well honestly I couldn’t be any less interested in the idea. We don’t need another HRT or Marussia, there are enough rolling chicanes in F1 without adding more dead weight to the sport.

    #144938
    Profile photo of MazdaChris
    MazdaChris
    Participant

    Never really done any F1 pictures, always been more interested in sports cars. But hey, why not eh. Did a quick pastel sketch this morning for fun.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/mazdachris2010/7988450909/

    And here’s a pencil and pen drawing I did a while back of an MX-5

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/mazdachris2010/7988462610/

    Not especially good, but I do enjoy a bit of art :)

    #210175
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    MazdaChris
    Participant

    I think it’s a shame that people feel hatred for any drivers. No matter what my feelings for the individuals, I am overwhelmed by a massive sense of admiration for anyone who is ever deemed good enough to grace the seat of an F1 car. When it comes to race winners and champions, I love them all, for their differences and their flaws as much as their strengths and abilities.

    I used to be proud as an F1 fan that the sport that I love could hold its head above the likes of football, where ‘fans’ are obliged to choose their favourites and pour hate on all others. It’s a sad fact that this seems increasingly to be a part of F1 fandom. There are drivers I like more than others, for a variety of reasons, but hatred has never registered for me. Not even for the likes of Maldonado, or Piquet Jr. I just can’t put myself into the mindset of a person who feels that way.

    #209215
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    MazdaChris
    Participant

    Yes, Brazil is a very rapidly developing nation and I think of all the ‘old school’ hosts, it’s probably the one which will be in the best place to meet the financial responsibilities of hosting and improving its facilities. Though its future may rely somewhat on Brazil continuing to provide top level drivers who can make it into F1

    When all is said and done, that will the cars be like in 2022 – what will the engines be like, how will the aero have changed, etc

    #209058
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    MazdaChris
    Participant

    That’s how I read it too; Hamilton was frustrated by his lack of pace in qualifying and, in the heat of the moment, decided to show people the telemetry as a way of saying “Hey, look, I wasn’t slow – Jenson was faster than me because of the speed down the straights because he had the low drag wing”. I wouldn’t go so far as to call it making excuses, as ti’s a totally valid point, but it does seem that he was concerned that people might think that Button had simply been faster purely because of driving talent, rather than the setup differences in the cars.

    #207856
    Profile photo of MazdaChris
    MazdaChris
    Participant

    All energy drinks are horrible. Unfortunately I don’t think you’ll see a car sponsored by PG Tips any time soon.

    #207852
    Profile photo of MazdaChris
    MazdaChris
    Participant

    @prisoner-monkeys

    I can’t see anything you’ve mentioned which you couldn’t equally level at any other front running team. The flexible front wing is a great example – the part was technically legal. The fact it used clever engineering to get around the tests was precisely the sort of gemesmanship which defines F1. Technically legal are the two most important words when it comes to building an F1 car. You have to look at the technical regs as a set of rules designed to limit the performance of the car. In order to build a fast car, you need to find a way of making the car faster than the rules were meant to make it, while still satisfying the letter of the law. This is certainly nothing new, and designers were doing this while Adrian Newey was still sucking his thumb.

    Red Bull are successful because over the past few years, they’re the ones who have been most effective at doing the above. Every other team were trying to do the same thing, and all were doing it to some extent. A much more blatant example would be Brawn’s introduction of the double diffusor which was a fine example of exploiting technical loopholes. It’s natural that in situations where a team is doing well, that the other teams will try to work out how they’re doing it. In some instances once they work out how it’s being done, they’ll seek a technical clarification. Sometimes it’s upheld and the FIA will clarify the rules which will close a small wording loophole. In other cases, they simply pass it as it’s outside of the scope of the rules. Double diffusors, off throttle exhaust blowing, f-ducts, all recent examples of things which have been technically challenged when the other teams have worked them out, but all were legal within the rules.

    What you won’t find, as far as I know, are any examples of Red Bull actually being found to have directly broken a rule. That is to say, something they’ve done which is illegal and banned under the rules. In that respect, they’ve not cheated. They’ve done the best job of maximising the performance of the car while satisfying the technical requirements of the formula. That’s not cheating, that’s just how you win at F1. They should be congratulated for it, not scorned!

    #207847
    Profile photo of MazdaChris
    MazdaChris
    Participant

    I’m not sure there are any examples of Red Bull cheating, in fairness. Brinksmanship is the essence of F1; you can’t call it cheating just because you don’t like the team.

Viewing 15 posts - 256 through 270 (of 301 total)