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  • #267699
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    Nick
    Participant

    I’m not sure I’m entirely comfortable winning while I ‘appointed’ the judge, but I’ll take it, unless the others protest.

    Here’s the (provisional?) challenge:

    I’ve ‘gone back to basics’ before with my challenges and I’m going to do so again! Your challenge is to find some French public roads and make a nice ‘old school’ track out of it.

    Rules:
    - Has to be set in mainland France.
    - Between 3.5 and 7.5 kilometers
    - You are not allowed to use previous F1 tracks on public roads (but you may use parts). These include Charade, Rouen, Reims or Montlhéry. The Le Mans 24 hour public roads are also not allowed.
    - You are allowed to built ‘over’ structures such as roundabouts and traffic islands.
    - You may build a ‘start finish’ section as some of the above tracks or the old Green Hell had, but this can only contain 4 corners from leaving public roads until rejoining them.
    - Pitlanes are nice (and can be newly built) but not mandatory.
    - Since tracks like these often either had a large number of actual corners or a large number of sweeps which could also be called curved straights, there is no corner limit.

    I’ll judge the entries on Friday after the end of FP2.

    #267698
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    Nick
    Participant

    Opening up the rules to those with money to develop faster/more efficiently might make the season even more predictable, though. In 2004, the first year of engines having to last one entire race weekend (shock horror at the time and would surely cause the drivers to go around saving the engine all race. The F2004 still broke tons of lap records.) yet development of many parts was still pretty open. Ferrari had the best car at the beginning of the season and did so at the end of the season. While the BMW and Honda engines were thought to be more powerful, they stood little chance at the might of Ferrari.

    If the rules were opened up, I think the order would change little, as Mercedes would be allowed to improve their dominant engine even more. The gap might shrink, but the current gap suggests that a repeat of 2004 is more likely than a late season surge like Red Bull in the past 2 seasons.

    #267672
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    Nick
    Participant

    @kevincucamest If you’d like, you can judge. This competition suffers from inactivity enough on its own, if you could create some new activity by declaring a winner, that’d be great.

    (I barely remember designing my track.. Not one of my best..)

    #267668
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    Nick
    Participant

    @abuello-paul Are we talking about the same Bernie that excluded Force India from any air time during Qualifying at the 2012 Bahrain GP weekend? http://www.theguardian.com/sport/2012/apr/22/f1-force-india-bahrain Because that is not a guy who would use his power for good.

    Not to mention, if Putin does not change course while assets are frozen and international politics are piling on to him, what would the commercial rights holder of a sport (that has sought to go to his country since the 80s) have for power over him?

    #267526
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    Nick
    Participant

    As far as the consequences of the airplane crash go, I stand with the Dutch prime minister in saying the first priorities are getting the deceased back to their relatives and to find out what happened and who is responsible, then think about the consequences. However, if Russia impedes, the EU and USA need to make a stand.

    Even with economic sanctions, the race could probably still be run since economic transparency is pretty foreign to the Russian government. And the teams gladly raced in Bahrain while Force India mechanics came under fire, the teams raced South Africa during apartheid (with drivers going because there were points on the table), so personally I don’t think the FOM, FIA or the teams have any kind of moral courage when it comes to these kind of conflicts..

    If the Russians keep impeding the investigation of MH17 or are found to be involved to a degree that EU countries boycott Russia completely (which cynically seems unlikely since there are economic consequences for EU countries as well…) these boycotts need to go as far as the French Boycotts of South Africa in 1985; making sure the teams can’t go. The teams would probably still go if Russian authorities arrested Gutierrez and forced Sauber to run Sirotkin and just so happened to disallow Raikkonen, Bottas, Hamilton, Maldonado, Perez, Massa and Kobayashi their visas.

    #266722
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    Nick
    Participant

    If the drivers market is a round of musical chairs, the CD at GP2 seems to skip an awful lot.. I do find it rather interesting Rossi has gone for a one race deal, but good on him. Hopefully he’ll find a seat with more guarantees soon, though. He’s no Vettel/Alonso/Hamilton, but would be nice to have an American near F1 for the time being.

    #266516
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    Nick
    Participant

    I’d say on the whole there have been little rivalries being consistently fought out on track in recent years. Still, the occasional WDC dual is more than we got in the days of Schumacher and Hakkinen.

    #266311
    Avatar of Nick
    Nick
    Participant

    @fastiesty The Dutch government hasn’t stepped in to save the Dutch cycling team known as Belkin now, Rabobank before, despite being a lot more popular than any Dutch F1 driver post-Verstappen. I really don’t think they’d sponsor Frijns even if he went on to win in other classes, which he should start considering soon, because he’s on the road to oblivion, rather than F1 right now.

    There have been more Dutch F1 candidates in recent years who had no problem getting through the lower classes, but never got into F1, like Melker, van der Zande and Crevels in the past. All talented drivers, which leads me to think de Vries and Verstappen might not get through as easy as people are thinking right now either.

    Dutch sponsors are historically more likely to sponsor a team than a driver as well, as is evident with Randstad sponsoring Williams and Philips sponsoring them in the past. Apart from Shell, Unilever, Philips and Randstad, we don’t have that many multinationals which have anything to do in F1, either.

    Even if the government gets involved, that doesn’t have to mean success in the long run. Prost Grand Prix basically went under because Chirac ended the mandate that French businesses had to support French sporting teams, Gauloises left, as did Total, as did Bic and one could argue about Agfa (even though they’re Belgian, they left the sport entirely after leaving Prost).

    #266306
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    Nick
    Participant

    Set in the scorching heat of Phoenix, Arizona, running at maximum RPM for a lot of the lap, a number of apexes drives can get very wrong after those long follow throughs.. It’d be interesting to see what happens to engine reliability and driver stamina here.

    http://www.gmap-pedometer.com/?r=6365824

    #266303
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    Nick
    Participant

    @mathers If a country has something to gain by one of its citizens being in F1, they usually do. Venezuela and Mexico have sort of directly sponsored their drivers, as has Malaysia (both on the Stewart cars and when Alex Yoong was proving why we needed a 107% rule).

    I think a lot of countries have far wiser means to spend their millions on, though. If the Dutch government would pull out a few million to get Giedo van der Garde in a Sauber, I’m pretty sure they’d be rioting harder than they’re right now after losing the semi finals.

    #266208
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    Nick
    Participant

    @rjoconnel I don’t think that’s entirely fair. After all, Schumacher only has 68 poles to 91 wins, so sometimes the same driver as the race before won, despite someone else being on pole.

    Mind you, love Schumacher, do not miss the refueling era. Especially when all the teams figured out the exact same strategy, which happened more often than not.

    #266037
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    Nick
    Participant

    @plushpile I must mind my phrasing, I meant I’d rather see a FR3.5 DRS system, where every driver has a limited amount of usage.

    #265947
    Avatar of Nick
    Nick
    Participant

    @david-a I bookmarked it, I’ll have a look next race. Thanks!

    #265942
    Avatar of Nick
    Nick
    Participant

    Juan had been looking good all year, but I hadn’t imagined he’d win one just yet. I really do need to find me a way to watch Indycar..

    #265941
    Avatar of Nick
    Nick
    Participant

    Have to enjoy the way the commentators talk about a major pile up like this, as if it’s inevitable at Daytona. Junior had a pretty lucky escape there, though, going from 30 to 10. With luck like that for a change, he might actually hang in there for a title attack. Interesting to see the championship table after this weekend.

    When I saw this footage on Twitter I had to look twice though, still not used to number 3 being back in Sprint Cup..

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