Forum Replies Created

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 802 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #289179
    Profile photo of Nick
    Nick
    Participant

    Squirrel Creek Raceway, Colorado Springs, Colorado.

    http://www.gmap-pedometer.com/?r=6498200

    Track itself if 5.1 kilometers long, the other stuff is there because I nearly forgot to draw a pitlane. It’s been a while since I entered in one of these! Track is somewhat inspired by Magny Course and Istanbul Park.

    #288125
    Profile photo of Nick
    Nick
    Participant

    Throughout the year I’ve been grading the drivers. Looking at the final grades, I have to say no-one had a standout season in my rankings and there were some surprises compared to where I would put the drivers on top of my head. (I’ve been giving a lot of 6s and 7s out of 10 all season.)

    I decided not to include Will Stevens and Andre Lotterer, since both did just one race with minimal preparation, but both did pretty decent.

    22. Esteban Gutierrez

    Largely unimpressive, cost Sauber valuable points at Monaco and had a number of strange run-ins during the season. Impressed me sometimes later in the season (Hungary stands out), but doesn’t seem like a driver who can put together a full season on full power.

    21. Marcus Ericsson

    Started off pretty poorly with his Q1 Monaco incident with Massa as a low point. As the season progressed, he seemed to improve and kept out of trouble. Not a debut season I’ll remember.

    20. Adrian Sutil

    On paper should have had the upper hand on his team mate, but didn’t always do so and frankly also threw away points at Monaco. As experienced as he is, he is hopeless.

    19. Kamui Kobayashi

    Didn’t quite impress and as the season progressed, Ericsson seemed to get closer. It’s hard to stand out in a team like Caterham, but he simply didn’t.

    18. Max Chilton

    Seemed to be closer to Bianchi this season, but generally mediocre. Still, leaving a mediocre impression is better than what the drivers with lower rankings left, so he’s got that.

    17. Pastor Maldonado

    While he seemingly has calmed down a lot and managed to get closer and closer to Grosjean during the season, he still had his iffy moments during the beginning of his season. All in all a average season from a driver I think could do a lot better.

    16. Kimi Raikkonen

    To be honest, I expected him to be higher on my list. I felt I have him pretty reasonable grades for most of his races, but he averaged a 6 out of 10 on my list. I accounted his car troubles, but frankly, he has driven cars not to his liking before, but never had this kind of issue with them. Can’t call it anything other than a disappointment.

    15. Daniil Kvyat

    Started off strongly and frankly is one of the STR drivers I personally feel is the safest pair of hands while maintaining speed throughout the weekend. Still, as the season went on, Toro Rosso didn’t seem to be able to finish ahead of where they would logically finish, making it hard to judge his drives.

    14. Jean-Eric Vergne

    Vergne had a less impressive start, but I personally feel he got more out of the car during the races which gave him the edge in my personal ratings. Personally would have promoted him to RBR and kept Kvyatt in STR.

    13. Kevin Magnussen

    Had some weekends where he seemed to be on top of things, but a lot of times I felt he was simply following Button for most of the race, only to end up several places behind him. A good debut season, but a team with a luxury problem like McLaren might think good isn’t what they’re looking for.

    12. Jules Bianchi

    I think the feeling I had when he crossed the line in Monaco can only be compared to what I felt when Jos Verstappen finished 4th at Monza in 2000; an underdog I support finally got a dream result. While Monaco saw both Sauber drivers goofing off and Raikkonen having an off day, he still got the car home in 9th, despite some penalties. The rest of the season saw him ending up where I personally expected him to be; best of the backmarkers and sometimes sneaking into Q2.

    He’s in my thoughts a lot and if there’s anything I’d want for Christmas, it’s good health for him and Michael Schumacher..

    11. Sergio Perez

    Finishing third at Bahrain was quite an awesome performance, but he didn’t quite have the same handle on Hulkenberg for most of the rest of the season, despite him looking good to finish in front of Nico during some of the races. I’d say this season with this car is a logical step after his 2012 season with Sauber and has washed away any doubts his season at McLaren have made about his capabilities. For me, anyway.

    10. Felipe Massa

    He had an amazing end to the season and his pole at Austria was an awesome lap. However, it cannot be ignored that Bottas did a lot better with the same car in more races. I’m not quite sure we have ‘the old Massa back’, but he showed a lot more of his past form than he did at Ferrari, even the good run he had in late 2012-early 2013. His start of the season was quite poor, compared to the end.

    9. Nico Hulkenberg

    I can be short and frank about his season; got the most out of the car more often than not and beat his teammate. Why this guy isn’t at a top team is beyond me. It could have something to do with the weekends he doesn’t seem to be on it, though.

    8. Romain Grosjean

    Quite surprised to see him end up so high in my rankings, but he did drag that thing called Lotus E22 to points and he had a fair share of battles that were nice to watch. Just a shame he couldn’t pick up where he left off in late 2013 as far as results go.

    7. Jenson Button

    Had quite a few results above my expectations, did well during races and frankly just did a good job.

    6. Sebastian Vettel

    Didn’t seem to enjoy this season, was beaten soundly by his teammate both in qualifying and races more often than I ever imagined and had some strange races where he just couldn’t get the most out of the car. But he’s still an amazing driver and scored some proper results.

    5. Fernando Alonso

    Once more (sadly) had to drag his Ferrari to results that it shouldn’t get and nearly won a race in a car that couldn’t qualify on the front row to save its life. Still, as in 2013, the highs seemed to be a little less high than in the past, or at least, fewer than in seasons like 2005, 2006, 2010 and 2012. As a Ferrari fan, I’m sad to see him go, as an Alonso fan, I hope he gets a car that can perform as well as him.

    4. Valtteri Bottas

    Never rated him highly, proved me wrong all season long. Great in races, great in combat and if I didn’t know any better I’d say he has been in F1 for years.

    3. Nico Rosberg

    Rosberg is a driver that doesn’t invoke a lot of passion or seems to have peaks like many other drivers, just a solid level and a level under solid. He had a few odd races and sessions out where I couldn’t quite put my finger on why he’d made a mistake or was slower than Hamilton. All in all a very good season (as a Schumacher fan, I’m glad his results started people talking about Schumacher’s performance at Mercedes in a more positive light as well) but he lost the title bit by bit over the season.

    2. Daniel Ricciardo

    What a guy. Such amazing performances against a 4 time WDC team mate, some heroic battles and some great qualifying performances. I wish I had something sensible to say, but I’ve never been as wrong about a driver as I’ve been about Ricciardo; I rated him considerably lower than Vergne and didn’t expect much of him at all.

    1. Lewis Hamilton

    Had a dominant car, but faced many set backs and won races by overtaking his team mate on track and frankly I found him more impressive during races.

    Personally, if I hadn’t graded the drivers for each race (they competed) I think Button and Grosjean might have been a little lower, but overall I quite like this method.

    #285619
    Profile photo of Nick
    Nick
    Participant

    I think Bernie today gave a perfect assist. Now it’s a matter of something kicking it in the goal and I’ll be out for at least a while.

    What an out of touch and tired little world F1 is turning into. For a sport with such great fans and people who work in it, those who are at the top of the food chain manage to ruin it for everyone.

    If I want to be insulted, I’ll go out of my way to do so. I don’t have to watch a sport to be insulted.

    #285320
    Profile photo of Nick
    Nick
    Participant

    The thing is, it’s not exactly the team doing this. It’s a bunch of random administrators who also work for the crowdfunding website. Imagine if HSBC took control of Marussia and asked for crowdfunding; people would be outraged. Frankly, I’m surprised not more people are at the Caterham situation.

    If it were a bunch of employees who started it, I would have donated. But the link between the administrators and crowdfunding website, as well as the completely anonymous feeling I get from the campaign leave a foul taste in my mouth.

    #284340
    Profile photo of Nick
    Nick
    Participant

    Plot twist:

    Button, Alonso and Vettel all go to WEC for 2015, driving a customer Audi.

    Plot twist #2:

    Sauber has signed Sutil, van der Garde, Ericsson and Nasr because they are awaiting Forza Rossa, to sell them Adrian and Giedo in exchange for their 2014 car.

    (Brought to you by ‘so mad it could feature on TheJudge13′)

    #282064
    Profile photo of Nick
    Nick
    Participant

    While 2009 is definitely an interesting season, I see some problems with the ‘set up’ of the script, especially for a larger audience.

    Rush kept it rather clean; it established Lauda and Hunt, F1 racing and specifically the position of Hesketh vs. top teams and let the story of 1976 be told by rather cinematic moments.

    For a 2009 season, the establishing of Honda as a manufacturer with poor results would take some time, as well as the positioning of Ferrari and McLaren. The saga between late 2008 and Melbourne 2009 also doesn’t strike me as a very interesting one for cinema.

    The season itself could be told in the same manner as Rush: highlighting notable characters and racers, but Red Bull would also need its backstory told and to truly capture the feeling of Button’s mid season struggles, you’d need to point out the criticism he has had since day one as well.

    The accident in Hungary would, in a film about the season, be a rather strange side-step, even if it does introduce new characters, it is not an injury that (again, for the sake of cinema, I’m not trying to throw Felipe under the bus here) has a very large effect on the plot. With the title being decided without victory and with a race to go, maybe the facts would need some tinkering as well.

    I think basing a film on a season would simply be too hard to get right from a cinematic standpoint. Rush was more about Hunt vs. Lauda than it was about the 1976 season. If a movie based on a rivalry in F1 were too be made, I’d personally prefer Senna vs. Prost, Schumacher vs. Hakkinen (there’s a character that Hollywood could turn into a comeback kid of sorts) or even Hamilton vs. Alonso (though one could argue that Hollywood already tried that with Driven).

    #281836
    Profile photo of Nick
    Nick
    Participant

    What Bernie says, goes, and he said there could be 14 cars on the grid next year.

    Toto Wolff Racing Mercedes Toto Wolf AMG Toto Wolff F1
    Lewis Hamilton
    Nico Rosberg

    Red BS Renault
    Ricciardo
    Kvyatt

    Please sir, can I have some more Williams
    Bottas
    Nasr

    Ferrari’s spending extravaganza
    Vettel
    Raikkonen

    If you can’t spend 100 million on a fine, you’re not McLaren Honda
    Alonso
    Button

    Toro Rosso
    Vergne
    Verstappen

    I can’t believe it’s not Lotus
    Grosjean
    Maldonado

    To be honest, who needs Lotus? Maybe having 12 cars would be even more exclusive?

    #281835
    Profile photo of Nick
    Nick
    Participant

    F1 kind of phased out of my life when I was 16 and it didn’t really recapture me until I was 20. At that time, we were losing Jordan, Minardi, Mosley was constantly in the news in a negative light, the entire Spy-gate thing happenend and frankly it didn’t impact me as much because it didn’t really have a place in my life at the time.

    But ever since late 2010 I’ve been more of a fan than before (not just rooting for 1 driver did that for me) and frankly the annoyances are turning into nails in the coffin of F1 as a hobby.

    Frankly, I can’t name a place or event that would shut the lid on F1 for me, but I never imagined myself boycotting a race (as I did with Russia) nor that I’d ever find someone to be more delusional about the future of the sport than Ferrari around 2004 until 2006. Now it’s half of what’s left of the damn teams!

    The most worrying thing is, is how the entire sport is in a phase that can’t logically exist in the lifespan of businesses. It’s still ran by an entrepeneur (Bernie) but intensely profitable (at which point in time, typically the reigns are handed over to people who are better at managing and the entrepeneur is more of a figurehead). If Bernie were to be taken away from his position, we have no idea what the FOM and CVC might do to keep current deals in place, improve things for fans/competitors and most frightening of all; who is going in his place.

    Frankly, being an F1 fans feels like working for a company that is about to go under; you know the end is coming, but when?

    #281416
    Profile photo of Nick
    Nick
    Participant

    Williams’ site is not available in Finnish or Portuguese. I think this means Button and Hamilton are joining them for 2015.

    The Scuderia Ferrari website is available in Spanish, but not in Finnish or German. This means either a Spanish, English, Italian or Chinese driver will replace Raikkonen at Ferrari.

    #280469
    Profile photo of Nick
    Nick
    Participant

    Considerding Boullier’s words of teams needing a 6 months notice and seeing how Arrows and Super Aguri went out, I’d say the following is possible.

    Mercedes
    Hamilton
    Rosberg

    Red Bull
    Ricciardo
    Kvyatt

    Williams
    Bottas
    Massa

    Ferrari
    Vettel
    Raikkonen

    McLaren Honda
    Button
    Magnussen

    Force India
    Hulkenberg
    Perez

    Toro Rosso
    Vergne
    Verstappen

    Lotus
    Grosjean
    Maldonado

    Sauber
    Nasr
    Sirotkin

    #280380
    Profile photo of Nick
    Nick
    Participant

    Several Dutch racing series have collapsed due to a combination of lack of interest (though not always lack of entrants, Dutch Touring Car Championship), manufacturers backing out (though not always immediately ending the series, Renault Clio Cup) and a lack of entrants (Dutch Formula Ford). That, and they basically only have 3 tracks to visit; Zandvoort, Assen and Spa, where Zandvoort is the most common and somehow has the least crowds.

    Typically, series here fall on hard times once a main sponsor walks away (like the manufacturer of a single make championship or the title sponsor) since they cover a lot of the costs. International series are less likely to receive such backing, but if they have manufacturer support, it’s the only thing they have (like World Series by Renault, I doubt any of those classes would survive without Renault running them).

    Perhaps moreso than ‘just’ having insufficient funds, I think the complexity of funding a racing series in any capacity is very difficult (car development, finding places to race, insurance, etc) and if one of those elements suddenly falls through or has a major price spike (my memory is clouded, but I think there was a Dutch racing category canceled over Zandvoort suddenly dropping them out of a ‘pack’ which allowed them to control costs for hosting races there) the entire series can fall through.

    Personally, I think there’s also the matter or bad planning. Much like millionaires or car companies entering F1 and dropping out after a few years, companies and investors do the same for smaller racing series. Renault announced they weren’t going to continue the Dutch Clip Cup very late into the 2006 season, which saw Dunlop (yes, the tyre company) taking over the running of the series for 3 seasons…

    #280381
    Profile photo of Nick
    Nick
    Participant

    I do think Audi and WEC might not go on much longer (Porsche stands to benefit a lot more from WEC and Le Mans than Audi does at this point), I don’t think entering F1 as a works team is going to happen. I do think the Volkswagen-Audi Group could benefit from F1 involvement as an engine supplier, I don’t think any manufacturer or high-end cars is looking at Mercedes in awe right now.

    Let’s not forget the rumors of 2012 and early 2013 that basically had us wondering if Mercedes would spend a lot more time in F1 as a works team. Daimler made it rather clear that their 2010-2012 performances were not adequate. The VAG right now doesn’t have the opportunity to buy into an entry as strong as BrawnGP/Honda was for Mercedes in 2009. None of the VAG brands have recent F1 experience in any capacity, none of the ailing F1 teams seem like a safe bet (or would gladly step into a situation like McLaren’s with Mercedes right now with their engine partners) for them to join up with a VAG brand..

    I think any VAG brand would have to take the long road, like Mercedes did. But frankly, I think only Volkswagen, Skoda or Seat would have anything to gain from entering F1 and they’re all in other series already.

    #278009
    Profile photo of Nick
    Nick
    Participant

    Personally I think it’s great those articles were not ran after last weekend.

    For example, if Ferrari’s points streak would have ended in any other race, a lot more people would have commented on it and a much bigger deal would have been made of it. Yet, with Bianchi’s accident, it’s rendered a moot point. Much like, in my mind, who was the best driver of the race or how good the race was.

    Both comment sections typically have heated discussions about why people rate a race/driver the way they do and I can only see trouble if people would vote Bianchi for driver of the weekend or would vote the race a 1 because of the accident, or a 8 because of the actual running, ignoring the accident. It would no doubt result in a discussion that would be unpretty.

    #277286
    Profile photo of Nick
    Nick
    Participant

    Really sad to hear this. Andrea was one of the first drivers before my time I researched because I had a model car he drove. RIP Andrea..

    #277285
    Profile photo of Nick
    Nick
    Participant

    The first race I watched was Jerez 1997, but I don’t remember it at all. I do remember getting up early for the 1998 Australian GP and being disappointed when Schumacher retired due to an engine failure, which I’ve always considered an indication the Jerez incident made me a Schumacher fan, somehow.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 802 total)